Paleo Apple Crisp Grain – Free Dessert

Share:

Paleo

By Dr. Justin Marchegiani

This Paleo apple crisp recipe is amazingly simple, tastes great, and even leaves you feeling good after you eat it!  I am always a big fan of using whole-food ingredients (things you can pronounce) that provide good nutrition and zero gut-irritating foods and don’t cause your holiday binge to set you back on your health goals.

Ingredients:

  • 8 Granny Smith apples
  • lemon juice
  • 1 cup of pecans
  • 1 cup of walnuts
  • 4 Tbsp. of Kerry gold butter
  • 1 heaping Tbsp. of raw organic honey
  • 1 handful of coconut flakes

Directions:

1.  Slice 8 Granny Smith apples. I leave the skins on because it’s just easier that way. Use an apple slicer to make things more efficient. Once the apples are sliced, add just a little bit of lemon juice to prevent the apples from oxidizing (turning brown).

2. Add enough cinnamon so all of the apples are covered. Mix with your hands until everything is evenly covered.

3.  Put 1 cup of pecans and 1 cup of walnuts in a bag and crush them with a rolling pin.

4.  Add 4 Tbsp. of Kerry gold butter (in gold packaging) and 1 heaping Tbsp. of raw organic honey to a saucepan on the stove set at low temperature till everything is melted together and mixed evenly.

5.  Spread the crushed nuts on top of the apples, and 1 handful of coconut flakes can be spread on top of the apples as well for additional flavor.  The amount of nuts you need is really dependent on the size of the pan the apples are in. I recommend just covering everything as evenly as possible.  If you have extra nuts left over, they can be added to the apples to make the crust thicker if you’d like.

6.  Pour the honey-and-butter mixture over the apples evenly.

7.  Cook for 45 minutes at 350 degrees.  Serve with whipped organic whole cream or sugar-free coconut ice cream and enjoy!  Don’t tell your family till after they rave about how good it was that it was actually healthy for them!

Substitutions:  Coconut oil can always be subbed for butter.  Stevia and xylitol can be used as sugar substitutes for honey if you are trying to keep all sugar out of your diet.

Enjoying What You've Read? Sign Up For FREE Updates Delivered To Your Inbox.

Share:
The entire contents of this website are based upon the opinions of Dr. Justin Marchegiani unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective author, who retains copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Justin and his community. Dr. Justin encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Marchegiani’s products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using any products.