Enhancing Your Immune System With Vitamin D This Winter | Podcast #321

Getting enough vitamin D is essential to your long-term health. It’s relatively easy to get vitamin D through sun exposure most of the year, but that changes come wintertime. So here is Dr. J and Evan discussing why vitamin D matters and how to keep your levels up, even when the days are short and the skies are snowy and gray. 

Vitamin D absorbs calcium and helps you maintain healthy bones. It also contributes to the health of your muscles, nerves, and immune system. So if you don’t get enough vitamin D, you may be at risk of developing rickets, osteoporosis, other bone disorders, diabetes, hypertension, and cancer. Older adults, people with dark skin, and obesity are more likely to have a vitamin D deficiency.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani

Dr. Justin Marchegiani

In this episode, we cover:

1:49    The Importance of Vitamin D in Winter

5:15    Viruses in Winter Season

11:20  Vitamin D Supplements and Benefits

14:03  Vegan Vitamin D

19:01  Vitamin D as Epigenetic Regulator

22:55  Respiration Issues and Blood Pressure Issues

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Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And we are live is Dr. J here in the house with Evan Brand. Today we’re going to be talking about vitamin D to help enhance your immune system is such a good topic because in the winter months, we’re exposed to all kinds of viruses and bacteria out there and immune stressors. There’s less sunlight, more cold, more sugar, more sweets, more holiday stress. And we really want to make sure that you guys have a strong immune system to be resistant to what’s happening in today’s environment. Evan, how are we doing today, my man?

Evan Brand: Doing really well. I’m ready for the sunshine to come back. You know, I was looking at my D minder app the other day, and the vitamin D window just opened back up. So and the which, technically, according to the way the earth is tilting, we’re actually past the deepest, darkest parts of winter. But you know, late December, because of Northern latitude, and the angle of the sun and all that you literally cannot make vitamin D, even if you’re outside, but naked, you just can’t. But luckily, according to my app, the vitamin D Window, at least from my latitude, just opened up about six days ago. So if there is Sunshine out from about 12 to one or two, there’s a good like two hours a day right now based on my latitude, where I can get adequate vitamin D with enough skin exposure. But the problem is, most people in the middle of the day there may be on their lunch break at their office, you probably can’t get outside enough to get the sun. And if it’s cloudy, of course that cancels it out? And can you undress enough at your office building to get enough sunshine to get enough vitamin D? So, in general, the answer is no. And this is why I would say 90% of people that we’ve tested via blood, we’re going to see vitamin D deficiency. And this is just something you cannot afford to be deficient in

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 110%. So in today’s environment, with the winter being where it’s at, and depending on your latitude and longitude and, and your ability to be outside and expose yourself, getting vitamin D naturally to the sun, and it’s forming kind of these pre cholesterol d3, and that d3 being absorbed into your kidneys and liver, right, it’s odds are going to be pretty low. So we’re gonna have to supplement this time of year, that’s going to be without a doubt. And we got to get our vitamin D levels up to an optimal range as well, because we need to be at least above 50 on the United States metric for vitamin D, that’s important. If you have an autoimmune issue, if you have any cancer predispositions, you probably want to be even as high as 70, to 100, but at least 50 on the vitamin D side to really maintain optimal immune function.

Evan Brand: And this is something you can actually test at home now, which is pretty cool. So there are some labs that you and I can work with, where we can get people some dried blood spot testing. But if you’re working with us clinically, we might as well just run a full blood panel looking into thyroid and everything else. Because if you have other symptoms, you could take vitamin D and not fix yourself, meaning it’s great to optimize that. But you could still have other issues. So you could just do the at home blood panel or if we’re going to get you to the lab, we might as well look at everything else. And you’re not looking at an expensive test. It’s kind of hard to believe that this is not standard practice. But you go to your conventional doctor down the road, and they run basic blood work on you, they’re not going to run vitamin D, unless you ask for it. And even then they may say, Oh, it’s not covered by insurance. So what is your reply? Because it’s generally only going to be maybe 20, maybe $50. US max to test this is not an expensive test.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No, no, it’s definitely not an expensive test. Now in general, and give you guys a couple of markers here in regards to the ranges. So off the bat, I already mentioned 50 to 70 is a pretty good range to be in I think for most people, right? If we have cancer, heart issues, autoimmune stuff, we can go 70 to 100. And the metric we want to look for is going to be nanograms per milliliter nanograms per milliliter. In Europe they do or Canada they do nano moles per liter. And the conversion on that I want to say is about two, you multiply whatever the level is here and you multiply it by about 2.25. And that gives you that conversion, right? So for at about 50 or so on the vitamin D here is sufficient, right? That’s the nanogram per milliliter multiply it by 2.25. That’s about 125 nano moles per liter if we’re talking Europe or Canada so you guys can make the conversion 2.25 All right, so 50 to 70 is ideal 70 to 100 is going to be you know if we have cancer, heart disease, immune issues. Now when we supplement with vitamin D, we want to make sure we’re taking d3 if your diets really great, lots of green vegetables, high quality gi butterfat, good kaitou then you’re probably fine. You don’t need k two if your diets not awesome or not great or you want that extra bit of insurance, you can always do vitamin K to with your vitamin D, just to make sure there’s an adequate balance there. A lot of your fat soluble vitamins tend to come and work together vitamin D vitamin K work importantly well because k helps calcium get into the bone D helps calcium be absorbed. From the gut as well, so it’s nice to have some k there. So we’re really helping to put all that calcium back into the bone that we’re now absorbing better in our gut from vitamin D. So it’s nice to have that as an insurance policy to make sure we’re putting and telling that calcium where it needs to go.

Evan Brand: Yeah, well said, I just put another paper in the chat for you if you want it. This was from 2006. And it was just talking about how there was back in the 1980s, a guy Edgar hope Simpson proposed that a seasonal stimulus was intimately associated with seasonal epidemic, influenza. And long story short, the fancy way of saying, hey, winter comes and then boom, all of a sudden, you know, viruses become more of a prevalent issue. And then long story short, there was this whole interventional study, which there’s many, many, many, many on this long story short, vitamin D is reducing the incidence of respiratory infections in children. So this is specifically talking about kids. But there are countless of these for adults. And so what’s happening when the vitamin D levels are sufficient, are a multitude of things. But in particular, it’s helping to reduce interleukin six, which is one of those inflammatory cytokines that we’re seeing get people in trouble. So if you can reduce your cytokines, that’s going to be beneficial. And then also another cool benefit is not only as sort of an anti viral, but there’s some anti microbial benefit, which I honestly didn’t know much about this and start till I started reading these papers here that it can actually activate your immune cells to produce some anti microbials. So sort of like a natural antibiotic, if you will, by upping vitamin D concentration. Now, the question is, well, how do people take it? Is it just an ongoing thing, if you think you’re getting into trouble with the illness, do you go high dose of it, I think it depends on what your levels are. So would you say you probably want to get a baseline first to know where you’re at and how you should address it or-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Baseline first, I mean, I would say the wider your skin is, the more fair your skin is. Probably the more efficient you are going to be at converting vitamin D from the sun, right? The darker your skin is think of your your the darkness in your skin, that’s melanin, right, the more melanin you have, so you have kind of different spectrums full on African American, that’s the highest amount of melanin, melanin is like your natural UV block, right, it helps block your skin from the sun’s rays. So due to evolution, and where we evolved, people that evolved closer to the equator, more UV light based on the angle of the Sun hitting it, they naturally evolved with more melanin in the skin, people that have all further away from the equator, less direct UV light, less melanin in the skin, because it’s all about making vitamin D. So the more efficient you are at making vitamin D, you probably are going to be, you’ll probably be able to get away with not supplementing as much or as frequent. The more melanin in your skin, the more you have to be on top of your vitamin D, because unless you’re going to be outside six to eight hours a day, and you’re at a, you know, mid to low 30 latitude, you’re probably just not going to be able to ever make enough vitamin D, therefore, you really have to be on top of everything. And you’re testing. So lighter skin, I think in general, a good rule of thumb is 1000, I use per 25 pounds of body weight, especially in the fall and winter months. And then if you want to take a break in the summer, that’s fine, just make sure you get a test here there to confirm it, the darker your skin is, you may even want to double that in the winter months. And then you may want to follow up and retest come the early spring and see where you’re at kind of monitor where you’re at. If you’re someone that works outside, that’s you have to make that adjustment. If you’re an office person you’re inside all day, you also have to make that adjustment to so in general 1000, I use per 25 pounds of body weight. And then if you have darker skin, you may want to double that for the winter months. And then it’s always good to confirm in the summertime in the winter, and sometime coming off the winter, early spring summer to see where you’re at. And then we can always adjust accordingly. And if there’s any risk of autoimmunity or cancer, we probably want to be testing just a little bit more frequently. Once you kind of know where you’re at, you can kind of guess based on how well you’re doing. And then in regards to vitamin D, you know, I mean, vitamin K, K2, you probably want anywhere between 100 150 micrograms of K2 is kind of where you want where you’re going to be at per day on average. And so if you’re doing lots of green vegetables, if you’re doing sauerkraut fermented foods, you’re doing kaitou from grass fed butter or ghee, you’ll probably be fine. And then if you want that insurance policy of about 150 micrograms, you can always just find a good vitamin d3 with that in there. And then that gives you that extra assurance that you’re okay there. 

Evan Brand: Yep. And the other cool thing about this I mean, in terms of how big of a game changer This is for your health for your immunity, we’re talking minor dollars for testing. We’re talking minor dollars for actually buying something now, we’re still going to advise you to go with the more professional product just because that’s what we’re going to use clinically. That’s what we’re going to sell to people so we still do Want you to get a good quality product, but in a pinch, could you get away with something just a typical store brought brand, probably. So we just have a lot of sensitive people. So we’re going to want to avoid a lot of the fillers, you’ll see soybean oil, sometimes you’ll see other things that we don’t like, and some of the cheap brands. So we’re going to try to get you just like a straight d3, possibly with a little bit of gelatin. But even sometimes we’re gonna do like a veggie cap, when you’ve got maybe a little bit of cellulose but- 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: MCT oil or olive oil, some kind of a healthier fat versus like you mentioned a soy or something more junky or more like polyunsaturated. 

Evan Brand: Yeah, but once again, I mean, you’re looking at, in general, I know some of the professional brains, you and I use, cost wise, you’re looking at, like 50 to 60 bucks for six months. So I mean, you’re talking maybe 10 bucks a month, and that’s for like professional quality. And there are liquid versions that you can use for children as well. I’ve got both of my kids taking vitamin D. Now we do give them some different cod liver oils and omega. So you can get some vitamin D naturally from some of the cod liver oils, you can get a few 1000 iu, but we are still doing a little bit of extra K1, K2 and D3 for the kids. And that’s easy. And my daughter calls it Hummingbird food, because it’s clear just like our Hummingbird food and it tastes a little sweet. So she loves it. It’s like her favorite part of the day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, cuz it’s got a tiny bit of stevia in there. Right. And then you also have, you know, it’s clear liquid vitamin like the MCT oil in there. That’s Yeah, good. Yeah. Excellent. Yeah. So 100% on that, I would say supplementally. Like you mentioned cod liver oil, very good. You can also look at other fat soluble vitamins, the other ones may be vitamin A, right. So if you’re doing high quality, ghee or grass fed butter, you’re probably getting a good amount of vitamin A in there, especially if you’re doing something your tea or coffee in the morning. If you’re eating good grass fed grass fed beef and you’re doing good quality pasture egg fed egg yolks, then you’re going to be set on a lot of that, if you want some additional insurance, you can do some cod liver oil, like I mentioned, you can get a vitamin D that has some vitamin A in it, or just use some of the extra cod liver oil and get some good egg yolks in and you’ll probably be totally fine with that. Anything else you want to add?

Evan Brand: Yep. I would just encourage people not to do. Yeah, I would say I just encourage people not to do the conventional D2 supplement that you’re going to get from a local doctor. For example, if you ask your neighbor down the road to give you some vitamin D, they’re probably going to give you D2. They may give you like a 50,000 iu or possibly even like 100,000 iu that you’re going to get from a pharmacy, it’s going to be loaded with a bunch of binders and fillers. And we find that just those really high doses for a few days don’t really do as much as a lower dose over a longer period of time. So it’s not where you just come in and do 100,000 for a week and you’re cured. Now you really need to just optimize it over a slower period of time.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, like myself, I’m not gonna lie, I’ll do sometimes 40 or 50, once a week, to kind of keep my levels pretty good. But I think it just kind of depends on where you’re at. Right. So if if for some reason, you know, you forget to do your vitamin D, I’d rather have people do it like at least once a week. So it’s there because it is a fat soluble vitamin. So it will kind of build up in your system. It’s not like a B vitamin where you just pee it out. But ideally, every day is good, especially in the morning time because think about it, you wouldn’t naturally make vitamin D in the middle of the night or at nighttime, if you’re taking it right, you’d make it more in the morning to afternoon. So take it more in the morning and afternoon. Right, that makes more sense to me from a kind of day in day out how vitamin D will be made in general. And then the other thing is, if you miss it or you forget it, I think doing it at least getting it in there once a week as a fat soluble vitamin, just make sure you test make sure you’re doing well on that. And like you said having d3 is in the B that’s more of the animal version, I think is a lanolin more of a plant version on the D two side. And the thing with it’s more synthetic and it doesn’t equate to improving your vitamin D levels because as to get converted in the body. So there’s a conversion issue that tends to get lapsed on and it won’t move your vitamin D levels is good.

Evan Brand: I have seen some like vegan D3, I want to say they’re like an algae based product. Yeah, I haven’t looked too much into them. I mean, I have had some vegan clients who were like, Hey, I’m just really opposed to any other source of vitamin D. I’m like, okay, fine, we’ll get you some of the vegan ones. I think it’s a lichen. Maybe a lichen or an algae. I mean, I’m okay with it. But I don’t have enough long term evidence to say where I’ve looked at people and regards to their test results to confirm that their levels we’re getting up from the algae or the like and based one, I’m sure if it’s D3, and it says 5000. I mean, in theory, it’s good enough, but I just haven’t I don’t have enough data to say whether you should go for that or not. I would just go with your typical D3

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 100%. Now vitamin D has a couple of different benefits. You already mentioned a couple things, let’s kind of go over some of the benefits for the listeners. So we already chatted about the the natural antibiotic that’s being produced by vitamin D. It’s called cathelicidin. It’s a kind of an antibacterial enzyme. That’s super helpful at being able to knock down bacteria, okay? It also has antiviral mechanisms as well. It has the antimicrobial peptides, like I mentioned, it also has some antiviral mechanisms. Part of that is it stimulates and can modulate the th one immune response and the th one immune system, that’s where you’re making a lot of your natural killer cells and your helper cells, which are really good. And then also good helper cell can also help you know that your antigen presenting cell can help make antibodies more efficiently. So you’re also going to have better TH2 immune response. So you’re going to make antibodies to whatever that infection is, those tend to come a little bit later in the game, but good signaling to make your antibodies is super helpful as well. I would also say as a couple other studies here that we’re talking about different things, so we have a reduce in our MMP 9 concentrations, we have a reduction in Brady Keinen storm, and our original reduction in our cytokine storm. So basically, we have a lot of inflammatory molecules that get produced, right, Brady keinen cytokines interleukins, MMP9. And basically these are inflammatory type of chemical messengers. And vitamin D can help modulate that and prevent that from being overproduced, which because the more we over produce those, the more our immune system responds, right, and we can create more cytokine storm issues because our immune system kind of is on this positive feedback loop, responding and creating more issues with these cytokines. So we can kind of modulate and bring these cytokines down a bit. And when there’s less cytokines, there’s less chance of a cytokine storm, which is basically our immune system responding. And imagine a fight between two people, you know, one person yells, the other person, that person yells back down, then we’re pushing them we’re shoving, then we’re hitting, and the violence escalates. That’s kind of what happens with the cytokine storm, with your immune system and all the different cytokines and immune chemical signals, so we can keep that modulating a bit, which is very helpful. And vitamin D plays a really important role in that.

Evan Brand: Awesome. I don’t think there’s really, really any other mechanisms that are important for this. I mean, I’m sure there’s other stuff that we could, we could pick out. But, you know, I would argue that, you know, if you’re darker skin in Canada, you’re in trouble. If you’re in New York, you’re in Michigan, you’re in Montana, you’re in Seattle, Washington, I mean, even, you know extremely fair skinned people, Irish people like me, if you’re that far north, and you’re not supplementing, I’ll bet you $1,000 you’re deficient. So it’s pretty easy. It’s pretty easy. This is so easy. But such a game changer. I wish it were the front headlines everywhere.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well, I would at least kind of convince people here just get on vitamin D, from thanksgiving to spring. Yeah, at least do that right, at least make that investment get on vitamin D supplementation from thanksgiving to spring. Or if you want to come off the rest of the year, as long as you’re getting some sunlight, fine, but at least do that that’s gonna give you a good bump. And the fat soluble nutrients, you’ll get over those four or five months, we’ll hang around months afterwards, too, because it takes a while for that for that vitamin D level to build up. Now, what are some symptoms of vitamin D excess. So if you’re not testing and you’re just doing a lot of vitamin D, well, you may have high levels of calcium, you may notice hypercalcemia hyper calcium iya. So if you run a comprehensive metabolic panel, you may see high levels of calcium. You may also notice you’re more nauseous, you’re vomiting, you’re weak, a lot of urination, bone pain, kidney issues, calcium stones, if you’re having any of those symptoms, and you’re not really monitoring your vitamin D, you may want to just double check on that. I’ve also seen clinically that vitamin D toxicity happens less when you have other fat soluble vitamins present. So if you’re noticing that you may want to back off a bit, you may want to really focus on getting good vitamin A and good vitamin K in there, as well, just to make sure you’re not creating a fat soluble vitamin imbalance, I think is a really good kind of thing out of the gates.

Evan Brand: Yeah, that’s pretty easy. Oh, a couple other things I wanted to mention, this is at the top of the the paper you and I were looking at, you already mentioned like benefits for autoimmune diseases like MS. But also in regards to just helping with epigenetic switching. So you know, all this reading here, because it’s pretty simple. Vitamin D is a powerful epigenetic regulator influencing more than 2500 genes. So what that tells me is you and I seriously, we don’t even fully understand what all this benefits. I mean, we have a clue based on knowing how many genes that can positively influence but who knows, you know, you don’t know what you don’t know. So how many other beneficial things are we doing? That science hasn’t even uncovered yet? Probably a ton.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 100% right. So when you talk about the different epigenetic signaling that can happen, that’s pretty powerful, right? Because we know that I think 800 900 It’s a bunch of different DNA, a bunch of different genes are being affected, and so on. It’s important. We don’t know all the things that could be affected. But we do know that if you get your vitamin D levels up, you don’t really have to worry about everything that you’re doing. That’s kind of the, that’s kind of the important component there, you don’t really have to worry about it, you just got to make sure that you’re doing the right thing. And you’re set. And you’re pretty much good to go.

Evan Brand: Yeah, I’ve got my grandfather testing his now I- Well, I’ve got my grandfather, he’s been on vitamin D for several years now. And I’ve got his doctor to the point where he doesn’t question it anymore. He just runs it. So we’ve got him up, we just got his blood work back. He’s up around 60. And he’s doing 5000 units a day, and he’s hanging out around 60. It took a little while to get up there. So we did 10 for a while. And then now we’re just staying at a baseline of five a day. And he’s doing great with it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great. So can you repeat the dose again?

Evan Brand: Yeah, we had him at 5000 a day. For a while we went up to 10, because he was only at around a 30 or 40. So we went up to 10 for a little while. And then we backed him down. So now he’s at a five. So we went five, up to 10 for a while now he’s at a 60. So now we’re just going back down sticking with a baseline of 5000 a day with K and it’s working really well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So my kids, they get some vitamin D out of the gates every single day, which is helpful. And then we make sure they get some cod liver oil. And then they’re also getting some really good fat soluble vitamins via gi and such like that. And so out of the gates here, you know anyone that’s supplementing their kids or their family or friends, just make sure you’re getting other good fat soluble vitamins along with the vitamin D, and you’re going to be pretty darn safe out of the gates. And I would say at least try to do some kind of testing going into the winter and or coming off the winter just to make sure you’re on track.

Evan Brand: Yep, and we’ll put some links below I believe you’ve got a professional vitamin D that you use. I’ve got one that I use, there’s liquid, there are different soft gel capsule versions. So we’ll put a couple links for people if you want to check them out. Once again, this is one of the most cost effective but most health impacting supplements to be using it this time. And I think it should be in your pantry and your cabinet.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Thinks so too. So out of the gates, we talked about all of the immune benefits the immune modulating benefits, we talked about the natural antiviral antibacterial mechanisms. We talked about how they modulate cytokines, decreased chance of a cytokine storm. We talked about the the modulating of all these different chemical messengers. Also important benefits in regarding breathing, right, because we talked about vitamin D can help modulate high levels of angiotensin right. So we have a lot of blood pressure medications, angiotensin converting enzyme medications, right, or ARB right angiotensin receptor site blockers, vitamin D modulates angiotensin two rennen right it modulates it, and that can help with blood pressure. And blood pressure is important, right? Anytime we have respiration issues or breathing issues or blood pressure issues, modulating NAC can help. Alright, I would say the only other thing I really like adding in, especially if I’m having breathing issues outside of vitamin D is throwing either in some Bluetooth ion or some NAC and or both because that can one help reduce mucus when you have less mucus, you have better transfer of oxygen from the alveoli to the bloodstream, right? So you can take oxygen, deoxygenated blood, bring it back in get oxygen, so you just have better transfer of oxygen back into the bloodstream, which is important. And that’s going to help you help you breathe better and it’s gonna help keep your oxygen levels up. If oxygen levels dropped too much, you’re gonna be really fatigued and tired. So the only other thing I would throw in with vitamin D is maybe some NAC and or some glutathione.

Evan Brand: Yeah, well said yeah, oral and or in bigger situations, more problematic situations. nebulised bluetooth ion, we had one client who had a brother who had a lot of issues, got him on the nebulizer with the Bluetooth ion and he was stellar within just a few hours. So I think that is another essential supplement to keep in your pantry.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, I had a patient just last week she’ll probably listen to this podcast, but she had some breathing issues due to a winter cold, some significant breathing issues and she had seen my podcasts and video on using lipids omo or shoot using nebulised bluetooth ion and I my little nebulizer right over here. Right under there. And I use the nebulizer to fire on with some saline solution. And she said right away her ability to breathe and respirate improve right right out of the gates. Oh yeah shows that you know getting really good glutathione obviously orally into your body is low hanging fruit. But if you need to get it internally right to your lungs, there’s a lot of studies on showing how beneficial that is in helping your breathing and just helping to reduce inflammation in your lungs.

Evan Brand: Yes, absolutely. Yeah. My mother in law she had diagnosis of COPD even though she’s never smoked. We think it was due to chemical exposures probably virally. bacterial issues as well. Same thing got her on the nebulizer. She said it’s a game changer she got off of her inhaler completely after using the nebulizer so it’s pretty unreal.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. So what we’ll do is we’ll put some links here we have some vitamin D products and glutathione products that we like and we personally recommend, we’ll put some links here below so if you guys are interested and you want to take a peek and you want to support the podcast, that’s one way to do so. And again we only we only recommend products that we personally use with our family, ourselves and our patients and because we’re in the thick of it rolling up our sleeves dealing with patients clinically every week it’s it’s into our it’s let’s say it’s part of our best interest to have the highest quality product so we can get the highest clinical outcome.

Evan Brand: Totally, totally well if you need help clinically as well if you need advice, we work around the world with people via FaceTime, Skype, phone etc. You can reach out to Dr. J at Justin Health. JustinHealth.com for Dr. J. Me, Evan Brand at EvanBrand.com and we’re available worldwide. So you can use the scheduling links you can book intro calls you can book new client calls, but we are here so please reach out if you need help.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Awesome. Hey Evan excellent chatting with you my man. JustinHealth.com, EvanBrand.com. Sharing is caring if you guys enjoy it please send us a review we really appreciate it. JustinHealth.com/iTunes, EvanBrand.com/iTunes we’ll put a review link below. We really appreciate you guys. Alright, you guys have a phenomenal day. Take control of your health. Keep your immune system strong during the winter months. Take care y’all. Bye now.


References:

https://www.evanbrand.com/

https://justinhealth.com/

Audio Podcast:

https://justinhealth.libsyn.com/enhancing-your-immune-system-with-vitamin-d-podcast-321

Recommended products:

Emulsi D Supreme

Detox Aminos

Vitamin D Blood Test

Activate the Parasympathetic Nervous System to Improve Recovery | Podcast #310

While often overlooked, the role of the nervous system in recovery is paramount. In this video, Dr. J and Jodi Cohen – a bestselling author, award-winning journalist, and founder of Vibrant Blue Oil. They highlight the key physical and mental/emotional factors that stress the nervous system, activate the parasympathetic nervous system for optimal recovery, and how it is connected to your vagus nerve, and how it can affect motility. 

We often hear meditation and massage are two potent techniques to help with physical recovery from exercise and lower the body’s mental stress response. Jodi here also introduce oils that are so stimulatory, most especially to your vagus nerve, which large divisions of this nerve extends to the digestive system. Also, the vagus nerve sends commands (when the body is not under stress)that slow heart and breathing rates and increases digestion. 

Check out this podcast and learn more on how you can apply this to your daily living!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani

Dr. Justin Marchegiani

In this episode, we cover:

0:18     Parasympathetic

3:54     Vibrant and Blue Oils

7:38     Clove and Lime

20:08    Nutrients that Support the Oils

23:02    “Essential Oils to Boost the Brain and Heal the Body”

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Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hey guys, it’s Dr. Justin Marchegiani here really excited to have a awesome podcast guest today Jody Cohen is going to be talking about the parasympathetic summit, which is going to be all about how to promote parasympathetic nervous system, which is about helping your body heal and improve. Jody, welcome to the podcast.

Jodi Cohen: Oh, my God, so honored to be here. Thank you. And I feel like the timing is perfect. For people who don’t really know what parasympathetic is your nervous system, your autonomic nervous system, which controls your automatic functions like breathing, heart re digestion, immunity has kind of two gears, when your body thinks there’s danger and it has to survive, it presses the gas pedal, and kind of routes all of your blood flow and your oxygen to your arms and your legs so that you can either fight back or flee. And then the danger passes, and you hit the brakes, which is the parasympathetic, and everything returns to normal. And it’s kind of like cleaning up after the party, right? You can digest your food, blood flow routes back to your digestion. And what happens especially now when we’re so anxious, you know, anticipatory stress makes the body think it’s in danger, we kind of get stuck in the wrong gear. And so all of those maintenance cleanup health functions, kind of get put on the back burner. And if they stay on the back burner forever, your health kind of suffers.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: People talk about the parasympathetic nervous system, a lot of times that’s connected to the vagus nerve, correct?

Jodi Cohen: Yes, exactly. Your Vegas nerve is really the gearshift between that fight or flight, sympathetic state and the rest and digest parasympathetic state.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, and the Vegas that that terminology means the wanderer, so it’s the nerve that goes from the brainstem and kind of wanders down and it hits all of the, the organs like you talked about a lot of digestive impacts regarding the parasympathetic because we need good HCl and enzyme so like to be able to get access to all of those nutrients. And to break all your proteins and fats and antioxidants down, we need good digestive support and getting into the parasympathetics helps that.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, I could actually the Vegas nerve wanders through every organ of digestion. So it triggers your mouth to release saliva, which helps start to break down those proteins so that they’re better absorbed and your stomach releases hydrochloric acid, it helps the pancreas release digestive enzymes, the gallbladder release bile. And then the most important thing that people don’t know is it kind of helps with the motility wave. Think of it as kind of like, you know, the moving walkway that goes through your system and make sure that things don’t stay too long in your gut and cause like cebo, or, you know, IBS or any problems, you know, and also make sure that you don’t get constipated, so that things leave, so that when you’re kind of stuck in fight or flight sympathetic dominance, all you know that the moving walkway doesn’t go and that’s when problems occur.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So anyone listening to this right now, if you’re liking what you’re hearing, make sure you click down below, we’re gonna put a link for the parasympathetic summit right down below, so make sure you subscribe. I was part of that summit along with a 30 other-

Jodi Cohen: I know, I know. I can’t. Well, you know what it is I am anxious. And so I started really early. And so I had almost everything done a month before the deadline. And then wonderful people like you who I’ve loved and admired said Oh, can I get on? I’m like, oh my god. Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great. That’s Yeah, very cool. So I urge everyone listening to subscribe to get access to that awesome info. So you have a website vibrant and blue oils? Yeah, you use a lot of oils that kind of help people promote healing relaxation. Can you give me like a top three lists that you use to kind of get that parasympathetic nervous response activated? 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah. And I just want to back up the reason I found oils, um, I, my now ex has been attempted suicide and had to be hospitalized. And once I knew he was safe, and it wasn’t my job to keep him alive. I hit rock bottom, the kids were five and seven at the time, so it wasn’t super convenient to sleep all day. And I you know, I knew enough and it was my adrenals I kept trying to ingest remedies to help the adrenals and nothing was working. Um, a friend brought over oils, and I kind of made up a blend that I topically applied for the adrenals and it worked right away. And what I didn’t realize is chronic cortisol leads to inflammation of the gut. So my gut was so damaged, that nothing I was taking, like ingesting was really getting absorbed and assimilated. So that’s how I got into oils because I realized, oh, even if your gut is really messed up, you can still smell things you can still you know, we know that like nicotine patches or hormone creams go in through the skin. So that’s why I got started in oils. And then I started realizing because I’ve been in clinical practice. The blind spots, you know, if someone is deficient in vitamin D, that’s easy. You can supplement with vitamin B, if they’re stuck in parasympathetic or a second sympathetic, that was hard, you know, in a lot of the remedy is that, you know, you can teach people to breathe or meditate people, that’s hard. It’s not like an instant skill, you can say splash your face with freezing water, you know, which causes the blood flow to come to warm it up. People don’t like it either. It’s uncomfortable. They didn’t like gagging cells with a tongue depressor. But what I realized because the anatomy of the vagus nerve, as you said, it starts at the back of the head. And then it splits and whines around both sides. And it’s actually most accessible and the thickest, kind of right here. Like if you touch behind your earlobe, on your master bone. It’s like the width of a piano court there, you know, and it’s smaller and other places. So that’s why they actually do this kind of surgery, it’s a little bit like a pacemaker surgery. And they implant an electrical device here, and then a battery down below me, it’s pretty invasive. But you can use oils, oils are super stimulatory like clove, which has a million other benefits. And then lime has really small molecules, it’s kind of like, you know, when you combine colors, you can take blue and red, put them together and you get purple, which is different than you can add white and make it lavender. You know, you can combine oils, and it kind of draws the best from both of them. So I created this blend, parasympathetic, that’s clothing line. And what’s super cool is, you know, you might not be able to deep breathe, you might struggle with meditation and fall asleep, but you can dab a little thing right here, you can carry this in your purse, this is a really easy thing to comply with. And then you feel better. You’re like, Okay, I’m not constipated. Okay, my I don’t feel bloated. Okay, I feel a little bit like calmer and less anxious. You know, and, as you know, like the supplements that people know, help them, like they feel less tired. They’re really good at compliance. Once you figure out this is working for me, you’re all in.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And it’s a good replacement. For some people, they’re they’re already used to like reaching for a medication, well, let’s try something a little bit more natural. That’s going to have a good benefit. It’s not going to have the side effects. And it’s the least you know, good step to other healthy things. I imagine. Yes. What you’re doing oils, you’re probably now thinking about the food you’re eating and other Yes, your habits too. So it kind of creates an awareness, I imagine as well.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, and definitely that cascade. Yeah. You know, it’s like crawl before you walk, walk before you run. Yeah. Once you’re like, Okay, I did that, like I used to in yoga. You know, sometimes these teachers would be so sneaky and suddenly you’re doing like a handstand or headstand. And you’re like, had no idea I could do that. What else can I do?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right? That’s awesome. Very cool. Yeah, you have that parasympathetic lead, I think you say clove and lime. Is that true?

Jodi Cohen: Yeah. Yeah. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I would think like, you’d have maybe like a lavender or something like that. I’m just curious what your –

Jodi Cohen: Well, you know, originally, no, no, and a lot of people that’s a great question. Originally, I was thinking like, Oh, it’s parasympathetic. It should be sedated. You know, when oils like lavender Kammen meal. No, we know that they’re all relaxing, you know, frankincense, even the resins? Yeah, um, but I realized that what it is, is you need to stimulate it. It’s kind of like, if you think about, you know, the old cars, we actually have to manually shift gears is to do something active and energizing to kind of change lanes. So this stimulates the vagus nerve, and in stimulating it, it’s like, oh, you know, I’m switching gears. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And you’re using that access point, with the nerves a little bit more superficial and more Yes, to get access to it.

Jodi Cohen: Exactly, exactly. And the other cool thing is, um, you know, there’s a researcher out of tufts Michael Vanek, or talks about the vagus nerve infection hypothesis. And basically, it’s this idea that the vagus nerve has such a broad depth and you know, it gets into your system everywhere. So any kind of small minor infection can basically the body can pick it up as you’re infected, and it goes into like cell danger response or sickness response. So you get tired so you don’t move chronic fatigue syndrome, you have pain so you don’t move fibromyalgia. A lot of these things can be traced to an infection in the Vegas nerve and the most likely one of the doctors on the summit, Marco Rubio, he did this extensive research where he was taking ultrasounds of people’s necks, and he was finding that often the Vegas nerve was infected there because, you know, we have all these toxins in our mouth that drain out and you know, and they’re exacerbated if you have like metal amalgams or any kind of cavitation you know, that has been compromised your root canal. So think about, you know, congestion point a bottleneck. You have toxins draining along the trigeminal nerve, they intersect with the Vegas nerve, you know, the neck has the structure of the limb, the blood vessels, the nerves, you know, any kind of compromise if you know as a chiropractor if things Aren’t flowing that can get congested. So the toxins accumulate here. clove actually has, it has this constituent called eugenol. And it’s been used in dentistry for years because it does two things. It numbs the pain and it actually helps to address the underlying toxins. So if there is a toxicity or an infection, that’s, you know, think of it like you’re on an airplane, right? If you’re in a row of seats, and you’re in the middle row, and the people on either side of you are not petite people, you’re not getting that armrest, you know, you’re really compressed and congested. So if the Vegas nerve is congested, it’s bumping into the vascular system, you’re not getting the blood flow, it’s bumping into the lymph, you’re not getting the drainage. So anything you can do and Dr. Russo actually walks you through step by step, how they started to, you know, topically apply remedies to cause less congestion in the lymph and all of a sudden the Vegas nerve. You can see it in the pictures. It’s kind of amazing. What kind of evidence was he doing his trials. He was using Christine sharpeners, he created their Sophia flow cream, which is a combination of essential oils and then other remedies. But what’s interesting is that most people don’t think about topically, you know, most people are kind of like have lymphie need to dry better shirt rebounder, you know that we don’t really have anything for that. But we do. It’s these topically applied remedies, we actually have a limp oil. It’s a lot of menten and things that kind of help open up vasculature and drainage. And she uses some oils in her product too. They’re both good, right? You know, it’s kinda like you get out there, right? Yeah, exactly. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: There’s a lot of ways you can skin a cat so to speak. Did you choose those oils? Was it your own clinical experience? Was it research that you saw? How did that? 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, that’s a good question. So the reason I got into nutrition was my own squirmy kid. You know, my first kid was super easy. I just assumed I was this great. Mom had another 120 minutes later.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I’ve seen that having two kids now I know exactly what you’re talking about.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah. And he was just wild, a wild child. Like I really thought, like, you know, like, you have the parenting baby proof people come to your house. And they’re like, and here’s this oven lock, because some kids climb in the oven, you know, and with my first one is like, no, no kid, kid climbs in the oven. Oh, number two, you just like that, that I had that kid that did those things. And a friend noticed that he was being really well behaved. And then another mom handed out like a Ritz cracker and he Jekyll Hyde. And she said, You know, my brother was on Ritalin his whole life. And it turns out, he was just allergic to weird foods, you should check that out. I thought, I’ve done everything else, I can certainly do that. And we took them to nutritionist. She said he’s really sensitive to corn, soy and dairy. So we changed his diet. And we had a different kid the next day. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. And I was like, how did I not know this? So I went back and got a degree in nutrition was trying to work with other screaming kids. And I mean, you know, like, if they can’t, if they’re wiggling all over it, it’s really hard to like, assess them. So I learned this technique called muscle testing, that’s a really good way to kind of ask the body questions, and it’s what I was doing in my practice to help identify what remedies were good for kids. And so when I first got introduced to oils, I was really, I have never been at this kind of rock bottom, like just so mentally and physically exhausted, like literally getting up to do anything felt like a strain. So, you know, someone gave me this box, and I’m so drained, I’m like, all right, I can muscle test. So basically, it’s intuition I muscle test I, every we have a blueprint in the body, right? There’s a blueprint for what healthy adrenal tissue is supposed to look like. And sometimes you do things and you don’t really realize that’s what you’re doing. That’s what I’ve been doing my practice the whole time is kind of identifying what organisms stress, and then using supplements to help return that organ to balance so it would function well. And so that was kind of the lens that I was looking through when I was making these formulas. So I was like, Alright, what what combination, you know, we humans have a blueprint. And plants also have blueprints. And humans and plants are bio familiar. So we share similar blueprints. So kind of like you can combine different colors to you know, match a picture in a landscape, you can combine different oils to match the blueprint of a healthy organ. So I was using intuition to come up with the formulation, you know, for a start, kind of identify this needs to be in it. And then I would play with what you know, 10% of this 20% of this, the different variables and then I have a team of people that kind of help me test it, and they test and then they can kind of mentally say like you We increase, you know, the Roman kameel from, you know, 12% to 13. So we’re just constantly refining and tweaking it. And then I go and I research, you know, okay, why? Why does balsam of Peru, which is a resin that’s drawn from these plants in you know, the Amazon in Peru and Brazil seem to help with sleep? What chemical constituents are present in this plant? Why is it working? And I would every single time be like, Oh, that makes complete sense. Why this is helping. And so that’s, that’s my process. It’s a little bit nutty, but it always seems to work.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Interesting. And you know, I also, I’m just curious, though, with your son, what were the oils that really helped because one thing I like about oils with kids, is some kids don’t want to swallow stuff. And they may be something in reverse, right? So it’s hard to get them to do stuff. So you can kind of covertly put some on your fingers rub their behind their ears and kind of get it in their bloodstream. So I like that what oils that you found were the best on on Macs. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hey guys, it’s Dr. Justin Marchegiani here really excited to have a awesome podcast guest today Jody Cohen is going to be talking about the parasympathetic summit, which is going to be all about how to promote parasympathetic nervous system, which is about helping your body heal and improve. Jody, welcome to the podcast.

Jodi Cohen: Oh, my God, so honored to be here. Thank you. And I feel like the timing is perfect. For people who don’t really know what parasympathetic is your nervous system, your autonomic nervous system, which controls your automatic functions like breathing, heart re digestion, immunity has kind of two gears, when your body thinks there’s danger and it has to survive, it presses the gas pedal, and kind of routes all of your blood flow and your oxygen to your arms and your legs so that you can either fight back or flee. And then the danger passes, and you hit the brakes, which is the parasympathetic, and everything returns to normal. And it’s kind of like cleaning up after the party, right? You can digest your food, blood flow routes back to your digestion. And what happens especially now when we’re so anxious, you know, anticipatory stress makes the body think it’s in danger, we kind of get stuck in the wrong gear. And so all of those maintenance cleanup health functions, kind of get put on the back burner. And if they stay on the back burner forever, your health kind of suffers.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: People talk about the parasympathetic nervous system, a lot of times that’s connected to the vagus nerve, correct?

Jodi Cohen: Yes, exactly. Your Vegas nerve is really the gearshift between that fight or flight, sympathetic state and the rest and digest parasympathetic state.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, and the Vegas that that terminology means the wanderer, so it’s the nerve that goes from the brainstem and kind of wanders down and it hits all of the, the organs like you talked about a lot of digestive impacts regarding the parasympathetic because we need good HCl and enzyme so like to be able to get access to all of those nutrients. And to break all your proteins and fats and antioxidants down, we need good digestive support and getting into the parasympathetics helps that.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, I could actually the Vegas nerve wanders through every organ of digestion. So it triggers your mouth to release saliva, which helps start to break down those proteins so that they’re better absorbed and your stomach releases hydrochloric acid, it helps the pancreas release digestive enzymes, the gallbladder release bile. And then the most important thing that people don’t know is it kind of helps with the motility wave. Think of it as kind of like, you know, the moving walkway that goes through your system and make sure that things don’t stay too long in your gut and cause like cebo, or, you know, IBS or any problems, you know, and also make sure that you don’t get constipated, so that things leave, so that when you’re kind of stuck in fight or flight sympathetic dominance, all you know that the moving walkway doesn’t go and that’s when problems occur.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So anyone listening to this right now, if you’re liking what you’re hearing, make sure you click down below, we’re gonna put a link for the parasympathetic summit right down below, so make sure you subscribe. I was part of that summit along with a 30 other-

Jodi Cohen: I know, I know. I can’t. Well, you know what it is I am anxious. And so I started really early. And so I had almost everything done a month before the deadline. And then wonderful people like you who I’ve loved and admired said Oh, can I get on? I’m like, oh my god. Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great. That’s Yeah, very cool. So I urge everyone listening to subscribe to get access to that awesome info. So you have a website vibrant and blue oils? Yeah, you use a lot of oils that kind of help people promote healing relaxation. Can you give me like a top three lists that you use to kind of get that parasympathetic nervous response activated? 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah. And I just want to back up the reason I found oils, um, I, my now ex has been attempted suicide and had to be hospitalized. And once I knew he was safe, and it wasn’t my job to keep him alive. I hit rock bottom, the kids were five and seven at the time, so it wasn’t super convenient to sleep all day. And I you know, I knew enough and it was my adrenals I kept trying to ingest remedies to help the adrenals and nothing was working. Um, a friend brought over oils, and I kind of made up a blend that I topically applied for the adrenals and it worked right away. And what I didn’t realize is chronic cortisol leads to inflammation of the gut. So my gut was so damaged, that nothing I was taking, like ingesting was really getting absorbed and assimilated. So that’s how I got into oils because I realized, oh, even if your gut is really messed up, you can still smell things you can still you know, we know that like nicotine patches or hormone creams go in through the skin. So that’s why I got started in oils. And then I started realizing because I’ve been in clinical practice The blind spots, you know, if someone’s deficient in vitamin D, that’s easy. You can supplement with vitamin B, if they’re stuck in parasympathetic or a second sympathetic, that was hard, you know, in a lot of the remedy is that, you know, you can teach people to breathe or meditate people, that’s hard. It’s not like an instant skill, you can say splash your face with freezing water, you know, which causes the blood flow to come to warm it up. People don’t like it either. It’s uncomfortable. They didn’t like gagging cells with a tongue depressor. But what I realized because the anatomy of the vagus nerve, as you said, it starts at the back of the head. And then it splits and whines around both sides. And it’s actually most accessible and the thickest, kind of right here. Like if you touch behind your earlobe, on your master bone. It’s like the width of a piano court there, you know, and it’s smaller and other places. So that’s why they actually do this kind of surgery, it’s a little bit like a pacemaker surgery. And they implant an electrical device here, and then a battery down below me, it’s pretty invasive. But you can use oils, oils are super stimulatory like clove, which has a million other benefits. And then lime has really small molecules, it’s kind of like, you know, when you combine colors, you can take blue and red, put them together and you get purple, which is different than you can add white and make it lavender. You know, you can combine oils, and it kind of draws the best from both of them. So I created this blend, parasympathetic, that’s clothing line. And what’s super cool is, you know, you might not be able to deep breathe, you might struggle with meditation and fall asleep, but you can dab a little thing right here, you can carry this in your purse, this is a really easy thing to comply with. And then you feel better. You’re like, Okay, I’m not constipated. Okay, my I don’t feel bloated. Okay, I feel a little bit like calmer and less anxious. You know, and, as you know, like the supplements that people know, help them, like they feel less tired. They’re really good at compliance. Once you figure out this is working for me, you’re all in.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And it’s a good replacement. For some people, they’re they’re already used to like reaching for a medication, well, let’s try something a little bit more natural. That’s going to have a good benefit. It’s not going to have the side effects. And it’s the least you know, good step to other healthy things. I imagine. Yes. What you’re doing oils, you’re probably now thinking about the food you’re eating and other Yes, your habits too. So it kind of creates an awareness, I imagine as well.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, and definitely that cascade. Yeah. You know, it’s like crawl before you walk, walk before you run. Yeah. Once you’re like, Okay, I did that, like I used to in yoga. You know, sometimes these teachers would be so sneaky and suddenly you’re doing like a handstand or headstand. And you’re like, had no idea I could do that. What else can I do?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right? That’s awesome. Very cool. Yeah, you have that parasympathetic lead, I think you say clove and lime. Is that true.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah. Yeah. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I would think like, you’d have maybe like a lavender or something like that. I’m just curious what your –

Jodi Cohen: Well, you know, originally, no, no, and a lot of people that’s a great question. Originally, I was thinking like, Oh, it’s parasympathetic. It should be sedated. You know, when oils like lavender Kammen meal. No, we know that they’re all relaxing, you know, frankincense, even the resins? Yeah, um, but I realized that what it is, is you need to stimulate it. It’s kind of like, if you think about, you know, the old cars, we actually have to manually shift gears is to do something active and energizing to kind of change lanes. So this stimulates the vagus nerve, and in stimulating it, it’s like, oh, you know, I’m switching gears. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And you’re using that access point, with the nerves a little bit more superficial and more Yes, to get access to it.

Jodi Cohen: Exactly, exactly. And the other cool thing is, um, you know, there’s a researcher out of tufts Michael Vanek, or talks about the vagus nerve infection hypothesis. And basically, it’s this idea that the vagus nerve has such a broad depth and you know, it gets into your system everywhere. So any kind of small minor infection can basically the body can pick it up as you’re infected, and it goes into like cell danger response or sickness response. So you get tired so you don’t move chronic fatigue syndrome, you have pain so you don’t move fibromyalgia. A lot of these things can be traced to an infection in the Vegas nerve and the most likely one of the doctors on the summit, Marco Rubio, he did this extensive research where he was taking ultrasounds of people’s necks, and he was finding that often the Vegas nerve was infected there because, you know, we have all these toxins in our mouth that drain out and you know, and they’re exacerbated if you have like metal amalgams or any kind of cavitation you know, that has been compromised your root canal. So think about, you know, congestion point a bottleneck. You have toxins draining along the trigeminal nerve, they intersect with the Vegas nerve, you know, the neck has the structure of the limb, the blood vessels, the nerves, you know, any kind of compromise if you know as a chiropractor if things Aren’t flowing that can get congested. So the toxins accumulate here. clove actually has, it has this constituent called eugenol. And it’s been used in dentistry for years because it does two things. It numbs the pain and it actually helps to address the underlying toxins. So if there is a toxicity or an infection, that’s, you know, think of it like you’re on an airplane, right? If you’re in a row of seats, and you’re in the middle row, and the people on either side of you are not petite people, you’re not getting that armrest, you know, you’re really compressed and congested. So if the Vegas nerve is congested, it’s bumping into the vascular system, you’re not getting the blood flow, it’s bumping into the lymph, you’re not getting the drainage. So anything you can do and Dr. Russo actually walks you through step by step, how they started to, you know, topically apply remedies to cause less congestion in the lymph and all of a sudden the Vegas nerve. You can see it in the pictures. It’s kind of amazing. What kind of evidence was he doing his trials. He was using Christine sharpeners, he created their Sophia flow cream, which is a combination of essential oils and then other remedies. But what’s interesting is that most people don’t think about topically, you know, most people are kind of like have lymphie need to dry better shirt rebounder, you know that we don’t really have anything for that. But we do. It’s these topically applied remedies, we actually have a limp oil. It’s a lot of menten and things that kind of help open up vasculature and drainage. And she uses some oils in her product too. They’re both good, right? You know, it’s kinda like you get out there, right? Yeah, exactly. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: There’s a lot of ways you can skin a cat so to speak. Did you choose those oils? Was it your own clinical experience? Was it research that you saw? How did that? 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, that’s a good question. So the reason I got into nutrition was my own squirmy kid. You know, my first kid was super easy. I just assumed I was this great. Mom had another 120 minutes later.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I’ve seen that having two kids now I know exactly what you’re talking about.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah. And he was just wild, a wild child. Like I really thought, like, you know, like, you have the parenting baby proof people come to your house. And they’re like, and here’s this oven lock, because some kids climb in the oven, you know, and with my first one is like, no, no kid, kid climbs in the oven. Oh, number two, you just like that, that I had that kid that did those things. And a friend noticed that he was being really well behaved. And then another mom handed out like a Ritz cracker and he Jekyll Hyde. And she said, You know, my brother was on Ritalin his whole life. And it turns out, he was just allergic to weird foods, you should check that out. I thought, I’ve done everything else, I can certainly do that. And we took them to nutritionist. She said he’s really sensitive to corn, soy and dairy. So we changed his diet. And we had a different kid the next day. Wow. Yeah. Yeah. And I was like, how did I not know this? So I went back and got a degree in nutrition was trying to work with other screaming kids. And I mean, you know, like, if they can’t, if they’re wiggling all over it, it’s really hard to like, assess them. So I learned this technique called muscle testing, that’s a really good way to kind of ask the body questions, and it’s what I was doing in my practice to help identify what remedies were good for kids. And so when I first got introduced to oils, I was really, I have never been at this kind of rock bottom, like just so mentally and physically exhausted, like literally getting up to do anything felt like a strain. So, you know, someone gave me this box, and I’m so drained, I’m like, all right, I can muscle test. So basically, it’s intuition I muscle test I, every we have a blueprint in the body, right? There’s a blueprint for what healthy adrenal tissue is supposed to look like. And sometimes you do things and you don’t really realize that’s what you’re doing. That’s what I’ve been doing my practice the whole time is kind of identifying what organisms stress, and then using supplements to help return that organ to balance so it would function well. And so that was kind of the lens that I was looking through when I was making these formulas. So I was like, Alright, what what combination, you know, we humans have a blueprint. And plants also have blueprints. And humans and plants are bio familiar. So we share similar blueprints. So kind of like you can combine different colors to you know, match a picture in a landscape, you can combine different oils to match the blueprint of a healthy organ. So I was using intuition to come up with the formulation, you know, for a start, kind of identify this needs to be in it. And then I would play with what you know, 10% of this 20% of this, the different variables and then I have a team of people that kind of help me test it, and they test and then they can kind of mentally say like you We increase, you know, the Roman kameel from, you know, 12% to 13. So we’re just constantly refining and tweaking it. And then I go and I research, you know, okay, why? Why does balsam of Peru, which is a resin that’s drawn from these plants in you know, the Amazon in Peru and Brazil seem to help with sleep? What chemical constituents are present in this plant? Why is it working? And I would every single time be like, Oh, that makes complete sense. Why this is helping. And so that’s, that’s my process. It’s a little bit nutty, but it always seems to work.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Interesting. And you know, I also, I’m just curious, though, with your son, what were the oils that really helped because one thing I like about oils with kids, is some kids don’t want to swallow stuff. And they may be something in reverse, right? So it’s hard to get them to do stuff. So you can kind of covertly put some on your fingers rub their behind their ears and kind of get it in their bloodstream. So I like that what oils that you found were the best on on Macs. 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, so I definitely use parasympathetic. But you know, kids are so intuitive. Like, I think as we get older, we forget or we feel uncomfortable that you know, when the phone’s ringing, we somehow know it’s going to be our mother or, you know, we lose track of that. So with kids, I always kind of do a smell bar and I let them pick whatever they like best he loved orange. And orange is, you know, all of the citrus blends are really calming. And they also help with focus. And you know, a lot of them that are expensive, like Neroli and bergama. You know, those are kind of touted, but orange is super affordable, and kids love it. So he would like to smell that we’d have him do that before he did homework. You know, I give him a little foot rub before bed. But that was just I just let him pick it That was his favorite. But the ones that helped him the most. Definitely parasympathetic adrenal, because he’d get really wire you know, he was like a firecracker. He was always on. So just helping him to calm down. And then sometimes like liver because he, you know, he he inherited my ashkenazic liver, which is, you know, I think the reason that a lot of the traditional Jewish foods are like beets, borscht, chopped liver, you know, we eat all of the foods that we need so that our liver actually works because I think we have a little bit of a genetic detriment-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: When you use that adrenal and liver, what would those oils be to support those organs? 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, I have it all listed out on my site. But and actually in the I have a book coming out in March of 2016, that I’m going to share the recipes because with COVID It breaks my heart, you know, you really can’t get anything into Australia these days. And it’s super hard to get things to Europe and I and India and I have these people that are like I think my, my poor husband could really benefit and I’m like, Oh my gosh, I’m just going to give out the recipe. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s March 2021. Right? 

Jodi Cohen: March 2021, March 16. It’s an essential oils to boost the brain and heal the body. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Awesome. That’s great. So what else can people do? We talked about parasympathetics. Right. We know the adrenal plays a major role and different things. Obviously, food nutrition can help with that. What are some things clinically they use? Yeah, clients or on the oil side that you see adrenals.

Jodi Cohen: So Titus, two, who’s a colleague and a functional neurologist, which means that he is looking at what part of the brain You know, it was cute. At one point, I took my son to a functional neurologist, and he had all these little personality things that I thought were him, you know, like he couldn’t walk a straight line to save his life. He would like what diagonal Walker, he would always spill stuff on himself, he had no spatial awareness. And it turns out, his left brain was much more dominant than his right hemisphere of the brain. So we have Dr. Robert millio, who really talks about using oils to kind of balance the hemispheres. And to kind of a quick parasympathetic trick Titus two talks about how anxiety and panic attacks is over activation of your right frontal lobe. And so to kind of calm and balance that you then activate the left frontal lobe, and that puts the two hemispheres in balance. And functional neurologists use essential oils a lot in their practice, because your your nose, your olfactory nerve, you know, number one goes directly to you know, sometimes in the body, the right brain controls the left body, your olfactory channels go directly to this frontal part. Yeah, exactly. So you can just smell something, you know, it can be anything you like, it can be lavender, it can be orange, it can be parasympathetic, you know, you can actually like dry breathing, plug one nostril, smell through the left nostril, that activates the left frontal lobe balances the brain, you feel less anxious. I anxiety is my thing. My daughter’s thing too. I have panic attacks, I have all these things and that always helps you I basically, even if I’m walking my dog, this is in my pocket in case I need it. So that is my favorite quick fix. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: What about high levels of cortisol? Obviously, high levels of cortisol can cause anxiety, right? So you mentioned maybe that plays a big role. Anything you do to help with the high adrenaline or high cortisol state? Yeah, add any like nutrients in to kind of be supportive to those oils. 

Jodi Cohen: I mean, there are tons of nutrients that are helpful. And you know, if you’re able to digest like, there are a lot of adaptogenic herbs that I love, like ashwagandha rhodiola. But one thing that I’ve, I think that oils work like adaptogenic herbs, like one of the things, you know, I’ve done those 24 hour cortisol tests where you’re spitting in the tube. And what I found is that it’s not flatline. It’s not like my cortisol level is either too high all the time or too low all the time. You know, it’s too high at night when I’m trying to go to sleep and too low in the morning when I need energy. Exactly, exactly. Yeah. And you know, if you think about the nutrients that you can take the supplements, you kind of have to turn it right. You know, like, if you’re already too high, and you’re taking something that makes it higher, that’s not going to be such a positive experience. So with oils, we have two blends. One is the adrenal blend that just kind of evens you out. If you’re too high, it takes it down or too low brings you up, and then one for the hypothalamus. And this is something that most people don’t talk about, they just assume that all cortisol is related to the adrenals, not realizing that it’s a bit of a cascade, the hypothalamus, pituitary axis, your hypothalamus in your brain controls all your endocrine organs, it’s constantly reading the environment and signals in your body to figure out how do we return it to balance you know, like, when you’re driving, at one point, you might be a little too far to the left. So you just course correct, your hypothalamus is your course corrector. And it does that by sending chemical messages to kind of the COO, the one who executes your pituitary gland, which then sends message to your thyroid, your adrenals, all of your endocrine organs. So sometimes it’s called this negative feedback loop, the hypothalamus sends these messages out, then messages come back. And it kind of course, corrects, like, oh, we’re good on cortisol, we don’t need more. And if the, you know, the hypothalamus is kind of overwhelmed, you know, like, my friend likes to say you can’t move along when the house is on fire, you know, if there’s so much going on, it can be like your phone, and it just doesn’t get the right information and send things out. So we have a blend, it’s hard to get things into the brain. I mean, that’s the biggest challenge. And the biggest Aha, with oils, they’re super small and fat soluble. So they cross the blood brain barrier. So we have one, it contains pine, which has a lot of research on it, but you just put it right here. And it’s almost like it sends the right frequency, the right blueprint, whatever you want to call it, to return the hypothalamus to balance so that it’s then sending better messages to the adrenal so that you’re not so hyper cortisol or hyper cortisol.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s good. Excellent. Yeah. So you got your book coming out this March 16 2021, what’s the book gonna be called?

Jodi Cohen: It’s called “Essential Oils to Boost the Brain and Heal the Body.” And you can grab it on Amazon presale, Amazon pre sells anything, you know, you basically they match the best price ever. So if you if you’re a bargain shopper, and we’re actually going to have a gift card so that you can add a stocking stuffers so that if you want to buy the book, you know, we’ll send you a little coupon that you can put into the stocking with like a deal on getting an oil like parasympathetic to go with it. It’s great.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, and your favorite so far as what parasympathetic. 

Jodi Cohen: I love parasympathetic. And honestly, with everything that’s going on, we have a blend called circulation that has a lot of Cyprus, I’ve found and a lot of clinicians have found like, if you’re concerned about getting sick, Cyprus does a really wonderful job of kind of protecting the lung lining. So, you know, they talk about this current concern, it kind of happens in two phases, right? It either gets into the lungs and the lungs lining a solid and it doesn’t go any further and it was a minor cold, or it gets into your system and causes a cytokine storm. So you kind of want to make sure that that bouncer at the gate of your lungs is really working well. And so the circulation oil, I just put over my lungs and also helps if I need to, I’m on deadline and I have to get something done. I put a little bit at the base of my skull, because that improves oxygen flow in the blood and when you have more blood and more oxygen flow, it’s easier to focus. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love that. That’s awesome. Very cool. Well, any other clinical pearls so we have the parasympathetic summit, um, in that but other great speakers 50 Plus you said we’ll put the link down below so if you guys are loving it, click down below make sure you register. We also got the link for Jodi’s website, vibrantblueoils.com those are gonna be there for you as well. March 16 2021, we’ll get the book up there pre presale Amazon like anything else. Go you know, listen to the show. Listen with?

Jodi Cohen: You know what’s funny? Like we’re about to come into Thanksgiving, holiday gratitude. And the fastest way that you can shift yourself into parasympathetic is mindset and gratitude. So if you’re worried about what’s going on in the world, just focus on what you’re grateful for. It could be something as simple as the ability to move your body and to take a breath and to have you know, it’s a gorgeous day here in Seattle to have a sunny sky, you know? Yep. So, you know, I guess I would just like to leave on that. Note that how you choose to experience the world is in your control, and you can always be grateful for things.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I like it. Yeah. When you need the world to kind of conform to the things that you want, then you tend to be like, let down yeah. When you can basically put your focus on the things that you want to appreciate, right? Yeah, in the driver’s seat. So like, that’s definitely an empowering. 

Jodi Cohen: Yes. Yes. You always get to be you always are in control of how you feel and how you think. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well, thanks so much, Jody, head over to vibrantblueoils.com, parasympathetic summit links down below. Hope you guys enjoyed today’s podcast. Have a good one. Jodi, great chatting with you.

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, so I definitely use parasympathetic. But you know, kids are so intuitive. Like, I think as we get older, we forget or we feel uncomfortable that you know, when the phone’s ringing, we somehow know it’s going to be our mother or, you know, we lose track of that. So with kids, I always kind of do a smell bar and I let them pick whatever they like best he loved orange. And orange is, you know, all of the citrus blends are really calming. And they also help with focus. And you know, a lot of them that are expensive, like Neroli and bergama. You know, those are kind of touted, but orange is super affordable, and kids love it. So he would like to smell that we’d have him do that before he did homework. You know, I give him a little foot rub before bed. But that was just I just let him pick it That was his favorite. But the ones that helped him the most. Definitely parasympathetic adrenal, because he’d get really wire you know, he was like a firecracker. He was always on. So just helping him to calm down. And then sometimes like liver because he, you know, he he inherited my ashkenazic liver, which is, you know, I think the reason that a lot of the traditional Jewish foods are like beets, borscht, chopped liver, you know, we eat all of the foods that we need so that our liver actually works because I think we have a little bit of a genetic detriment-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: When you use that adrenal and liver, what would those oils be to support those organs? 

Jodi Cohen: Yeah, I have it all listed out on my site. But and actually in the I have a book coming out in March of 2016, that I’m going to share the recipes because with COVID It breaks my heart, you know, you really can’t get anything into Australia these days. And it’s super hard to get things to Europe and I and India and I have these people that are like I think my, my poor husband could really benefit and I’m like, Oh my gosh, I’m just going to give out the recipe. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s March 2021. Right? 

Jodi Cohen: March 2021, March 16. It’s an essential oils to boost the brain and heal the body. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Awesome. That’s great. So what else can people do? We talked about parasympathetics. Right. We know the adrenal is play a major role and different things. Obviously, food nutrition can help with that. What are some things clinically they use? Yeah, clients or on the oil side that you see adrenals.

Jodi Cohen: So Titus, two, who’s a colleague and a functional neurologist, which means that he is looking at what part of the brain You know, it was cute. At one point, I took my son to a functional neurologist, and he had all these little personality things that I thought were him, you know, like he couldn’t walk a straight line to save his life. He would like what diagonal Walker, he would always spill stuff on himself, he had no spatial awareness. And it turns out, his left brain was much more dominant than his right hemisphere of the brain. So we have Dr. Robert millio, who really talks about using oils to kind of balance the hemispheres. And to kind of a quick parasympathetic trick Titus two talks about how anxiety and panic attacks is over activation of your right frontal lobe. And so to kind of calm and balance that you then activate the left frontal lobe, and that puts the two hemispheres in balance. And functional neurologists use essential oils a lot in their practice, because your your nose, your olfactory nerve, you know, number one goes directly to you know, sometimes in the body, the right brain controls the left body, your olfactory channels go directly to this frontal part. Yeah, exactly. So you can just smell something, you know, it can be anything you like, it can be lavender, it can be orange, it can be parasympathetic, you know, you can actually like dry breathing, plug one nostril, smell through the left nostril, that activates the left frontal lobe balances the brain, you feel less anxious. I anxiety is my thing. My daughter’s thing too. I have panic attacks, I have all these things and that always helps you I basically, even if I’m walking my dog, this is in my pocket in case I need it. So that is my favorite quick fix. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: What about high levels of cortisol? Obviously, high levels of cortisol can cause anxiety, right? So you mentioned maybe that plays a big role. Anything you do to help with the high adrenaline or high cortisol state? Yeah, add any like nutrients in to kind of be supportive to those oils. 

Jodi Cohen: I mean, there are tons of nutrients that are helpful. And you know, if you’re able to digest like, there are a lot of adaptogenic herbs that I love, like ashwagandha rhodiola. But one thing that I’ve, I think that oils work like adaptogenic herbs, like one of the things, you know, I’ve done those 24 hour cortisol tests where you’re spitting in the tube. And what I found is that it’s not flatline. It’s not like my cortisol level is either too high all the time or too low all the time. You know, it’s too high at night when I’m trying to go to sleep and too low in the morning when I need energy. Exactly, exactly. Yeah. And you know, if you think about the nutrients that you can take the supplements, you kind of have to turn it right. You know, like, if you’re already too high, and you’re taking something that makes it higher, that’s not going to be such a positive experience. So with oils, we have two blends. One is the adrenal blend that just kind of evens you out. If you’re too high, it takes it down or too low brings you up, and then one for the hypothalamus. And this is something that most people don’t talk about, they just assume that all cortisol is related to the adrenals, not realizing that it’s a bit of a cascade, the hypothalamus, pituitary axis, your hypothalamus in your brain controls all your endocrine organs, it’s constantly reading the environment and signals in your body to figure out how do we return it to balance you know, like, when you’re driving, at one point, you might be a little too far to the left. So you just course correct, your hypothalamus is your course corrector. And it does that by sending chemical messages to kind of the COO, the one who executes your pituitary gland, which then sends message to your thyroid, your adrenals, all of your endocrine organs. So sometimes it’s called this negative feedback loop, the hypothalamus sends these messages out, then messages come back. And it kind of course, corrects, like, oh, we’re good on cortisol, we don’t need more. And if the, you know, the hypothalamus is kind of overwhelmed, you know, like, my friend likes to say you can’t move along when the house is on fire, you know, if there’s so much going on, it can be like your phone, and it just doesn’t get the right information and send things out. So we have a blend, it’s hard to get things into the brain. I mean, that’s the biggest challenge. And the biggest Aha, with oils, they’re super small and fat soluble. So they cross the blood brain barrier. So we have one, it contains pine, which has a lot of research on it, but you just put it right here. And it’s almost like it sends the right frequency, the right blueprint, whatever you want to call it, to return the hypothalamus to balance so that it’s then sending better messages to the adrenal so that you’re not so hyper cortisol or hyper cortisol.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s good. Excellent. Yeah. So you got your book coming out this March 16 2021, what’s the book gonna be called?

Jodi Cohen: It’s called “Essential Oils to Boost the Brain and Heal the Body.” And you can grab it on Amazon presale, Amazon pre sells anything, you know, you basically they match the best price ever. So if you if you’re a bargain shopper, and we’re actually going to have a gift card so that you can add a stocking stuffers so that if you want to buy the book, you know, we’ll send you a little coupon that you can put into the stocking with like a deal on getting an oil like parasympathetic to go with it. It’s great.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, and your favorite so far as what parasympathetic. 

Jodi Cohen: I love parasympathetic. And honestly, with everything that’s going on, we have a blend called circulation that has a lot of Cyprus, I’ve found and a lot of clinicians have found like, if you’re concerned about getting sick, Cyprus does a really wonderful job of kind of protecting the lung lining. So, you know, they talk about this current concern, it kind of happens in two phases, right? It either gets into the lungs and the lungs lining a solid and it doesn’t go any further and it was a minor cold, or it gets into your system and causes a cytokine storm. So you kind of want to make sure that that bouncer at the gate of your lungs is really working well. And so the circulation oil, I just put over my lungs and also helps if I need to, I’m on deadline and I have to get something done. I put a little bit at the base of my skull, because that improves oxygen flow in the blood and when you have more blood and more oxygen flow, it’s easier to focus. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love that. That’s awesome. Very cool. Well, any other clinical pearls so we have the parasympathetic summit, um, in that but other great speakers 50 Plus you said we’ll put the link down below so if you guys are loving it, click down below make sure you register. We also got the link for Jodi’s website, vibrantblueoils.com those are gonna be there for you as well. March 16 2021, we’ll get the book up there pre presale Amazon like anything else. Go you know, listen to the show. Listen with?

Jodi Cohen: You know what’s funny? Like we’re about to come into Thanksgiving, holiday gratitude. And the fastest way that you can shift yourself into parasympathetic is mindset and gratitude. So if you’re worried about what’s going on in the world, just focus on what you’re grateful for. It could be something as simple as the ability to move your body and to take a breath and to have you know, it’s a gorgeous day here in Seattle to have a sunny sky, you know? Yep. So, you know, I guess I would just like to leave on that. Note that how you choose to experience the world is in your control, and you can always be grateful for things.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I like it. Yeah. When you need the world to kind of conform to the things that you want, then you tend to be like, let down yeah. When you can basically put your focus on the things that you want to appreciate, right? Yeah, in the driver’s seat. So like, that’s definitely an empowering. 

Jodi Cohen: Yes. Yes. You always get to be you always are in control of how you feel and how you think. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well, thanks so much, Jody, head over to vibrantblueoils.com, parasympathetic summit links down below. Hope you guys enjoyed today’s podcast. Have a good one. Jodi, great chatting with you.


References:

https://justinhealth.com/

https://parasympatheticsummit.com

https://vibrantblueoils.com/

https://amzn.to/3lCizd9

Audio Podcast:

Symptoms and Dangers of Low Potassium

Symptoms and Dangers of Low Potassium

Do you know how much potassium you’re getting? I was looking at some recent research including a national survey which indicated that approximately 98% of Americans are not meeting the recommended potassium intake.

We all know the Standard American Diet is not good–but it’s not just the American diet that favors processed foods over whole plant foods, such as fruits, vegetables, beans, and nuts. This is the standard European diet. This is the standard Australian diet. Most developed first-world countries are primarily consuming processed, potassium-devoid food.

Let’s tie that directly into the research I mentioned at the beginning. A study done by a Chinese hospital and Chinese medical university in Wenzhou, Zhejiang Province, China on hypokalemia and clinical implications in patients with coronavirus. The researchers found that people that had severe hypokalemia–the technical term for potassium deficiency–and took potassium supplements were inclined to recovery. While the study results don’t directy say a potassium deficiency means you’ll get sick, it does indicate that because of the ACE-2 enzyme and the whole relationship to the virus, that one contributing factor may be low potassium levels.  And if you already have low potassium to begin with, then you may have a higher risk of fatality.

Click here for a consultation with a functional medicine doctor to learn about the symptoms of potassium deficiency!

Sodium and Potassium Pump

Why Does Potassium Matter?

Potassium is a key part of the sodium-potassium pump. A cell has sodium inside the cell and potassium outside of the cell, and the sodium-potassium pump uses active transport to move molecules from a high concentration to a low concentration by moving sodium ions out of and potassium ions into the cell

The enzyme that’s involved in making this happen is an ATP enzyme. You can identify enzymes because of the suffix “-ase” at the end: ATPase. ATP is important because it is the energy generated by your mitochondria.

Side effects of a potassium deficiency include:

  • Muscle or nerve problems
  • Mood issues
  • Adrenal dysfunction
  • Energy issues
  • Digestive issues
  • Heart palpitations
  • Achy muscles, muscle breakdown
  • Feeling tired and stiff
  • Tingling and numbness issues

Symptoms and Dangers of Low Potassium

One of the big side effects of a potassium deficiency is muscle or nerve issues, because potassium and sodium are very important for the muscles and nerves to work

There is also a potential for mood issues because sodium and potassium play an intricate role with the adrenal glands. Part of the reason why people’s potassium gets low–outside of a poor diet–is going to be because of adrenal function. Typically with the adrenals, aldosterone starts to go low.  Aldosterone is a mineralocorticoid that exists in the cortex of the adrenals. As aldosterone starts going low, sodium can start to drop too. As your sodium drops, sometimes your potassium can look like it’s not too bad. It can look actually a little bit high, but you could still actually have potassium issues because of the fact that your adrenals are weak and you’re peeing out a lot of your minerals. 

If you have sodium-potassium pump issues, you probably have energy issues too. Healthy mitochondrial function is needed to make ATP for the sodium-potassium pump to work.

Cramping is another potential side effect of being potassium-deficient, because the muscles need the fluid wiring, sodium and potassium, and minerals.

Your bowel movements and your motility starts becoming slower when your potassium drops. We need healthy levels of potassium so we have good bowel movements; otherwise there can be digestive and elimination problems.

Heart palpitations are another potential effect of low potassium, since we need potassium and magnesium for our heart to pump. Our heart is a muscle as well. So if your heart is skipping beats or beating harder or faster, that’s a sign of palpitations, which could be from low potassium.

And other symptoms include tingling, numbness, achy muscles, muscle breakdown, feeling tired and stiff. The breakdown of muscle is known as rhabdomyolysis and that breakdown is going to be very much helped with good potassium levels. You’re going to have less muscle breakdown with potassium levels being adequate.

If you have any symptoms of a potassium deficiency, please reach out to a qualified professional to test your levels and determine your next steps.


The entire contents of this website are based upon the opinions of Dr. Justin Marchegiani unless otherwise noted. Individual articles are based upon the opinions of the respective author, who retains copyright as marked. The information on this website is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional and is not intended as medical advice. It is intended as a sharing of knowledge and information from the research and experience of Dr. Justin and his community. Dr. Justin encourages you to make your own health care decisions based upon your research and in partnership with a qualified healthcare professional. These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. Dr. Marchegiani’s products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. If you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition, consult your physician before using any products.