Foundational Nutrients for Optimal Health – Dr. Justin Live Podcast # 155

Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Evan Brand dive into the topic of nutrients and their importance to our bodies. Listen to this podcast and learn how B vitamins, Magnesium, Vitamin C & D, Selenium, Zinc and Omegas contribute to achieving a healthy body. Understand how these vitamins and minerals support different bodily functions and gain an understanding on how their deficiencies affect our health and cause unfavorable symptoms.

Explore other topics related to nutrients as they answer questions about leaky gut, H.pylori and some blood pressure medications which contribute to nutritional deficiency. Know some of the best sources of supplements and product recommendations which have been proven effective based on their practice and professional experience.

In this episode, we cover:

09:00   B vitamins

11:25   Minerals + Magnesium

28:15   Vitamin C, Selenium

31:18   Zinc

33:10   Omegas

36:26   Vitamin D

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Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And we’re back. It’s Dr. J here with Evan Brand, my man, how are we doing today?

Evan Brand: A happy Monday. If you’re watching in the future I guess the day doesn’t matter but for us it does.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I had a great weekend, man. I was doing a little waterskiing action today. It was phenomenal—actually yesterday, I’m sorry. Great, great day and back in the saddle for an awesome Monday. Got some patients coming up right after our live podcast. How about yourself man? Anything good happening for you?

Evan Brand: Uh—Actually, Yeah. I’m going to create a pretty cool piece of content as soon as you and I get off the call together, I’m gonna go eat some lunch and a I’m gonna drive about an hour away to a local hemp farm where there’s a guy who has a Kentucky hemp oil company that I’ve been seeing his products everywhere. His son was having a major seizure disorder. His son was having hundreds of seizures within a week. And he started to use cannabis extracts to help his son and now his son has not had seizures for years— several years. And so this guy he moved from Northern California where he was growing medical cannabis and now he’s just growing hemp in Kentucky and so I’m driving to the farm. I’ll probably end up doing a podcast with him coz I don’t think it’s gonna be easy to do it in the field, but I’m gonna  try to take my camera and puts— maybe a 45 minute little video together, try to interview him, get a little bit his story and share his products coz I’ve been using the CBD with my clients. And as you and I talk about with inflammation and the anti-anxiety benefits, you can pretty much use it with anyone. And it’s going to help regardless of the case whether it’s like Lyme or Hashimoto’s or H. pylori. Whatever we’re dealing with our clients, I mean we can pretty much use CBD across the board and we might notice some beneficial changes and it’s definitely not gonna hurt somebody. So looking forward to going to meet that guy. And stay tuned because I have a video probably the next week that’s gonna be published on it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it. Yeah. I think CBD has some really good benefits. I use on handful of patients for pain issues, for sleep issues, uh—for anxiety, just from immune balance. And I do fine. It’s— it’s very good. CBD or Cannabis Diol is the non-psychoactive component of marijuana or hamper cannabis, if you will. THC Tetrahydro Cannabis that’s gonna be the part of the marijuana that gets you high and kinda gives you the munchies. So you get some of those benefits with the CBD without the, you know, the higher the munchies afterwards. And I’ve seen it work very well with seizures like you mentioned, very well with autoimmune and pain stuff. I mean it can be very therapeutic. I don’t think it fixes the root cause but I do think it’s very, very therapeutic. It can help.

Evan Brand: Right. Well said. Yeah. Definitely not gonna fix the root cause but I’ve had some people too that are in California, other states where they can even get recreational cannabis and I tell people go for it if they asked me because if they’re doing a tincture or they’re doing a spray or sublingual, they’re not having to smoke, they’re not having to use a vaporizer if they just don’t want to get the high, there’s— there’s tons of different options where you can do a high CBD. And a very tiny amount of THC where people can help fix their sleep. I had a __ in California she’s had chronic pain. She’s had Lyme forever. She said if she does CBD by itself, does pretty much nothing; but when she adds just like a milligram, so do say, 10 to 50 mg CBD, 1 mg THC, all the sudden the synergistic effect happens and the pain goes away.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. They can be very helpful. It’s a good tool in your functional medicine uh— pockets, so to speak.

Evan Brand: Yup. Hey, Robert, thanks for joining us. James, thanks for rejoining us. Our topic, well, we figure we’ll do a Q&A but our topic initially is about foundational nutrients kind of what the things that are actually worth your time and money because Justin and I were so many people come to us after they’ve been to other functional medicine practitioners. And we’ve got a kind of clean up the mess and there’s like 20 or 30 or 40 supplements that people are taking. And we like to try to whittle that down to just some of the foundations. And some things people are taking might help and can’t hurt, but if you’re spending a thousand bucks or something crazy amount on supplements, we really want to give you the stuff that just gonna move the needle coz why take something if it’s not gonna do stuff for you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 100%. And again, kinda foundation before we go in is a Paleo template to start. And again, that’s macronutrient agnostic. It could be high-carb, low-carb, high-fat, moderate fat, high-protein, moderate protein, right? So we’re just focusing on the anti-inflammatory, nutrient dense, low toxin foods. That’s number one. And then from there, the next step above that is making sure we have the lifestyle stressors in order: sleep, hydration, uh—not eating when we’re really stressed, that’s number two. And number three is actually making sure we can digest the foods that we eat. We eat a really good diet but we can’t break it down. That’s the equivalent of going to the grocery store and leaving that food out on the counter, not putting it in the fridge for a week or two. It’s gonna rot. So the next step above that is HCL and enzymes and digestive nutrients so we can break those really good foods down. That’s our foundation. And once we have that, that’s where I think some of the nutrients come in. So with my patients, all of them, they’re on all either the Multi Nutrients Supreme or Multi support pack which has the extra, kinda stress handling nutrients that are gonna be in there which are gonna consist of high-quality B vitamins that are methylated or activated like P5P uhm—of course, like your B1, B2, right? Thiamine, riboflavin right? These are all—niacin—These are all important nutrients. Of course, activated LMTHF folate, of course, methylated B12 or some kind other adenosine hydroxy B12.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh—chelated minerals like calcium and magnesium and zinc and selenium, right? All chelated meaning they’re bound to specific amino acids, so that we can have better absorption. When we have an amino acid, kind of uhm—they’re next to it, it’s like an escort or a bodyguard for that nutrient to get where it needs to go in the body, if you will.

Evan Brand: Yup. Well said. A lot of these nutrients people are—I’m hearing feedback. What’s going on your end? Maybe your speakers are a bit loud.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I’m good on my end. I don’t hear anything here.

Evan Brand: You don’t? Okay. Leave us a comment in the YouTube if people hear the feedback at all, if you hear my voice echoing. A lot of people are so deficient in nutrients, even with an organic diet. And that is something that you and I see and measure on the stool test and then we see and measure that on the organic acids test, too. You know we’ve got a lot of people that come to us because they’ve heard us talking about like a ketogenic diet or some other high-fat diet. But then we can measure something called the steatocrit on the stool test. And so, if people wanna quantify, “Well how am I actually digesting”, “What can you guys teach me about my nutrients?” and “My diet’s perfect, I’m one of those guys, I want to try to fix everything with diet”, well, we can take a look and see if that’s actually working for you. So if we see steatocrit that’s high, that’s a fecal fat marker. You can look at your stool, of course, but it’s better to have a number. And if we see that your fecal fat marker’s high, well, we know we’ve got to give you some good fat digesting enzymes, help out the pancreas help out the gallbladder. And then also on the organic acids panel, we’re going to look at the amino acid markers, so we can see do you have the raw breakdown materials? Coz your proteins—like your animal proteins and pastured animal products—those are all made of amino acids. That’s like the breakdown products. Stuff like those and that’s what fuels your brain chemicals, your neurotransmitters and so, if we see you’re super low on amino acids, that’s a problem. So we have to fix it.

And like you mentioned, why is it happening? Well could be infections like Robert is  uh— he’s a left us a comment here. He is talking about that he’s had Blasto, he’s had Klebsiella, he’s had Citrobacter—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: He’s resolved a lot of his infections through Dr. J’s uh—antimicrobials,  which is awesome. I guarantee you are getting robbed for a long time of your—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 100%. 100% So the first thing is, right, we have that kind of diet. So think of like your health is like running a business. So every year that you’re unhealthy is like a business, right, having more expenses than its profit, right? Where then its revenue— gross revenue, right? So you’re going a little bit more into debt, a little bit more into debt. The difference is you don’t go into bankruptcy court, right, and go bankrupt. You have symptoms. And those symptoms eventually may lead into a cluster of diseases or pathology whether it’s diabetes or it’s just obesity or maybe it’s cancer or heart disease or you’re just in this in between where you kinda have chronic fatigue, you don’t feel good, you’re kind of depressed.  And then you’re in this in between where you go to the doctor and they’re just like, “Oh yeah, you’re just aging.” or “Here’s an antidepressant.” or “It’s all in your head.” And then you’re stuck with these kinda in between kind of diagnoses where you’re not— you don’t have a disease, but you sure don’t feel good and you’re not getting any answers, right?

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So that’s kinda the big thing that we see. So we’re like, alright, so imagine that that’s the equivalent of business $1 million in debt. Well just because you start having good business practice and start pulling a profit, you gotta now make above and beyond that million before you start coming back in the black. So that’s where it’s really good for some of these supplements to come in because they kinda, you know, act like a mini bailout or a mini—a mini business loan to kind of bring you back in the balance. So things like B vitamins are great because you burn these up when you’re stressed. And if you have a lot of dysbiotic bacteria, these cre— the good bacteria produce healthy amounts of B vitamins. If you have a lot of bad bacteria, you’re not getting the B vitamins and you’re also getting a lot of toxins, too, which create leaky gut and create more stress and cause you to burn B vitamins and also creates a lot of lactic acid which eats a lot of your B vitamins. So B vitamins are really important first step. And we have B vitamins like B1, which is Thiamine or B2, which is Riboflavin or B3, which is Niacin and B6, which is Pyridoxine 5 Phosphate or Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, B9, which is Folate, uhm—B 12, which is amino, B12, right? Uhm—Methylcobalamin Hydroxyl  Adenosyl Cobalamin, right? These are important B vitamins especially if you’re a vegetarian. B12 is gonna be one of those that you’re missing. So any comments, Evan, on the B vitamins and how important they are.

Evan Brand:  Yes, sir. Absolutely. And I’m gonna address Robert’s question at the same time answering uh—or adding a comment. He said “Can these infections result in high homocysteine levels?” The answer is absolutely yes and there’s a journal that I’ll send over to Justin so we can put it in the show notes. It was American family physician was the literature but it was an article all about vitamin B12 deficiency and basically what happens is whether it’s H. pylori or like they even talk about in this article which is surprising coz most conventional medical people they kinda disregard parasites, but it’s talking about the link between parasites and B12 deficiency and then the link between B12 deficiency in elevated homocysteine levels. So, yes, we may give you some type of supplement, It’s gonna have the B12 like we always talked about. We’ve gotta get to the root cause, too. So we’ve got to fix those infections like I’ve had. We gotta fix those, too, at the same time while supplementing. So let me send it to you, Justin, so we can—we can share with the listeners.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That sounds great. I think B vitamins are really important just number one because of the stress component; number two because of the gut bacteria component; and then number three just to kind of—most people are still stressed so they need those B vitamins just to help kind of breakeven every day. So that’s the first component. Uh next let’s talk about minerals. So one of the first important minerals is gonna be magnesium because it’s a mineral that has over 100 or 1000 roles 1000 and enzymatic roles in the body, right? It has a major effect on dealing with enzymes. So with Krebs cycle, with energy, with blood pressure, with mood, with, sleep, with relaxation, with stress. Lots of different roles in the body and it’s one of those that are just incredibly deficient in our food supply. There’s lots of studies on magnesium deficiency and that’s it literally prevalent over 50% of the population. So this is important and if we’re not eating organic, then the magnesium in our food will be lower. So magnesium is one of these things that we wanna make sure is in a high quality supplement. I put it in my supplement via magnesium malate. So it’s bound to malic acid which is a Krebs cycle kinda intermediary nutrient. So it’s really important for the Krebs cycle and that way we can at least guarantee a couple hundred milligrams but because it’s chelated, we you know, it—more of it gets into where it needs to go which is really important. So magnesium is another one of those very important nutrients.

Evan Brand: Good. Well said. Yeah. And if you bought magnesium at Walgreens or CVS or Walmart or Target probably magnesium oxide, we talked about this before, but it’s about a 4% absorption rate. So if you’re taking 100 mg, you’re getting 4% of that; if you’re taking a 1000 mg, 4% of that. So take a look at your supplement bottle, flipped it around and look at the form of magnesium. If it’s oxide, you could use it for constipation that’s about the only benefit. But like Justin’s talking about the to help fuel the enzymatic processes and help Krebs cycle and promote energy and all that, it’s not going to do anything. You’ve got a look at the malate’s; you’ve got a look at the taurates; you’ve got the citrate’s; the—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Glycinate.

Evan Brand: Glycinate, the threonate. So there’s many, many good ones out there. And Mercola, I don’t know if he’s just saying this like anecdotally or if he’s got some literature on it, but  Dr. Mercola’s recent talk about EMF and how he believes that the magnesium can help mitigate the EMF and he’s recommending like 2 g a day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uhm.

Evan Brand: — of different forms of magnesium. It makes sense, but I don’t know the mechanism of how that would help.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Interesting. Well if we look at the big magnesium foods, right? Magnesium is gonna be lower in foods, but it’s gonna be highest in our green vegetables— spinach, swiss chard, uh— pumpkin seeds uhm—you know, kefirs, things like that, almonds, some legumes, avocado, figs, dark chocolate—dark chocolate’s a really good one, uh— banana. Again, you just have to be careful because if you’re kind of having autoimmune issue, more on autoimmune template to start, well, seeds are out, any dairies out, legumes out, uhm— some of these—half your foods are gone.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So you have to be careful like the big things are gonna be high quality dark chocolate, uh—lots of good greens. And if you can do one of these nuts or seeds like the pumpkin seeds I mentioned, that’s a really good place. But if not, that’s were leaning on a good supplement is gonna be helpful, but the green veggie, I think will be the key uhm—to that. So we just gotta keep in in mind, you know, there may be some foods that are really good for us made nutrient profile but they may have an inflammatory profile that’s— let’s just say, kinda contradicts or kinda—the risk outweighs the benefit of getting that nutrient coz of the inflammation.

Evan Brand: Yeah. I agree. So if you’re autoimmune protocol, if your digestion’s compromised, which it probably is if you’re on an autoimmune protocol coz you probably had an autoimmune illness and that’s what we’re recommending an AIP diet. Sounds like a magnesium supplement will be much— much, much more necessary and helpful. Uh— we had a question from Linda. She said, should she be concerned if every time she goes to the stool, so every time she poops uhm— there’s an oil slick.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I don’t know if I would say– I don’t know if I would say scared but concerned, oh, right, yeah. I mean I would be scared if there was blood in the stool.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Like you know decent bit of blood and it wasn’t just from a tiny bit of a hemorrhoid issue. But if I saw blood in the stool, I would be scared, for sure. I would definitely get that—some kind of a hem—some kind of an ulcer or cancer, make sure that’s ruled out. But with just the slick in the stool, I would be concerned because you’re not digesting your fat which means vitamin A, D, E, K your fat-soluble nutrients like your long chain fatty acids like EPA or DHEA or you know, coconut, good fats like that, you’re not absorbing those which means you’re gonna have blood sugar issues and you’re gonna have malabsorption, for sure.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Absolutely. So in that case, Linda, if you listen to us before, we’ll sound like a broken record, but if not, uh— you know, if you’re working with Justin or I, what we’re gonna end up doing with you would be looking at the stool test, we’ve gotta measure that fecal fat, the steatocrit marker, we’re gonna look for infections. So we’re gonna look for parasites; we’re gonna look for yeast; we’re gonna look for fungus; we’re gonna look for anything that’s gonna be stealing your nutrients or messing up that absorption. H. pylori if that’s suppressing the parietal cells that make hydrochloric acid in the gut. Now your whole digestive cascades is falling apart, we’re gonna look at medications. So if you’ve got a history or your currently taking some type of acid blocking drug we’ve got a factor that in coz that’s such a huge factor for fat digestion, too, if you’re just suppressing that. So we gotta look for those underlying causes but eventually, yes, we could fix the situation and probably add enzymes back in. Let’s address uh—Haley’s question, too, Justin, coz uh—it kinda ties into this. She said that she’s— her digestive enzymes can make your pancreas and gallbladder quote unquote lazy. What are your thoughts? We know that’s not true. With melatonin, yes, you can turn down the production of melatonin if you supplement. But with enzymes, my understanding is we’re only feeding the fire. Justin, can you comment.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well even with melatonin I talked to Dr. Ron Rothenberg about that and he says long as the dose is relatively low that that won’t happen coz it’s a positive feedback loop with these things. But when it comes to hydrochloric acid and enzymes, one of the major feedback loops for HCl and enzymes is gastrin, right? And gastrin when you take supplemental HCl, enzyme levels are –or gastrin levels don’t drop. So it’s not like you get testosterone testicle shrink  in size.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s not like that. So my bigger concern is that someone’s not making enough enzymes because they don’t have enough hydrochloric acid in the stomach and my concern is that’s— there’s not enough HCl on the stomach because of the sympathetic stress response, right? That fight or flight from food or from emotional stress or physical stress, so we, of course, we’re fixing that stuff upstream, right? Eating in a good, stress-free environment, not hydrating with food hydrating before, you know, we’re after biting after an hour or two but after, you know, 15 minutes before. And then we’re taking enough hydrochloric acid to lower the acidity so we can activate our own enzymes. But taking something is gonna be great coz I’m more concerned about that food sitting in your gut and not being digested and basically rotting and rancidifying and putrefying, creating stress by sitting in your gut.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s my bigger concern.

Evan Brand: I agree. So we hit the minerals. You talked about those you did great. We hit our magnesium which is gonna be probably number one. There’s a whole organization dedicated to magnesium deficiencies. If you type in gotmag, it think it’s gotmag.org. There’s like stage 2, 3 and 4 symptoms. You could even have insane symptoms, big issues, heart arrhythmias, atrial fibrillation, all sorts of other like heart-related issues due to magnesium, if you’re deficient. So if you’ve got some heart flutters or some weird symptoms, the cardiologist, they’re not gonna know you’ve got a magnesium deficiency, they’re just gonna end up putting you on like a beta blocker or some type of heart rhythm drug like they’ve done to my grandmother. And they’re not addressing magnesium and these drugs they’re using are likely gonna deplete magnesium even more. So we could get into some really, really big serious health implications if we don’t address something that simple as magnesium.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, hundred percent. So again, big source of magnesium, in my line, I have one called Magnesium Supreme. That’s a magnesium malate. That malate’s are– the malic acid so that helps in the Krebs cycle, it helps with energy but also has a relaxation effect. So that’s one of the ones I formulated. I still even like a little bit of magnesium citrate at night. I think it’s great. It may not be the best absorbed, it’s cheaper but it’s still good. So I like my Magnesium Supreme and then we use the Malate— Magnesium Malate in all the multis. And the multi-nutrients Supreme, in the twice or in the Multisuper pack. So that’s kind of what we have. I like those. I use those daily. I think they’re great. And then for kids that may be uh—you know have serious gut issues, we may do like a magnesium threonate kinda gel to help or magnesium chloride kind of uhm—Epsom salt bath, too.

Evan Brand: Nice. And with the anxiety like PTSD, traumas, phobias, the supplement in my line is called Calm Clarity. And I’ve used that one with great success with people especially veterans who come back from war and they’ve just got a lot of emotional trauma or women who’ve been through some type of abuse threonate crosses the blood brain barrier. So that’s another form of magnesium and not any one form is perfect but you can use a combination of these. So like Justin mention, you wanna cycle. Maybe you’ve got some malate here, you’ve got some citrate here—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: You can add different forms.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And then we’ll put show notes and links to some of these things. So if you guys want to support the show, we always appreciate that.  We’re just trying to get you the best information possible. Now, I talked about the magnesium foods. Some of the B vitamin foods, okay? Again, you’re gonna have like if you go online and look you’re gonna see the fortified ones which are gonna be cereals and orange juices which is basically crappy, crappy B vitamins.

Evan Brand: Garbage.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: The worst quality. So do not count on any of the B vitamins from those foods. And number one, you shouldn’t be eating those foods, anyway coz they’re very high in sugar. With the orange juices and the grains are obviously gonna be the gluten thing which are gonna be inflammatory as well. So cut those out, nix those out. But you’re gonna do really with fish, with vegetables, with fruits, with meats, with leafy greens, egg yolks. So a lot of  the Paleo versions of those are gonna have super, super high amount of B vitamins which is great.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Like Pop Tarts, like fortified with 12 vitamins and minerals. It’s like, “Oh yeah,  let’s just eat pop tarts, high fructose corn syrup and genetically modified glyphosate sprayed wheat flour. We’re gonna be just fine.” Not true, not true, not true.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Remember, when you take in a lot of sugar and refined carbohydrate, all that refine carbohydrate converts to sugar and when you look at the Krebs cycle, how that Krebs cycle pumps around and it goes through all these kind of uhm—you know, reduction reactions where all these hydrogens kind of accumulate. It takes magnesium to run those cycles and if you’re basically—if it’s costing you more magnesium to run the cycle than you’re getting in, this is what we call nutrient debt, right? You’re not getting as much from it than you are— for the cost to run it, okay? So keep that in the back of your mind.

Evan Brand: Luckily the human body is resilient. I mean if that— if we we’re like a car, you and I use car analogies, if we we’re at such a nutrient debt like most people are, the car would be dead. But luckily our body will still survive. You just won’t thrive in these situations. You could have hair issues, skin issues, nail issues, like you said, autoimmune diseases, cancer, you’ve got bad skin, you’ve got acne, you’ve got poor sleep problems, you’ve got anxiety, depression, you’ve got chronic fatigue, you’ve got obesity. I mean, a lot of these diseases that have skyrocketed 10,000% over the last 20 years, there’s many, many factors that we can address in one podcast but like you mentioned, just a nutrient— the nutrient density of the soil has been reduced which is why—and I didn’t tell you this yet, but I uh—expanded my property. I bought the acre next door as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, cool.

Evan Brand: I’m gonna have a 1 acre farm and I’m gonna have as much of my food come from that as possible. Not the meats coz there’s a couple restrictions on having animals but my goal is to provide 50% is my goal. Uh— 50% of my own food. I’ve already grown stuff this year. I’ve had watermelons. Last year, I had bunch of sweet potatoes, I had strawberries, I had broccoli, carrots, all organic homegrown. There’s no more local—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great.

Evan Brand: ..that you can get than your backyard.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great. And you can even team up with some farmers and make a deal and say, “Hey, you can use my land and I’ll give you half of what’s on there.”

Evan Brand: I know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Coz then you don’t have to worry about it at all. And you kinda make this deal, they get free land but they get half the food. Hey, there’s enough food for you and your family. The rest may go bad anyway, so you may end up giving it away, anyway. So that could be a good deal for you.

Evan Brand: Yeah. I’m gonna try to do some pecan trees and I’ve got all sorts of ideas.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Cool. Yeah. Very cool, man. I think it’s important that uhm— people have to understand that your body is like a business. When a business starts having low profits and starts— the revenue starts dropping, the business has to either get incredibly efficient or typically, more than likely, lays people off, right? It fires people, right?

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And it goes off, it fires people that are least essential to driving the profit. Well, the body does the same thing. It just starts allocating resources to other areas. Some dead skin, it’s okay, we’ll have some irritation, it will get wrinkly and creepy, it’s okay, no problem. Fingernails—weaker, more brittle; hormones will be a little bit lower that means you’ll have a lot of cycles, you know, symptoms with your cycle; you’ll have lower libido; you won’t be able to recover from strenuous work out; you won’t be able to put on muscle, that’s okay, no big deal. And uh—yeah, we won’t—we won’t put it– inflammation as much so you’ll be a little bit more achy, you know, you’ll be little bit more prone to osteopenia or osteoporosis. That’s how the body thinks. Uhm– that’s how it allocates. It’s all about survival. We are really about surviving. So those nutrients help run those systems. We really want to make sure that we have enough nutrients to run systems. There a lot of people they’re focused on calories and if you’re eating a real whole foods those calories will have nutrition, but today, it’s possible with the whole pop tart analogy or the junk food analogy, you can get a whole bunch of calories and not a lot of nutrition on the flipside. So you gotta keep that in mind.

Evan Brand: Agreed. You wanna hit a couple more questions or should we try to move the conversation into some more nutrients. I’ve had vitamin C just echoing in my brain that I have to just talk about vitamin C.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Let’s hit that. I wanna hit one last thing on magnesium and we can tie it to vitamin C. There’s a lot of the medications that are out there will actually create nutrient deficiencies. And one of the biggest ones are the blood pressure medications, the water pills, the Hydrochlorothi—Hydrochlorothiazide, the Lisinopril, the ACE inhibitors, right, the beta blockers. These will actually create magnesium deficiency which magnesium is really important for regulating blood pressure, so that actually create more blood pressure, which creates more dependency on these medications. So you can see that vicious cycle. So keep in mind the nutrient deficiency aspect with these drugs. Same thing with birth control pills and B vitamins as well and magnesium. So those are couple of common medications. And then the granddaddy of them all is gonna be the acid blockers that will affect nutrients in many directions, B vitamins, minerals etc.

Evan Brand: Yup. The Omni— is it Omni with an “n” or is it “m”? Omne—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Omneprozol. O-M-N-E and then prozol.

Evan Brand: Okay.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: That’s great.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Prilosec that’s the trade name of it. That’s the—Omneprozol is the generic. So yeah, these are the medications. These are the family of meds we got to be careful of. So, kinda tagging into your vitamin C. I’ll let you the ball with that Evan.

Evan Brand: Yeah. I just wanna—one more comment on the Prilosec.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: And the thing that’s scary is these acid blockers used to be prescription and now they’re over-the-counter. So people just go to Target and they just go buy a 48 pack of these, six month supply and they throw that giant value pack 20% more pills into their shopping cart and they just go home, “Oh, yeah, Prilosec.” It’s like, “good God”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s really interesting because you know you get all the people that say, “Oh, you have to be such a super, super smart medical doctor to prescribe these drugs. They’re so dangerous. You need to have, you know, a medical Dr. kinda looking over you. And of course, that it—that is true with in a lot of cases, yeah, they contradict themselves coz then these drugs seven years later when the patent goes out, once they go generic and there’s no money behind them, they go over-the-counter.

Evan Brand: Oh my God.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Look at Ibuprofen, right? It kills 20,000 people a year and now it’s over-the-counter. It’s okay.

Evan Brand: Ugh. Insane isn’t it?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah. So I mean, you kinda talk on both sides of the mouth and you know, we pointed out. Uhm so, yeah, in general, the medications that you’re gonna see that are gonna be out there, primarily are gonna be the patented ones. Once that seven-year patents off or if they can create a mini-me version of it, then it’s over-the-counter and anyone can buy it. It’s up for grabs now.

Evan Brand: Fortunately, beta-blockers and antidepressants are still prescription only. So, that’s good. We’re saving a lot of issues with that. But yeah, let me get back on subject. Vitamin C is huge. It’s gonna be stored in the adrenal glands, typically.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: So Justin and I are gonna  measure your nutritional markers when we run organic acids testing on you. We’re gonna look at a lot of nutrients. Nine times out of 10 vitamin C shows up low because people burn through it like jet fuel, just like B vitamins that Justin mention about stress, same thing with vitamin C. There is a reference range most people aren’t even on the map. I’m seeing people at like a point level, like a decimal point level when they should be hundreds of times higher. So I’m typically gonna be using about 2000 mg and I’ve had people say, “Oh Evan, I’ve taken vitamin C for years they still show up low because they were using some garbage they got at like a health food store. Even thought it’s a health food store could still have inferior quality or it’s a consumer break— consumer grade product they bought at Whole Foods or Amazon or somewhere else. And they’re not using professional grade or they’re just using ascorbic acid only, which is decent. But to really boost up the levels, you’ve got to have the antioxidants with it. The quercetin, the rutin, the bioflavonoids.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Mixed ascorbate.

Evan Brand: Yeah. You gotta have the mixed ascorbates, too. You’ve got the magnesium ascorbate, the calcium ascorbate, the sodium ascorbates. If you just do—like  what is it? emergency that garbage that they sell at the check out line at Walgreens or other places where it’s not only is it just rate ascorbic acid it’s got fructose in there, too, which is gonna destroy blood sugar. That’s not gonna do anything. You could buy a year supply of that and not move the needle. Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hundred percent, man. So may—uh—Vitamin C is really important. I also say selenium is one of these things that are very important as well because it’s important for thyroid conversion. Uhm— it’s important for liver detoxification, it’s important precursor for glutathione, right? And we like to give that neither like a Selenium Glycinate or Selenium Methionine kinda bound to one of these sulfur amino acids.

Evan Brand: Let me ask you this.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: What do you say to all these people, “Oh, Justin, I don’t need Selenium. I eat three Brazil nuts per day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well I mean I think that’s a really good source of selenium; the problem is the amount of selenium in those brazil nuts can vary tenfold. So you could either be getting 50 µg or 500 µg. So the problem is you just don’t know how much you’re getting in each of them. So I think it’s good if you wanna do a Brazil nut or two a day.  Just make sure that the uhm—the multi you’re taking guarantees you at least 200 µg of selenium per day. And I think you’re in a really really, good place.

Evan Brand: Yeah. And we talked about the absorption issue. So if somebody has got some gut bugs, doesn’t matter if you eat the Brazil nuts. You could probably eat a whole bag and not boost up selenium, if you’re deficient and you’ve got things stealing your nutrients or compromising your digestive quality.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly. And it’s just good to have that insurance policy with selenium. Uh—it’s gonna be hard to overdose with it if you’re in that 2 to 400 µg range and you’re using a good quality like Selenium Methionine. You’re gonna be in really good shape. And again, just kinda tag teaming, we got a lot of people talking about hormone stuff. Selenium is really important for hormones especially testosterone and then we even have Zinc, right? Whether it’s zinc aspartate or zinc methionine or uhm— zinc’s really important. The zinc fingers have a lot to do with the genetics like the DNA the epigenetics. So having enough zinc is really important to activating— having good affects our epigenome. Zinc is extremely important for making HCl. It’s a really good building block for our sex hormones as well. So gotta love zinc and when you’re stressed and you have low hydrochloric acid level, zinc can go low. And you can do is a tally test. We do some Zinc Chloride or—is it Chloride or Sulfate? I was getting confused.

Evan Brand: I think Sulfate for that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yes. So Zinc Sulfate. We could do a Zinc Sulfate test. The more metallic you’re tasting it is, the better— the better your Zinc is. The better or the more neutral taste, the lower your zinc is. That’s a good little kind of rule of thumb test.

Evan Brand: So people heard that, they’re like, “What the hell is he talking about?” So basically, uh—Justin and I can send a high-quality liquid Zinc Sulfate and based on the status of your zinc, that will change the flavor of the zinc. When I took this test a few years ago, I think they say, “hold it in your mouth for up to 30 seconds” So you put a little bit zinc in your mouth, you kinda gently swish it around. I swallowed it,. I tasted nothing. That was when I had all those infections. I literally tasted nothing. It tasted like water.  My zinc was trashed and then as you improve infections, you get your digestion better, your supplementing with the right type of zinc, all the sudden you could put the zinc in your mouth and then it almost tastes like your licking a piece of metal like right away. That’s the goal but would you say, Justin? 95% of people they’re not going to taste the metal right away which means they’re super deficient.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean a lot of them are gonna be deficient if they have gut issues or stress issues or malabsorption those kind of thing for sure. So I think that’s a really important one look at. So we hit the Vitamin C, we hit Magnesium we hit Selenium and we hit Zinc.

Evan Brand: I’d say Omegas and vitamin D would be two others we have to mention.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I think Omega-3 is really important which is—the typical Omega-3 fatty acids there is ALA Alpha Linolenic Acid. That’s the omega-3 in flaxseed oil. We have EPA which is 20-chain carbon which is Eicosapentaenoic Acid, that’s EPA. And then we have the_ DHEA. These are the 20 and 22. The EPA or the DHEA are the fats found in fish oil. These are the really important ones. These have all of the anti-inflammatory action. They help block this prostaglandin E2 pathway which gets inflammation jacked up. They also are really good building blocks for the brain and the neurological system. And the ALA are the Alpha Linolenic Acid from the flax seeds and the vegetables, that actually has to get converted via this enzyme, I think it’s Delta 5 Desaturase. And that enzyme converts the 18 carbon to the 20 carbon and things like insulin resistance and inflammation and stress can affect that conversion and knock it decreased function by 80 to 90%. So you’re not getting those really biologically active omega-3 fatty acids when you’re doing a lot of the plant-based Omega-3’s because of those mechanisms I mention. So getting the really good Omega-3’s from the fish is going to the best way. Plus the fish actually bio accumulate how the plants get it which will typically is the algae, right? A lot of the good vegetable, Omega-3 supplements vegetarian ones are gonna be algae based. Well the fish concentrate the algae. It’s kinda like the grass that cows concentrate the grass. So you’re kinda getting that bioaccumulation in a more concentrated form when you’re doing some of these really good fish oils.

Evan Brand: Well said. Yeah. Pastured meats, too, you will get some— you will get some fatty acid. So your bisons, your elk, which are my two favorites.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: Your grass-fed beef, pastured pork. I would assume you’d get some from pork.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. More than likely you’re gonna get some from any of the animal products. The healthier they are, the more pastured they—the more pastured, the more biologically appropriate their diet is, uhm— the better chance that you’re gonna get more of these Omega-3 fatty acids than the more inflammatory Omega 6. But again, Arachidonic Acids are really important building block which is an Omega-6 fatty acid, but that’s gonna be a really good fat, too. So you don’t want to say, “Oh, all Omega-6 is bad. It’s just gonna really be a lot more  of the Omega-6 that are gonna be driven from vegetable oils like refined vegetable oils, right? The good vegetable oils are gonna be olive oil which is a—a Oleic Acid which is really an Omega-9, your—your uhm—short chain fatty acids are gonna come from your butters and ghee which that’s gonna be more animal-based. MCT oil or your Caproic, Caprylic uhm—Lauric acids. These C6, C8, C10, C12 fatty acids, these are gonna be in the coconut. That’s great. Uh—so those are gonna be some of the really good ones to start with. All avocado oils, another really good neutral one as well.

Evan Brand: Yeah. I just wanna point out the fact that we’re hitting a lot of really good foundational nutrients but we could do entire episodes just on magnesium, just on vitamin C.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We have that on magnesium. I know that.

Evan Brand: I think we did. Yeah. So if—if we feel like we’re glossing over some deep aspects, then that’s okay. The vitamin D that’s huge. It’s really a hormone called vitamin but vitamin D is important we like to your levels at preferably 60 or above. I say nine out of every 10 people are gonna. be deficient in magnesium As you get older, you can’t convert sunlight into usable vitamin D as much. So even if you’re getting plenty of sun exposure which I’ve talked to people who garden for six hours a day, they are still deficient in vitamin D. And so in less— you’re like Dr. Mercola, where he said he hadn’t supplemented in seven years, something like that, 5-6-7 years, he lives at a very south latitude in Florida. He’s out on the beach hours— three hours a day with so much skin exposed and he keeps his levels at about 60. So I unless you got that amount of time and lifestyle to dedicate—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Evan Brand: ..to sun, it’s gonna be really tough to keep it at adequate level.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I hundred percent agree. So Vitamin D is really important. We try to do it with actual sun exposure, uhm— don’t burn, kinda get your Minimal Erythemal Dose, MED, if you will. And uhm— supplement the rest. If you can— if you just do a really good 25 hydroxy vitamin or a regular vitamin D3, mine’s uh—Emulsi D Supreme and it’s got the uh—MCT oil and the vitamin D3—D3 in there which is a really good form. Again, you can also add some K2 in it. My biggest issue is you don’t get enough vitamin D with the K2 ones but just make sure getting some really good K2 in your foods which fermented foods are  gonna have a lot of K2 uhm—a  healthy gut bacteria makes some K2 and then also a healthy grass-fed butter or ghee are gonna be other excellent sources of vitamin K2 as well.

Evan Brand: So Designs has one that’s got 5000 IU of D+ K warning K2. I can’t remember the name.  But it’s a pretty good one and I’ve used it before think. I think—I think it’s gonna be called the Su—I think it’s Supreme.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Evan Brand: That’s what is it. D Supreme.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. The problem is the vitamin D levels in it are very, very low. That’s the only issue.

Evan Brand: I think it’s a 5000. What are you—what are you talking about using? You talking about using 8 or 10 thousand or is 5,000 good in your eyes?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It just depends. I like doing the liquid Vitamin D just because if I need to use it therapeutically like someone’s sick, right? I may do 100,000 IUs—

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And that ends up being like 20 or 30 pills. It becomes doing too hard, so it’s easier to take like 30 or 40 drops put in your smoothie and you don’t even know you had it.

Evan Brand: Well said.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I go more with the liquid, but again, your great vitamin K sources are gonna your green leafy’s, fermented foods like—like Natto, of course, Brussels sprouts, cabbage, broccoli, fermented dairy, prunes, uh—high quality uh— grass-fed butter or ghee. So you really, you know, you can get a lot of those uhm—make sure you’re getting a lot of good nutrients from those foods. Make sure their organic and that will help significantly. So if you’re doing a vitamin D, you really want to make sure that K2’s there and make sure those foods are really good in your diet and a lot of good multis and have a little bit of K2 in there, too.

Evan Brand: Good, good. Well said. Shall we look at a couple questions here?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah. Let’s hit them.

Evan Brand: Okay. So uh—we had a question about Mercola’s complete probiotic. It’s probably decent, Justin and I use professional grade. So if there’s a consumer grade product out there, we’re always gonna say ours is better because we’ve got healthcare manufacturers that make our products. There is very, very, very stringent restrictions in testing and manufacturing processes that we use and so were always going to push you towards our probiotics instead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: His is probably good, though.

Evan Brand: Yeah. I’m sure their good. I mean Mercola’s, you know, he’s very detail oriented. So I’m sure his are good but we’re biased. So we’re gonna want you to buy ours.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: So you could check out uh—justinhealth.com Check out his line. He’s got several in the gut support section and I’ve got a few formulas, too, that I’ve got on my site evanbrand.com You can check out those.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Perfect.

Evan Brand: Alright. Let’s keep going. What else as we’ve got here? Uh— Robert he asked, “What foods and supplements can you take to speed up restoring low secretory IGA?” What do you think? I think a lot of the gut supports like the leaky gut formulas, your slippery elm, your marshmallow roots, chamomile flowers, anything that’s kinda fix a leaky gut situation maybe some mushrooms to support the IGA for the immune system.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I think making sure the infections are gone, number one. Making sure the diet’s good. Making sure you’re breaking down the foods that you’re eating. Uhm— number three, once the infections gone, adding in a lot of the healing nutrients.  So in my line, we use one called, GI Restore, which is a lot of those same nutrients. Uhm—it’s got the glutamine, it’s got the slippery Elm, the aloe, the DGL, a lot of the healing, soothing nutrients. Getting the probiotics up is gonna be really helpful, you know, the Lactobacillus, the Bifidobacter strands, various strands there. Also very high amounts Saccharomyces Boulardiis is proven to help improve IgA levels. So those are really good things that you can add in there. And just making sure the adrenals are supported.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Because a healthy cortisol levels have a impact on your immune system which has an impact on your IgA. Coz your IgA is that mucosal that first-line defense for your immune system.

Evan Brand: Yes. So chronic stress, too, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: If you’re taking all the supplements in the world but you have a terrible boss and you hate your life, you’ve got to address that chronic stress component coz that’s gonna be the number one cause that’s going to drive down the secretory IgA.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hundred percent.

Evan Brand: Uh—there’s another question here. There was a supplement a person had to had a tiny bit of soy lecithin in it should they be concerned? What’s your take?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I wouldn’t worry about soy lecithin. It’s tough. Uhm—soy lecithin is more of an emulsifier. It’s more to help with the digestion and the mixing of that product is typically not gonna be soy protein in that.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: The soy protein is really what causes the problems. Lecithin’s more of an emulsifier. So as long as it’s a good quality product uhm— I’m okay with there being a little bit of soy lecithin in there.

Evan Brand: Yeah. And I’ve got a couple formulas that have it in there. I’ve had people say, “Oh my God, I’m allergic to soy.” They’re fine. They have no issue. that’s not actually— it’s such a— it’s such an extracted form that it’s not like you’re eating soy. You’re not eating soybean.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. And then in my line, I think I may just have a few that have soy lecithin in there. But we were able to make sure that it’s guaranteed that it’s non-GMO soy. So you really want to make sure it’s at least non-GMO soy lecithin. And as long as that’s there, I’m okay with it.

Evan Brand: And it’s gonna be a tiny amount. When you look at the formula we’re talking and the other ingredients, it’s not an active ingredient. So could be 1% of the formula.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And less, you know, single digits fraction of percents for sure.

Evan Brand: Yup. Good. What else we’ve got here? If you feel like hitting this and we can, we can save it for another day—symptoms of chronic intestinal infections. I think we hit on that already with the hair, the skin, the nails, the acne, depression, anxiety, fatigue.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. All your— all your common symptoms, right? Your uhm— your intestinal symptoms: bloating, gas, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, acid reflux. And then your extra intestinal which are all the mood-based and energy-based: fatigue, mood, joint pain, depression, anxiety. Those kind of things, sleep,—

Evan Brand: Autoimmunity—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hormone stuff, autoimmunity. And we got a whole podcast on that. So just google digestion or parasites or leaky gut and you’ll get a whole bunch of podcast and videos on that topic.

Evan Brand: Cool. Robert said he loved our podcast on histamine and it hit home prior to having infections no foods were problem, uh—post infection, fermented foods read havoc on him. So thanks for the podcast. Thanks for the feedback Robert. We love to hear that the histamine podcast was a killer one.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I’m looking forward to chatting with you soon, Robert. I know uhm—you’ve been doing good work on your— on yourself there with uh— some of those good informational put in the podcast. But if you need more support, let us know. I’d get retested. Make sure we get to the root cause coz if those issues are still there with the post histamine stuff, there may be some additional critters hanging around.

Evan Brand: Yep. I agree. Another question about chronic dry eyes. “How often have you seen this with your patients? I’m working on healing the gut do you think there could be other root causes to dry eyes?” Justin, what’s your take?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Chronically low cortisol. You’ll see load—you’ll see dry eyes. Typically, get your diet stable. Once your diet’s stable, you can add a lower carbohydrate kinda diet. If those dry eyes are still there, gently taper out that carbohydrate every couple of days. You know, 10- 15 g of carbs primarily at nights. Do the safe starchy versions: squash, sweet potatoes, plantains, those kind of things. And you may see those dry eyes start to go away. You can even try a tablespoon of coconut oil and a teaspoon of honey, right, before bed as well that may help.

Evan Brand: Cool. So what else we’ve got? “Can I re-infect myself with H. pylori with makeup like lipsticks that I’ve used when I had H. pylori? I’ve no idea what the lifespan of that is on the product.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It is possible. I mean I would just look at uhm—the lipstick stuff. Maybe just get a razor blade and cut that end off there. I think you’d probably be okay with that. Uhm— typically, you know, as you knock out the infection, you know, you’d still be using it. So eventually, you’d wear off that but I think if you wanna be on the safe side, I think that’s a good thing to keep in mind.  Even more important uhm—things that you can quite excise as easy like partners, right? Spouses. Ideally getting them at least treated semi- “semi” meaning maybe we only use one supplement just coz the compliance is so important. I would really be more—more imperative on the spouses and the partners.

Evan Brand: I agree. Partners are probably much bigger issue, much bigger carrier and reinfection source than your makeup and lipstick. I don’t know of any high-quality lipstick. Maybe they’re out there, but I would just throw that stuff away and maybe does discontinue using lipstick, too. I doubt you’re missing out on much in you know it’s— there’s parabens and all sorts of other stuff.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And they have some really good things on the market now that do a lot like food-based ones where they are like extracting cherries and all these different food-based ones that kinda produces the fruit-based stain and kinda gives you a similar look but it’s using nutrition and foods versus, you know, some of the synthetic things.

Evan Brand: Uhh..okay, okay. So maybe you— maybe you stick with the lipstick then. Alright. James said he had a over sympathetic—let’s see having over sympathetic with sexual activity does blood pressure med Norvasc affect ED issues? That’s kinda like—I don’t even fully understand what you’re saying coz it’s kinda like a piece together thing. Are you understanding what he’s asking?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I think what he’s saying is those medications have a potential side effect of erectile dysfunction? I would just go to RXlist.com and put that medication in there and look at that long list of side effects. I can—I can do it from right here while we continue with the conversation. What was the medication called again?

Evan Brand: It’s N-O-R-V-A-S-C. Norvasc.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay, cool. I’ll pull it up here in a second. N-O-R-V-A-S-C?

Evan Brand: N-O-R-V-A-S-C. as in Charlie.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Norvasc. Got it. Okay, cool.

Evan Brand: Then he’s saying, even with Viagra, it doesn’t correct lack of sensitivity.  So, yeah, I mean here’s my easy quick answer. If you didn’t have those symptoms before  and now you’re on this drug and those symptoms are happening, how could that not be a factor?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. This is a an—an—Am—Amlodipine, which is a basically a calcium channel blocker, okay? Which is a calcium channel blocker, which again, magnesium kind of does the same thing, FYI. And if we look at the side effects, uh—feelings like you may pass out, swelling in your hands feet and ankles, pounding heart beat or fluttering on your chest, chest pain, heavy pain spreading arms and shoulders, nausea, general ill and there’s more uhm— side effects as well. So—

Evan Brand: It’s like a commercial all of a sudden.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know, right? Let me see here: dizziness, drowsiness, tired, stomach pain—

Evan Brand: What is this—what is that? That’s for blood pressure? Is that right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. This is for blood pressure medication, but I think what you said is the best advice if that wasn’t there before and then you started taking the medication and it started happening, as long as your blood pressure is not too bad and you could taper down or you could come off with your doctor’s approval, uhm— I would have no problem doing that and seeing if those symptoms improve, then you know. Coz in the end, if it’s not a side effect on RX list.com but you take the meds out and it gets better, does it really matter that they say it is? We know clinically, right?

Evan Brand: Yep.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely.

Evan Brand: There’s so many ways. Didn’t we do a whole podcast—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Don’t—don’t come off. If your blood pressure is 160-170 and you’re on blood pressure medications, coz it will go that high afterwards, don’t come off it. You really want to make sure that if you’re on a medication and you wanted to try and see if there’s an issue, one, fix the root causes; but two, talk to the medical doctor that prescribed it and make sure they’re in concurrence—you know, in agreement with you on the taper that you’re going to do. Make sure they are on the same page.

Evan Brand: Yes. Some people they go to the other end of the spectrum where there are so anti-pharmaceutical that “I’m getting off of this.” That’s bad. You— that’s like stroke territory. So don’t do that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You just gotta be careful. Some people if you’re like 130 or 140 over like 80 or 90, not too bad. You could probably come off as long as you’re fixing other root issues, but just have a blood pressure cuff by your bed, test it in the morning, see where you’re at. Just you— you want to do it responsibly. If you do it and you want to get to the prescribing doctor on the same page as you. You don’t want to go rogue.

Evan Brand: Yup. Well said.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent. Any other questions you wanna hit up?

Evan Brand: Uh let’s see. What else we’ve got.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I have one here. We got one on Facebook here from Michelle or from

Mitchell. “Can L- tyrosine for dopamine support be too stimulating? How much should be taken to minimize side effects?” Yeah. It can be for some people. Uhm— tyrosine can kinda provide precursor supports to dopamine which then above that can go to adrenaline, so it can be. I think starting at 500 mg and working up to maybe, potentially 3 to even 6 g a day is okay. But start low and slow and if you know that it is stimulating, use it more in that first half of the day not the last half of the day.

Evan Brand: Yup. That’s a simple fix. Good answer. Uh—Nora had a follow-up here. “Thanks for answering the question. So can I successfully eradicate H. pylori and other pathogens as if I live with people who have it. Do they have to do treatment in parallel with me?” Well, if you’re sexually active with people, you’re kissing or simple enough, even just sharing straws, sharing cups, drinking after each other, that’s enough to infect them. So even if it’s not a partner, but it’s someone, “Oh, hey, let me have a drink  of that.” That’s enough to still pass H. pylori. Justin and I have seen it hundreds of times.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. The stronger your immune system is, it becomes less of an issue so like with Evan and myself, we have stronger immune systems coz we  work on that. We maybe less prone because our IgA levels are up high enough where the tiny bit of that in your system, our IgA would squash it. But if your IgA is lower and you got more the stress going on and you have poor hydrochloric acid levels, then for sure. That could happen.

Evan Brand: Yeah. And I had low IgA, too. So that’s something that you’d want it measured Nora and check with the stool testing and look for your IGA figure out which your first line of defense is looking like. If it’s low and weak, you’ve just got a lot of chronic stress, then, yeah, you’re gonna be more susceptible to—to pick it up. But to answer the question, “Could you eradicate it?” If you live with other people, yeah, you could but there’s gotta be a lot of things in your favor and you’re not sharing or sharing cups or drinking for most people or kissing them etc. Uhm— Anthony—well there’s one question about—from Anthony. He said, “It’s been over five years with gut issues, irregular stools, many doctor visits.” He found out that he had a whey and casein allergy. “Where should you start to get help?” Oh, wow! That’s a hard one to answer. Uh—right here. Justin and myself. justinhealth.com evanbrand.com I mean we’ve dealt with people who’ve already been to many doctors. I mean it’s such a common story. We always asked the question, “Hey, kinda give us your history. What—what’s been your experience with other practitioners? What have you tried to help? What have you tried that hasn’t helped?” I’d say 90% of people we talked with they’ve already been to a either a Gastro doctor or some other type of doc for their gut issues and they’ve had no success and only prescription drugs like I got recommended to myself anti-spasmodic, anti-acid drugs. If you’ve got a regular Bell’s, man, you’ve got infections. I can put money on it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And I’m a huge believer— I want every patient to at least go in the conventional medical workup before they come see functional docs or functional practitioners like ourselves just to rule out big picture pathology stuff. You know, it just makes it so we at least know that the big glaring stuff is at least been looked at and addressed and assessed. And now we’re looking more functional imbalances which is really what functional medicine is treating. It’s not medicine from a conventional disease based medicine; it’s medicine from a uh— nutritional kind of support perspective working on supporting systems, not treating symptoms and disease.

Evan Brand: Yup. We’ll take one more question here.  Uh from Charlotte O: “How do you feel about NOW foods brand supplements my health coach is using them on me. I think NOW foods is okay it’s once again, a consumer grade product, so it is going to be likely less high-quality. I have seen some fillers and some of their products. I have seen them do some inferior forms of certain nutrients; however, they’ve also got a lot of really good products, too, where they’re stepping up their game in they’re using the methylated bees and the higher qualities with the Omega’s, so.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And plus, people doesn’t know. NOW has another line. It’s a higher up line. It’s called “Protocols For Life” That’s their higher-grade line. So if you like NOW, look at Protocols For Life.

Evan Brand: Is protocol uh—will that have to be through practitioner or is that?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Couldn’t say it’s a practitioner one but it’s a little bit higher grade but it’s—it’s made by the same company. It’s their one step up.

Evan Brand: But overall what’s your take on NOW?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I mean I think they’re okay for certain things. You know, uhm— so as a kind of initial kinda get in your foot in the door kinda thing, I think it’s okay. But of course, you know, we—we have are our bias because were trying to get the highest quality in everything. And part of that is because we actually work with patients face to face. It’s not like they go online and buy something, we never see them again. We’re working with them face-to-face so we have to know that what we’re recommending is the best because we need to seek clinical outcome. So we have to know that. So it’s a little bit different for us because we gotta go all out and make sure that nothing is held back.

Evan Brand: Right. So when you’ve got these other companies and people out there promoting stuff, they’re not working with people one-on-one. So it comes directly back on Justin or directly back on me if we give him our product and it doesn’t work. That’s not very sustainable for us. So that’s why it’s much, much better enough for us. That’s why we have access for people that don’t work with us. We allow other people outside to access our uh—products because they’ve been tried and true and tested. And if they didn’t work with people, we wouldn’t carry them.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And if it doesn’t work, too, then it allows us to say, “Okay, there’s not some crappy filler or there’s some sub—sub nutrient in there. Let’s look a little bit deeper.” So it gives us the confidence that we just need to look deeper now.  So it’s gonna be on both sides.

Evan Brand: Yeah. And just a firsthand experience with NOW foods and the secondhand, I guess, through clients. I’ve had people taking like their super enzymes, for example, and I get their digestive health markers investigated on the urine and stool test, and it looks terrible. Their digestion is not working at all even with the high dose of their enzymes. So does that mean the quality is bad? Does that mean they’re not dosing it properly? Maybe they’re not consistent as much. I don’t know. Probably a combination of factors, but I always switch over people over to my professional enzymes and then I retest and then all of a sudden, it’s fixed. Is it compliance? Is it quality? Probably both.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And you know everyone has got their bias and we kinda state our bias there. You know, we’re trying to be uhm— super transparent. Uhm—but yeah, I think there 95% of companies that are out there are bad. But I think that would be in that—I would say they’re in that 5% at least are better, for sure.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Yeah.  Well, that’s it for questions. Anything else you want to hit before we wrap it up. I think we did pretty good today.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I think James uh—who is it—someone came out there—was it James—Yeah. James asked about Tom Brady. Again, love Tom Brady. Huge Patriots fan. Again Tom Brady does lots of things I would say go back and check out the podcast I did on him a year and a half ago for more specifics but he does use the green stuff. He does kinda promote like a Paleo-Alkaline diet. A lot of people have really uh—let’s just say Tom Brady like have a vegan cook. So because he had a vegan cook, Tom Brady was now on a vegan diet. No. He eats 20% meat. That’s far from vegan, okay? So just kinda keep that in the back of your mind. A lot of misnomers about Tom and he has a lot of a different training uh—modalities, too, that I’m hoping— I would love to get Tom Brady’s coach or strength coach on there.

Evan Brand: Or just get Tom Brady and the coach in a three-way podcast.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I would love that, man. I would love to hang out with Tom and get some secrets down. That’d be awesome. I think he may need to wait til he retires to truly unveil some of the stuff. But we’ll see.

Evan Brand: That’s true. That’s true. Well, reach out. I’m sure there’s a media/press person and tell him, “Look, we’ve got insanely popular health podcast. Uh— we’d like to interview Tom and his coach.” But yeah, they’d probably be like, “No way, dude. We’re not giving you the secret sauce, hold on.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know. I know. Exactly, so— I know Alex Guerrero is— is his—uh  coach that does a lot of the stuff. So I mean— really, really interested to get Alex on a uh— podcast. That’d be freaking awesome.

Evan Brand: Never hurts to ask.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No, absolutely, man.

Evan Brand: Well, let’s wrap this thing up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We had a great call today. I’m late for my next patient here, but uhm—keep dropping knowledge bombs all day, man. Really enjoyed this call with you. Anything else you want to add or say?

Evan Brand: Well I think we mentioned it all. If people wanna work with us, we work with people around the world. So Skype and phone consultations is what we do and all the lab testing except for blood you do at your house. So if you want to get help, get to the root cause, reach out justinhealth.com or Google  Dr. Justin Marchegiani or myself evanbrand.com or type in Evan Brand. Find us. Subscribe. And if you have more questions, concerns, get a hold of us. That’s what we’re here for. We love helping people. That’s what makes us thrive so we won’t help you thrive, too. So, have a great day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And leave some comments below. If you like this podcast, tell us. Tell us what you like. If you don’t like stuff, tell us what you don’t like. And tell us what you want us to talk about next time and give us a thumbs up. Give us a share. We really appreciate it, guys. And you all have an awesome day, Take care you all.

Evan Brand: Take care.  


References:

justinhealth.com

evanbrand.com

gotmag.org

https://justinhealth.com/products/magnesium-supreme/

https://justinhealth.com/products/emulsi-d-supreme/

https://justinhealth.com/products/gi-restore/

rxlist.com

https://www.nowfoods.com/

 

 

Magnesium Deficiency Causes and Solutions

Magnesium Deficiency Causes and Solutions

By: Dr. Justin Marchegiani

Magnesium is essential for proper function of over 300 enzymatic reactions and for the performance of many vital physiological functions: from heartbeat regulation to muscle contraction and relaxation. Magnesium is crucial to the body and plays a part in almost every facet of your well-being and that is why a magnesium deficiency can be responsible for almost every symptom dragging you down.

BENEFITS

BENEFITS

  • Boosts memory function
  • Muscle relaxation and sleep
  • Regulates mood and stress
  • Manages the excitability of the nervous system (calming)
  • Blood sugar control
  • Healthy bone density
  • Cardiovascular support
  • Detoxification pathways in the liver
  • Normal gut function
  • Inhibits calcium-induced cell death
  • Helps prevent osteoporosis, needed for bone formation
  • Vital for proper transcription of DNA and RNA

 A study on magnesium for insomnia in the elderly found that supplementation of magnesium improves insomnia through several measures, including sleep efficiency, sleep time, and concentration of melatonin.

DEFICIENCY CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS

DEFICIENCY CAUSES AND SYMPTOMS

Due to soil depletion and the omnipresence of processed foods, magnesium is becoming hard to find in the average American’s diet. Even within the health-conscious, high rates of prescription medications and antibiotic use lead to digestive disorders and impaired gut function, causing malabsorption of not only magnesium, but of minerals and nutrients in general, despite an otherwise clean diet.

Watching sugar and caffeine intake is important to ensure proper absorption of magnesium. Fluoride in our water supply can also negatively affect magnesium absorption.

A magnesium deficiency can cause:

  • Muscles aches and spasms
  • Poor digestion
  • Anxiety
  • Trouble sleeping and insomnia
  • Kidney and liver damage
  • Hypertension
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Alzheimer’s
  • Worsened PMS
  • Behavioral disorders
  • Mood swings
  • Osteoporosis
  • Depressed immune system
  • Cavities
  • Muscle weakness and cramps
  • Heart arrhythmias
  • Headaches
  • Nausea
  • Depression

…and pretty much everything else you don’t want. Neurosurgeon Dr. Norman Shealy says ,“Every known illness is associated with a magnesium deficiency […] A magnesium deficiency may be responsible for more diseases than any other nutrient.”

A study by the British Journal of Cancer in December 2015 looked at the incidents of pancreatic cancer by magnesium intake categories of 66,000 men and women, aged 50-76. It found that for every 100mg per day of magnesium less that was consumed, your risk for pancreatic cancer went up by 24%.

If you are concerned about a magnesium deficiency or have other health queries, book your intro consult today with Dr. Justin: https://justinhealth.com/free-consultation/

SOURCES OF MAGNESIUM

SOURCES OF MAGNESIUM

  • Leafy greens
  • Nuts and seeds
  • Fish, such as mackerel and salmon, especially eating some of the very small bones
  • Green beans
  • Avocado
  • Banana
  • High quality dark chocolate (It’s postulated that women crave dark chocolate around the start of their period because the magnesium helps with cramps and PMS symptoms)
  • Epsom salt baths are excellent as you have a large surface area (your skin) taking in the magnesium. Try 1-2 cups of Epsom salt (which is basically magnesium sulfate) in your bath for some incredibly relaxing effects.
  • An alternate mode of relaxation through magnesium would be to hop into a float tank. Taking in about a thousand pounds of Epsom salt in about 10 inches of water leaves you feeling incredible.
  • An alternate mode of relaxation through magnesium would be to hop into a float tank. Taking in about a thousand pounds of Epsom salt in about 10 inches of water leaves you feeling incredible.

DOSAGE & FORMS

  • Magnesium oxide only has about a 4% absorption rate and is comparable to table chalk. It’s cheap, easy to find, and works well as a laxative.
  • Magnesium citrate, as you find in such products as Natural Calm, is a step above magnesium oxide. It’s also rather inexpensive, works as a laxative, with a higher absorption rate.
  • Magnesium malate is very well-absorbed and acts as a calming agent rather than a laxative.
  • Magnesium glycinate is also calming without the laxative effect. It is well-absorbed as it binds to the amino acid glycine. The glycinate form tends to provide the highest levels of absorption and bioavailability, and therefore is ideal for those trying to correct a deficiency.
  • Magnesium threonate is a newer form which seems promising due to its ability to cross the blood-brain barrier and mitochondrial membrane.

 

If you are looking to get some extra magnesium into your diet, try Magnesium Supreme (https://justinhealth.com/products/magnesium-supreme/): a relaxing 50/50 blend of Magnesium malate and Magnesium glycinate.

To listen to Dr. Justin’s podcast with Evan Brand on magnesium, check out podcast #93: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9LWIGamxE2k


References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4455825/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10727669

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1855626/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23853635

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19828898

http://gotmag.org/magnesium-deficiency-101/

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2013/12/08/magnesium-health-benefits.aspx

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVZqJM5BGRU

Dr. Ben House – Enhancing testosterone and improving your health- Podcast #130

Dr. Justin Marchegiani welcomes his special guest Dr. Ben House, a functional medicine doctor based in Costa Rica who also works with a lot of athletes. Join them as they engage in a very stimulating discussion about boosting up performance athletically as they focus on the role of testosterone in the male body.

Gain valuable insight about the recent researches related to Dr. Ben’s area of expertise. Know about the different tests, markers and treatment approach that he uses to address his patients. Get to apply some valuable information related to effective movement patterns that might be related to your health and body goals.

In this episode, we cover:

2:35   Nutrition Recommendation

9:40   Overtraining and Cortisol: Testosterone Ratio

13:33   Functional Medicine Tests for Athletes

18:37   Steroid and Insulin Use

33:30   Movement Patterns

42:40   Blood Markers and Patterns in Athletes

 
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youtuve

 

 


Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hey, there! It’s Dr. Justin Marchegiani. Today we have Dr. House in the house. Dr. Ben, how are we doing today, man?

Dr. Ben House: I’m doing great. How are you?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent. We got you on Skype, too. So anyone listening to the MP3, feel free and click below and check out the YouTube channel as well. And Dr. House is over at functionalmedicinecostarica.com

Dr. Ben House: Yeah, that—that’s me. That’s where I’m at.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And you’re seeing patients virtually, as well, which is great. So if you feel like you jive at Dr. Ben, feel free head over there and reach out to him. Dr. Ben is also a PhD grad over at UT. Hook ‘em horns, baby. I’m in Austin now, too. So I’ve given up my Boston College UMass. I’m a modern now. And UT Longhorns, baby. So, congrats on that. Excited to chat.

Dr. Ben House: Yes. I miss Austin. It’s an amazing city for sure.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It is. And I know you used to work with a lot of athletes. Were you working with the UTF-8 as well? And the football players and such?

Dr. Ben House: Uh – I worked on a time, right, in basketball.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Basketball.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm – Yeah, yeah. So now he’s in the Philadelphia 76ers. So I consult with couple of proteins but uhmm—it’s—yeah, I primarily work with males and athletes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So tell me a little more about that. Like what are some of the low hanging fruits mean? Maybe we don’t have a lot of professional athletes listening here today. But what are some of the low hanging fruits are, you know, average people are listening can take and apply to themselves to make them better athletically?

Dr. Ben House: I think a lot of times we put professional athletes on the pedestal.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But most of the time, professional athletes are—uhm—they’re successful in spite of what they do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Because of what they do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. So it’s probably not best to look at what they’re doing. Uh—uh there’s obviously exemptions to every rule. There are really some teams that are really pushing the envelope as far as nutrition. But you gotta think in the pro circumstance, there’s not a ton of motivation and drive to get guys healthy if it doesn’t get them performing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm—so kinda sell there is—is Dr. Bob is really good about this—it’s you’re selling longevity.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Coz can you—after someone’s thirty, can you give him 10 years in the league, right? And that’s—that’s pretty important. And so, if we take this to the weekend warriors,  someone who’s—who just loves to train like me. I’m not a professional athlete.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I played college football, but after that, the dream was dead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm—And so it’s—it’s we really gotta—I think the low hanging fruit is the fundamentals—the things that we always talk about. Coz most athletes—they—they don’t—they overtrain because they’re under recovered.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Totally. Now on the diet side, that’s probably a foundation. I think you’ll agree with this. On the diet side, are you kinda following the paleo template? What is the food quality? What does the macros look like with an athlete like that?

Dr. Ben House: So when I lecture on or talk about nutrition, I always talk about three things. So we have quality is the first thing for me. Quality is super important. Uh—we have quality in there, we have timing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: Those are kind of—For me those are in the order of importance. Uhm—but we have to be really careful. Like Michael Phelps.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Who probably eats 68,000 calories a day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You obviously can’t eat brussel sprouts and sweet potatoes and get it done. Uhm—so when you have—when you have some who’s just training 20 hours a week, your quality has to drop. And you have to make sure your adjustment’s on point as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: Coz otherwise you gotta just stop, put the car in the garage, and really kinda figure it out. And so it’s—we’re at a really cool point where I think we have some technology coming out where we can just individualize.

Dr. Ben House: So all these—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: –hypothetical, best way shit can just go away.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. So we got the basically, high-quality proteins, high-quality fats. They’re probably—maybe these guys are gonna be higher on the macronutrients with the carbs and such, correct?

Dr. Ben House: That all depends – So carb work—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And in sport maybe.

Dr. Ben House: The carb world is really—there’s—I think of carbs as n__

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: And so if—if you want somebody to go fast, you need carbs and glycogen assistance. And so you can’t—you can’t feed high-intensity exercise on fat. It’s—it’s—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: We know that if your fat adapted, you’re actually—you’re actually metabolically inflexible so that you can’t burn carbohydrates at those—at those faster intensities. Uhmm—so for me, it’s all about what is athlete doing. What if they’re, you know, 40 year old, strength athlete and they’re 20 pounds overweight, uhmm—I’m gonna stay at the 5 rep range. Probably knock down carbs pretty well. If—are they a 20 year old athlete who’d never had any problem with weight, and I got their blood sugar, all looks fine, I’m gonna—how many carbs do you take, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. Okay. Alright, got it. So we have kinda the macronutrients, we’re obviously cutting out—organics gonna be obviously dialled in, right? Food quality’s gonna be dialled in. We’re eating enough calories—that’s big. We’re mak—making sure the in the HCl and the enzymes are up to snuff so we can actually break down and digest those foods. We’re making sure we’re drinking, we’re sleeping maybe 8-10 hours. That could be big thing as well. Uh—more exercise, more muscle breakdown requires more recovery. I think with Steve Nash and Tom Brady, too. I mean they get like 10 hours sleep a night. I think that’s the biggest thing. Huge.

Dr. Ben House: Number one. Like if you wanna increase performance, like this is out of  Stanford, like sleep more. Spend more time in bed.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. You get to bed between 10 PM and 2 AM and you’re asleep during the cycle. You’re getting access to maybe $3,000 to $5000 of growth hormone a month just by getting in bed during those timeframes. Would you agree?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And I mean, testosterone is also secreted. GNRH works in that—inside that time block, too. So it’s—the circadian rhythm hormone. So you start jacking up your circadian rhythm. And a lot of the—one of the probably because athletes we see, they’re just hooked up on cell phones all the time like this is perpetual, you know, Twitter, Facebook, social media feed. Man, that’s—that’s a whole lot of bull S.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. So you get the nutrients, you get the digestion, you get the right amount of exercising. That’s a really key thing coz a lot of times it’s train, not drain. And you see a lot of overtraining with your athletes?

Dr. Ben House: Well, I think we have to be mis—I come from a strength coach background. So in the college setting, the strength coaches it—it’s unfortunate. And you even saw it at the  University of Oregon.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: When they got rid of radicals who was like, “who’s the man?” Uhm – and I bump into this other guy and he started smoking people and he put three guys in the hospital. Uhm—so the saying with this coach is pri—it’s sometimes they’re thought of as the punishers. So they have to dole out like someone doesn’t show at the practice. And so, if you’re in a team sport atmosphere, like—you don’t have that much control over the overall, though. There’s some people that are using like Zephyr or some really cool GPS program to over—to like measure overall look.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—but some of that is outside of your control.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: The cool thing—in the general population and if you have—while like private is because you can have total control over the athlete.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And—one of my favourite examples is Rutherford who like—he was like the 200 best in the world. Uhmm—and now, when he—he was training like typical like four days a week. And they brought him to like one-two hard training sessions every 10 days, and he won the gold medal. Alright. So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Dr. Ben House: So it’s kinda—it’s like everybody is individual and so if you can individualize that protocol and—and volume’s a hammer, right? And so that’s not the thing sometimes that we wanna use all the time.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Right. That totally makes sense. So when you’re exercising these guys, are the movement patterns gonna be standard for each person like the functional ones like squats, deadlifts, lunges, step up, like core pushing and pulling movements. How do you adjust those and tweak those with the sports with the athletes?

Dr. Ben House: I—So that’s gonna be all dependent on the sport, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And the position that they play. Uhm—so if you got a baseball player, like it’s all rotary power, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: It’s probably getting them—getting them at the right side of the right handed. Getting them kinda even and obviously not getting injured. from up your eyes standpoint.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so—it, it’s so rare but I think for that, it’s also gonna depend. Like is strength, is arm strength really doesn’t apply unless like you’re a full-back or a line man. Uh—sometimes the best guys in the weight room are the worst kind in the field. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: It’s uh—we have crossfit now. I think that’s kinda—that—it’s really cool. And now the weight room is the sport.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And so weekend—it’s open right now—we can do crossfit as much as we want. But I think it just produced some people that can take insane amounts of volume. Uhm—and not everybody can. And they get—It’s very Spartan type society.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, totally. Now when you’re working out with someone, is there a certain heart rate that you want people to get back down to? Maybe with your adrenal dysfunctional patient, is there a certain heart rate you want to get back down to before they go into the next set?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—I’m kinda __heart rate isn’t our best.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: It’s an okay marker.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: I—there’s a new technology that we’re using called mock C—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Which is essentially muscle oxygenation. So we wanna see that muscle is just resaturated with oxygen (O2).

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And it’s get—it’s probably not a horrible for just the average person right now.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But it will get more affordable, uhm—it will get more usable. Right now, it’s not that user-friendly. Uhm—I think you probably want to get back to a good resting heart rate. Also the—the research is pretty clear cut if you’re chasing hypertrophy. Uhmm—that 2-3 minute window for rest is probably where you wanna be.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 2-3 minutes. Got it. And are you looking at free cortisol to uhmm—I’m sorry, free testosterone to cortisol ratio to assess overtraining in any of your athletes?

Dr. Ben House: So I look at total testosterone. I don’t put a lot—this is my personal opinion—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I’ve done a lot of research on salivary panels and I don’t like cortisol panels coz they’re just like—their—they’ve done 30 days of salivary test and they’re super variables especially in athletes. Uhh—so I don’t—If I could get a week of them, I would use them. But if I could only get one day, I don’t wanna just—I don’t wanna live and die by that one day. Uhmm—so, and I—you can ask questions. Like you know, probably the best indicator of overtraining is like hey, how you’re performing. Like how do you feel, how’s your mood like. So a lot of times, we can get a lot of information just by asking questions.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. And what’s your total cortisol cut-off? Your total testosterone cut-off be like? Is it 100 above?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I mean the research is—I don’t really get, I don’t like the whole bench press number of testosterone.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: I think it’s only looking at production. We don’t know the sensitivity and the receptor. We—we can get such binding globulin and the albumin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: We can get free testosterone but I mean the ment—the mental strain of that for guys like, “Hey you’re inadequate, you have a testosterone of 5.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I don’t like to do that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Do you see correlations, though? Do you see like, “Hey, these are the althletes that are responding the best, that are recovering the best or getting the best results” Here is where his numbers at. Do you see any correlation there?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think—we can’t really make that correlation—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: inside of physiological ranges. Uh—we don’t have a lot of data on that as far as research. Anything I would say would be anecdotal there. Uhmm—do I think, do I have a hunch that it’s better to be at 800 than 380?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Yeah. Totally.

Dr. Ben House: Do I know that 800 is better than 600 or 500? I don’t know. I haven’t seen that. I’ve seen—I’ve seen some beast that are in the 500 range like 10% body fat, like 210—like they’re front squatting 400 pounds. Like, so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Testosterone can be really variable. I think it peaks more in the AM right? And they can drop down in the afternoon. It can be the variables. So you may just catch it at the wrong window.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And in some circadian rhythms are screwed up like you have no idea where you’re measuring. So, like it’s—it’s to me—it’s the lab value is not the person so I always wanna like, “Who is this person?”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Yeah. You gotta look at the clinical outcome along with the—the objective values. Totally makes sense. Are you doing any adrenal testing with your regular functional medicine patients?

Dr. Ben House: I don’t do a lot of adrenal testing. Uh—you interviewed Wakowski here, kinda one of my favourite sayings, like 99% of new-age primates are cortisol resisting or have cortisol dysregulation so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: To me it’s like why do I want to measure chaos? I’m a big fan of not measuring chaos. Uhmm—and that—that’s just my viewpoint. So I would be apt to use like—I would use it later.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: So if you’re sleeping, if you’re doing all the things that you need to do, then I’ll run that—if we’re still not getting what we need to do. But the other way you can kinda frame it, too, is well, if I put this—I try to make it as least financially kind of—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. You’re trying to make it that the buying financially is low as possible so you can help more people, right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah. But for the testing standpoint, so—if—if someone—if I don’t—if they don’t care about money, I’m gonna get this test coz then if I show them, right? Then they’re gonna have it buying.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Exactly.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And lever is gonna be higher. Okay, your free testos—you’re free cortisol’s jacked. You have no DHEA. You start to do the shit that you need to do, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly.

Dr. Ben House: Uh but if I can get that from other means, If I can them dialled in the fundamentals, then—and doing all the things that they need to do—coz nobody in the general population’s doing that. I mean slow—today is low.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly. So looking like at the palette of test, functional medicine test that you’re using with your patient, with your athletes, what are those top tests?

Dr. Ben House: Uh, so I – my top 2 are definitely a comprehensive blood panel

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it.

Dr. Ben House: And then CSA. Like uhmm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Stool analysis.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And if someone doesn’t—if that doesn’t pop, maybe I’ll go grab a SIBO breath test or something like that if they have—if they’re carbon tolerant—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But we gotta immediately fix the digestive component. And obviously you don’t fix that without fixing the cortisol component. But uhmm—that’s my—that’s what I do. And then I’ll run precision analytics sometimes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup. Okay. So you will do one of the—the drug urine testing for the adrenal rhythm sometimes.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. Good. I do those tests as well and their good.

Dr. Ben House: I want to see uh—so a lot of functional med—I think we can get in trouble coz I’m a PhD so I’m very research oriented.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So if a test doesn’t have a ton of research behind it, I—I’m not very apt to use it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: And that can be good and bad. Uhm—but I think like 5 years down the road, like is that lab gonna run like duplicates for 30 days? Are they gonna—are they gonna just do everything in their power to validate that measurement? Or are they just gonna this is it. This works? Then that’s—that’s what I wanna see.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. That totally makes sense. And Biohouse got a new one out, called the CARS, the adaptive response. And they’re doing cortisol I think three times in the morning.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And it’s interesting because you do cortisol right away, you do it an hour later, you do it two hours later, and you see a major change in that first two hours. So I think people are really getting more stringent on when you do cortisol especially in the AM which is helpful.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Our lab at UT actually did a bunch of stuff on the cortisol awakening response. Which is—which is—that’s kind of—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You knew that’s oughta things go as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I totally agree. Now looking at growth hormone, how does growth hormone interplay? Kinda potentiates the effects on testosterone? How does growth hormone interplay? I know it’s connected to IGF-I goes to the liver. How does that affect testosterone and basically when you put on more muscle?

Dr. Ben House: So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know it’s a lot—

Dr. Ben House: Testos—testosterone’s gonna feed in IGF, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: A lot of times and we can get the liver obviously want to work—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: growth hormones gonna be secreted at night and then the liver’s clogged is not gonna make IGF. To me, we can— from an IGF perspective—I’m not super well versed in IGF because I work with a lot of young athletes. And I don’t think we’re gonna have a lot of  IGF problem, like IGF-1.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I’ve never—I used to measure IGF-1 all the time and like no one was out—like no one was—everybody was kinda in range. So I stopped running it. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And that’s just my take. Now, could they benefit from growth hormone? Probably, right? Uhm—but we also have to be careful with that because IGF-1 is a growth factor.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. It causes cancer.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And well the research on that’s kinda another thing HGH is not related to increase cancer risk but I think—I think the evidence there—is there—just a little bit caution especially if you have a lot of cancer in your fate. Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. So basically, the big things to increase testosterone: sleep, protein consumpt—ad—adequate protein, I imagine, right? The right amount of stimulus and then how about the timing of nutrition? Where does the timing come in to really potentiate testosterone and growth hormone?

Dr. Ben House: Well, I don’t know if we have a lot of research on that. Like acute—acute feeding of either fat or carbohydrate will actually lower testosterone uhm—especially in the fasted state. So to me, the bang for the buck there is probably from and under recovered mechanism. So if you just crash your glycogen stores, you probably wanna refuel. Uh—in—we know the biggest thing is gonna be total energy intake. You drop your total energy intake by 15%, you’re gonna lose D3, you’re gonna lose testosterone, so getting—if—if someone’s not—if someone’s training hard, they need the—in my mind, they have a body comp issue. And they’re training hard, they need to eat as many calories as they can to maintain their weight.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So when you see these guys in the NFL, for instance, let’s say a linebacker that needs to be big, strong, but relatively lean and fast, is it really just the quality of nutrients and getting enough of it? I mean these guys literally eating two-three thousand calories   more than what they would need just at that height and weight to keep that mass on?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. In season, like you’re gonna see—you’re gonna see insane amount of calories going and going on their mouth. Like—they—they have to. They are that active. They’re—like you have a 230-250 pound man, they need a ton of food –three to five thousand calories easy. And so uhm—that’s—you gotta be careful coz that’s hard to get. And if—and that’s why we can get into trouble like intermittent fasting with that athletes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And Paul Quinn is like very, very against intermittent fasting in athletes. And — I—I’m—I’m in the same camp. Uhm—if you—body composition is completely different, health is completely different, but I think—especially in season if you have an athlete that—you gotta get—you gotta make sure that you get him first.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. What’s your take on steroids in general? Using steroid and/or using insulin as well. What’s your take on that?

Dr. Ben House: I—yeah. Yeah. This is awesome. Uhmm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Let’s do it.

Dr. Ben House: From a TRT perspective, I think we’ve—and—a lot, just like a lot—like marijuana and I say marijuana’s bad or good. Nothing is bad or good, right? It is all context.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—I think we’ve had a veil dropped over our eyes as far as testosterone the same way.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—and everybody thinks their testosterone is very negative because of baseball, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But—the overall, the evidence for testosterone replacement therapy is overwhelmingly positive.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: Overwhelming. So—uh—now, we don’t want the same thing. We don’t wanna just slap that on every guy. We wanna make sure—we wanna use all these lifestyle strategies first, but traumatic brain injury—I – you know that’s gonna affect testicul—the—testicularitis. And so—And also, blaunt trauma to testicles. My best friend played __cross. He got hit by a 110 mile cross bow in the nuts. He had three concussions, right? So is that guy—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Aww, man!!

Dr. Ben House: Is that guy gonna be able to produce his own testosterone, right? And that’s not that abnormal like you talk—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: You talk—you talk to a lot of professional athletes like how many testosterone do you have?  I don’t know—right? Especially—especially in contact sports. Ask any of the guy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s crazy. And elbo—also the xenoestrogen exposure is gonna disrupt LH- luteinizing hormone feedback loops, too, right? So we have the—we’re bombarded with the xenoestrogens and if you’re a female, obviously just in birth control pills will scrap the females as well. But you have it in the water, you have it in the pesticides and yeah—the plastics as well.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. This is something like—male health—this is why I feel so strongly about male health is coz we have no idea what’s gonna happen, right? Babies—they—their PON1’s are not very active. And PON1 is that enzyme that kids rid of persistent organic pollutants, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Yup.

Dr. Ben House: And so we got—30—the top 37 pesticides that are used in our foods are anti-androgen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So we have no idea what’s gonna happen, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And then so the—and they only run test on one of them. They don’t run it at all of them. Uh—it’s—it’s very scary. Uhm—and this is—from my protecting you have to do everything in your power to eliminate all of those potential pollutants, right? Skin care products, everything. So we gotta get kinda weird. Uhm—and you don’t know if that’s gonna have an effect but you have to—you have to make sure. You cannot—especially babies. Like we cannot put that on—Look at the male population it’s going up today like it’s pretty scary.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, especially if you—you can’t breastfeed your child and you’re feeding them soy protein isolate. My god, the phytoestrogen content that you’re getting on that can rise up to potentially a birth-control pill in amount. Especially that’s all they’re relying on for the first six months to a year.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. It—it’s wild, man. Like it—it’s—it’s gonna be—it’s gonna be really, really interesting as you see what happens in 30 years. Like when this generation gets so like their 20’s and 30’s and 40’s, it’s gonna be—it’s gonna be wild.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. I have some people here in Austin, they’re uhm—doing some run care in melatonin and I’m researching helpful companies that’s more essential oils and more natural compounds and reusing like dying to meet—dying to make just earth to treat the fire ants or using boric acid for natural things. And peppermint oil for the Hornet’s and vinegar for different things. So we’re trying to limit our load naturally. But I see people everywhere else they’re putting a lot of chemicals out there. Are you familiar with the research on lung care products and like childhood lymphomas and leukemias and such?

Dr. Ben House: No. I haven’t—Well I haven’t looked at a lot of that research coz that’s not in my wheelhouse.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it.

Dr. Ben House: But if you look at people just eating organic vs. non-organic p—produce like if you eat organic produce, you’ll get higher sperm count—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Your sperm is clear. It’s hard—that’s the dopest study at Harvard Med.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Yeah. I totally get that one, for sure. I’ll plug the documentary, too. The disappearing male.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent PBS documentary that talks about basically these estrogenic compounds in the environment that are hurting men and our future babies. So, keep that mind, too. That’s really good.

Dr. Ben House: You can kinda educate me on this, but I think all of those are gonna be mitochondrial toxin-based, right? If you jack up the mitochondria, you’re gonna have trouble with cancer.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, absolutely. You’re gonna have issues with cancer. There’s a great book it’s called, “Tripping Over the Truth”. That’s a really good book on cancer and the connection with the mitochondria. That’s a really, really, good one. And also, just the fact that it affecting the HPT access coz you screw up LH, uhm—you screw up the pineal gland, that affects melatonin that affects puberty. All these things that antagonizes itself. And then the more fats cells you have, the more estrogen you produces, then it’s a downward cycle, the more insulin-resistant you become. And it’s just this downward cascade—this metabolic accident, so to speak.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. It’s just loops everywhere. And you gotta figure out how you’re gonna break those loops and—and that’s the thing, some guy, they have like 25 loops right in. And you just wanna give them to—that’s not gonna fix the problem. You have—That’s not—you’re not helping anyone.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And what about things like anabolic steroids? The more synthetic ones? DBOL and such?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I don’t use those. Uh—I have clients who do. Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. What’s your take on that?

Dr. Ben House: I don’t—I don’t manage any of that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: What I do is I just wanna make sure that—that’s their choice, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So I—as a—as a—as—just a male in general and as a clinician, I don’t ever wanna change someone’s goals. I just wanna help them do what they do better. And so, if you wanna be a pro body builder—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You’re gonna have to play in that realm. Now I’m not the guy to run your anabolic regimen. But I can at least see like what’s going on? Are you—are you able to get rid of it? What’s your liver doing? How’s the hematocrit? Can manage all the things that could go wrong in that situation? 24:33 Uhm—the research on that is—is—is—is I think one thing that I would like to highlight—so they’ve done studies where they give a guy 600 mg a test.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And the average builder like 1100, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And so they give these guys 600 mg a test in 12 weeks. They give 20 pounds a muscle without an exercise regimen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Whoa!

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So you’ll think about—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s insane!

Dr. Ben House: You’ll think about like instagram phenoms, like you got a lot of people out there—a lot of males that I think are chasing things that aren’t physiologically possible. Uhm—and that—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You mean—

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Go ahead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You mean like the people you’re seeing align, they’re doing those things that you mention. The 600 mg of tests and they’re just getting massive amounts of muscle that you may not be all to cheat naturally. Is that what you’re saying?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. The ethotomy is uhm—so that’s a—that’s a calculation that you can do. And anything above 25 is—it’s kind of—then you start asking questions.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Like my ethotomy is like 24, right? And I’m, you know, 1—190-185-190 and anywhere from 8-11% body fat. Maybe a little bit more if I’m off my game. Uh—and so there’s kind of a line in the sand that we can cross naturally. And obviously there’s gonna be people that are above that just from a statistical perspective.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But if someone just looks on godly jacked, I mean maybe—well—who am I to say what they’re doing and I don’t wanna be the guy that’s the ultimate whistle blower.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But I think we just gotta—we just gotta—when you look at everyone else’s highlight here, you’re gonna start questioning your own self-worth and I don’t know that you wanna do that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Totally. And what do you think about uhm—tendon growth when you’re on hormones like that? Let’s say, I know more of the artificial, but in general, do you get the compensatory growth in the tendons to support the increase in muscle mass?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So that’s one of the problems, right? It’s uh—you think about how the body responds like to__

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: The first thing that we’re gonna have is neural, right?

You can get that in minutes. And the second response is muscular. And so that’s gonna take, you know, 8 minutes, maybe last if you’re—you’ve never__

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But that—that collagen response that you know, that’s building up the fascia, building up all the tissue and the bones. That takes a longest time. So when you take shortcuts, if I put a 25 lb muscle on you, and I haven’t—I haven’t build up the structure, I’m gonna—that’s when you like—biceps tear don’t happen. Like you see a bicep tear on a deadlift, like, “Uhmm” I’m thinking, what’s going on?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. So do you uhm—

Dr. Ben House: Does that make sense?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. That totally make sense. So you—something you’re careful of and you increasing collagen supplementation to help provide extra tendons building blocks, too?

Dr. Ben House: Well, everybody had—everybody is pretty much using that I have is collagen protein.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Great. So you’re doing that.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Especially in the beginning, I take everybody off away for 30 days just coz it’s a common allergen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And if they can handle that, I want it back in. Uhm—but yeah—yeah I would say that’s kind of a non-issue for me.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So you sub out—will you sub out like the way for like a high-quality, hypoallergenic pea protein in the meantime?

Dr. Ben House: No. I’ll use—I’ll use uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Beef?

Dr. Ben House: I think if you take enough pure paleo, I think you’re gonna be fine on losing content.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it.

Dr. Ben House: That’s like a 3-gram threshold. So yeah, less than whey but if you take 30-40 grams of it, you’re gonna be fine.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice. Awesome.

Dr. Ben House: Well, I know you post a lot on Facebook. You got a home gym, you’re dad in Costa Rica now, you move from Austin down there. So you got a pretty awesome lifestyle going. Give me a quick walkthrough in the day of a life of Dr. Ben. What time do you get up? What do your meals look like? What does your work out looks like? What is post and pre work out nutrition look like? What does sleep look like?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. That—that’s fun.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Ahaha.

Dr. Ben House: So my days, I wake up—one of the cool things of why I’d wanted to move here is getting closer to the equator.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—So I go to bed like 8:30. Can’t keep my eyes open.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow!

Dr. Ben House: And then I’m up naturally like you talk about cortisol awakening response, like I can’t sleep past 5:30. So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great.

Dr. Ben House: So I wake up—I wake up and I immediately sit, right? So I sat for—I meditate for 15 minutes. Done that for years. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Great.

Dr. Ben House: Never—never will stop. That’s kinda—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Any kind of meditation? Just kinda like a blank slate in the head and you’re breathing or—

Dr. Ben House: I use mantra practice. Sometimes my dad is a—is Zen teacher.

blank slate and had new breeding or is much about is sometimes my dad as it is in Zen teacher is an ordained Zen priest.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, awesome.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So in—I started—I took my whatever you wanna—I’m kinda involved when I was about 19. Uhm—probably the best gift that I was ever given uhm—was that to be able to go to that—come to that mindful practice early.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great.

Dr. Ben House: So I’ll do—I’ll do some calming. Sometimes I do some Tibetan practice which is like—it’s one of my favourites where you wish someone well that—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And the next breath, you wish someone well that you’re kinda apathetic about.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: someone that you don’t know very well. And the last, you wish someone well that you hate.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: That you don’t really like.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And it kinda—it really helps you and by the end, you’re kinda like, “Man, I don’t have that many people that I—that I don’t like and why I don’t like them.” It becomes mostly probably, you know, you start looking to word about that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: That’s one of my favourites.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it. That’s great. So morning routine, you’re getting up 5:30, you do your meditation 15 minutes, what’s next?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so if it’s a training day, I’m probably gonna have some type of easily digestible carbohydrates and Natchan in the morning coz it’s hot here. Uhm—also, I train in I’d—I like to smash myself with prob—I’m NEAT head, there’s no way around it like I’m gonna be that guy probably even if—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: ills me. Uhm—And so I’m—I’m working that glycolytic high intensity pathway uhm—3x a week. In my youth, I do it unbelievably too much, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But—so I’ll do that and I’d work for about 3 hours in the morning depending on what I got. I usually don’t take clients until the afternoon. Uhm—And then I’ll train or if it’s a non-training day, I’m just working. Uhm—and then right now, we’re building a retreat center so I have a lot of things that I—I’m the gen—I’m essentially the general contractor there so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s awesome.

Dr. Ben House: And so half my day is in Spanish, the other half is in English. Uh—sometimes I have to run up there and do stuff but—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice.

Dr. Ben House: I spend—I spend 4 hours at least a day on Pub Med in researching and writing. That’s my—that’s my thing. I love it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And you have awesome Facebook posts, too. I appreciate it. You really condense a lot of the research down.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think that’s how we move people, right? We just consistently hit them. And you do it with a podcast.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Like this is a—even if it’s—even if it’s repetitive affirmation like if it produces an action, that’s what I’m all about.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Got it. So Pub Med 4 hours a day, that’s awesome. And then patients and then what’s next after that?

Dr. Ben House: I try to stop working.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—I think a lot of us are super passionate about our craft. I’m better about that when like something isn’t coming like I have uhm—big—big presentation’s coming up in a month. So now, I’m kinda—I’m always prepping for that. Those are kind always in my mind. So I use a lot of hard mat to kinda like turn my self-doubt.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup. Yup.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—And I try to shut it down. Shut it down in the evening, definitely by 5 or 6. And I’ll just do fun stuff with my life, right? Maybe we’ll read. Maybe I’ll read something like super unscienc-y. Maybe we’ll just watch a movie. We kinda watch— I tend to push for comedies. He tends to push for dramas but uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And I always make sure—one thing I’m really, really like big on is you have a treadmill test. It’s just baseline of movement. Like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Huge.

Dr. Ben House: We put all these—we put all these pressure on exercise and it’s just a small bucket as far as like movement. It’s like NEAT is where it’s at, Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis. And so if someone is not gaining 10,000 steps in a day, like all of the core can take can be just regulated. They’re not gonna be able to sleep. So so many good things happen if people just move.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, I agree. I mean I just got seen patients yesterday. I’ve got 25,000 steps yesterday. I mean I walk about 10 miles a day. I’m on my leg uh—my fitness power here. And I’m like—you know, there’s a leader board section and I’m always like—I always like try to be number one. So there’s yesterday right there, 21, 500. So, super. I love it.

Dr. Ben House: You’re living it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, yeah. Absolutely. And then the key thing is to I kind have my kettle bells down over here and then some push-up bars so I try to rep some of the that stuff in between patients even if I can do 2-3 minutes in like 5 or 6x a day. It just keeps the metabolism up.

Dr. Ben House: Sounds good.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I’m—I’m—I train so hard that you could I mean—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I get it. I get it.

Dr. Ben House: I’m not doing pull ups—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You’re done. You’re done after that. You’re done, man. Absolutely. So right now, we have a lot of listeners that may not be at that professional level, right? You know, frankly, they wanna be healthy, they wanna be energised, they wanna have good relationships. And then probably I can say that they probably wanna good look naked, right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah. That’s the point also.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So what are the top 5 movement patterns those people should be doing? And maybe you wanna differentiate man and woman so in case something is different there.

Dr. Ben House: Uh— So I would say first of all, like just how people are gonna come see us for a lot of like metabolic stuff and all the—everything that we do for functional med. See somebody who’s good at movement—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Like—like you’ve been at a desk your whole life and you can’t take an exhalation. Like you probably shouldn’t be deadlifting.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Like if you’re stuck in this state of extension. I don’t know that that’s—are you really gonna even activate your hamstrings? I have no idea, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Especially __Uh—so I think we wanna be able to use—we have to be able to use the big guns. We gotta—you know—hamstrings, quads, back—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: Chest, right? And so you’re gonna—you wanna squat, you wanna deadlift, you wanna benchpress, you wanna military press, but it’s always risk vs. reward. So the risk of anytime you strapping somebody, 2 hands in a bar is higher than if you put on single limb, one arm weighted, right? Or one leg weighted.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yes.

Dr. Ben House: And so for me it’s all about how do we individualized this to the person? And if you don’t individualize this, what we’ve seen is—so one of my—one of my good friends in—we used to—we have a business together in Austin, his name is Erin Davis. He’s probably—he’s like the most unknown exercise scientist. And he’s like purposely so. He’s like a hermit. And he’s a—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice.

Dr. Ben House: He’s an insane, right? And so he straps up all these gadgets to this dude. And he’s like—and – he just messes bench pessing. He’s like, “What the hell? You’re chest doesn’t even turn on.” Right? And so he can’t even—out of a barbell  bench pressing, he can’t even get the guy’s chest to turn on because of his positioning. Gives him a dumbbell, boom, he can get—he can get pec activation. So I think it’s—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, wow.

Dr. Ben House: So I think it’s really important that you see somebody who’s good at movement evaluation so you can look at your position, right? Coz muscles are slaves to position.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: So the position—who the he—what are you gonna do? Uhm—and I think there’s DNS, PRI. There’s a lot of uh—FRC. There’s a lot of things that are looking at that now.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—and there’s a lot of people that are really good at it. And so see them, pay them for their time. Uh—in Austin, there’s a guy Steve Cuddy who’s amazing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm—Erin Davis and Pad__ is obviously really good and Dave R__ has done the same as Marcus—who’s awesome as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great. So what are the top 5 movements?

Dr. Ben House: You tell me. What’s gonna activate the biggest muscle groups?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So for me, off the bat, it’s gonna be deadlift coz that’s the only one that connects upper body and lower body but actually doing with correct form really activating the lats, locking them down. Number two would be squat. I wanna get your take on front squat or back squat, though. I would do uh—pote—I’m a big fan of unilateral single leg like deadlift movements. I like those with cables. Big Paul Chek fan with that. I would say step ups and/or lunges and then after that, I mean, If I’m doing a movement, I would wanna do something that has explosion. So I would wanna do either uhmm— snatches or uhmm- cleans or sprints.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I would—I would pick like maybe one of those. Haha—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, let’s hear it.

Dr. Ben House: That’s good. That’s great.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I want—I want your take. Let me hear it.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah. Uh—So you gotta—upper body pulling is like super—you gotta have—you gotta have one of those in there.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: So whether—that’s probably a lot. Maybe a pull up if you can do it right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. So you’re talk—Alright. Got it.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—if someone’s goal is just health, probably most people’s goal is hypertrophy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So in my mind, they need to get really, really really good at the fundamentals.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: Variety may not be your bestfriend.

Dr. Ben House: You may need some of it just to keep you—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: –in the game. But you gotta be—I would probably use a trap bar. Uhm—safer for the general population. You can load it up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani : Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—it’s gonna be more quad dom. Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: I’m—So the—From the—from the deadlift perspective.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I think it’s great but if you’ve been a gymnast or if your hamstring length is really, really long, if someone can palm the floor, I’m gonna be very—I’m not gonna use—I’m not gonna throw a deadlift at somebody right there.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: I’m probably gonna use—I’m gonna use maybe couple of Bulgarian split squats, Which is probably my favourite exercise for the general population. Where you like get to activating the hamstring uhmm—from a front squat, back squat perspective, the muscle activation is fairly similar. Uhm—I would probably lean in the general population more towards the front squat because you’re gonna have more anterior core, you’re gonna have to stabilize, right? And also, like if you can’t do it, you—you drop it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Whereas the back you can like—you can—you can—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. You’re gonna overpower it, for sure.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. You might hurt yourself. Uh—so those are my view points. Again—and I use uhm—I think speed and doing things that people love is really important so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You know how to Olympic lift, and you like to snatch, you like to clean obviously. I love those things. But if you don’t like doing Olympic lift, there’s a lot of—like sprinting is a great way. But in the jumping—there’s a lot of different little things that you can do to come and get that fast twitch movement coming. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Are you doing any single leg stuff?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. You can do single-leg hops, you can do, you know, whatever. You can—I do it ton. So I don’t—I do myself in all my single leg and kinda that prep toy stuff. That’s one of my cool down. So that never leaves, right? I’m doing a lot of like prehab, rehab stuff. But my meat and potatoes is my meat and potatoes. Uhm—it’s like you can’t lose sight of that. But if someone has never train in their life, their entire workout might be prehab, rehab.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. That makes sense.

Dr. Ben House: Does that make sense?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. Now you’re reading a lot of studies. You’re spending 4 hours a day on Pub Med.  What are the key things that you look at in the studies so that you don’t get tripped up by you know—coz sometimes the conclusion might not match what the actual study has done. Just—I know we don’t have an example here, but what are the key things people should be highlighting or looking at when they’re reviewing the study?

Dr. Ben House: That’s a—that’s a problem to question. So like UT was kinda burning to us in the PhD department really, really early.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—the first thing he looks at is the chart.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So you go straight to the figures. Uh—you look at the figures and then—and then you kinda look at the stats section. You figure out— And this is from a research perspective.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Then you look at the stats section, then you look at the subjects and then you start digging the—everything that’s going on the method section. Before you look, at the conclusion and maybe—sometimes I’ll just—I’ll buzz your abstract to see what I wanna read. I’ll definitely do that. Uh—but the problem is most people, even myself, being out of the grad school for, you know, a year and half-two years. We don’t—I don’t like looking at a ton of stat research. So like Microbiome data. It’s probably the best example here. Like our lab run a ton of microbiome data.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: We got stool samples on many people, we sent that out – yeah we send it out to another lab. Uhm—and that guy get all the analysis—all the genetic analysis on the poop.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And then that guy couldn’t even analyze the data. So had to send it to a statistician to analyze the data so that we can have—we can think about it. So think about all that. Like that is—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Lots of steps.

Dr. Ben House: Now you ask the general population. You’re asking the general population to look at some kind of general linearized cluster analysis. But I don’t even know what day it is, right? And so—that uh—that—like—you know—and so they have—they tend to digestible and take away. So there’s a lot of reliance on science. If you see a study, and this is kinda something that we could talk about. You see a study that’s running like 20 paired T-test, I’m immediately like, “What the hell are you doing?” Like you can’t run—it’s—you have this 95% like a .05 alpha.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So in order for something to be statistically significant it only has to happen 5% of the time, essentially.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: And so if you run 20 tests, one of those is gonna poll just from a statistical standpoint. So that’s—you gotta be careful with that. So in that situation, I’m looking for a manova instead of an inova.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so if you see kinda like this fishing explanation which you’ll see a lot, you just see the smorgasbord of data. Uhm—be careful with that. And so—coz it can—that’s one of my favourite things to pick apart.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Anything else? So let’s summarize that. So you like the manova—you look at the—the uh T-score, right? The .05 you’re looking at that as well.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You’re looking at—

Dr. Ben House: You go ahead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You looking at the graph—you go ahead.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. You just—so we wanna make sure that something is—something can be  statistically significant but mean to us.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: So if it is— if it’s like say, you have a .1 rise in testosterone, but it’s at the .001 level, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Okay. You have a statistically significant finding but it’s clinically meaningless. So we gotta make sure that—that their findings actually mean something.

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Awesome. That’s helpful. Anything else you wanna add on that?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think that Alan Aragon, the best way to learn about research is to read other people’s critiques of research. Uhm—and Alan Aragon has his research review. And it’s a steal. It’s 10 bucks and you get 8 years of monthly research review. So if you wanna get good at reviewing research, the best place is you just read it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally makes sense. Now you mention back earlier that you are looking at a lot of blood patterns. What are the big patterns that you’re seeing pop up? Are you looking at thyroid? Are you looking at protein digestion by some of these markers? What are you seeing in blood?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So the first thing—the first thing that I’m gonna look at is haemoglobin and glucose control.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—that’s not the best measure for athlete because they’re gonna dispose of red blood cells faster than general population.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So if you see a high HbA1C in athlete, you might actually be a little bit more worried. Like maybe like 5.6, you’re like, “Uh—what’s going on with you?” uhmm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: And that all goes to context, too. Like are they gonna gain? Are they trying to gain weight? Then I’m not—they’re not probably not gonna get diabetic if they have a ton of muscle mass.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—And that’s all context dependent. And I actually like—I’m—I don’t put a lot of weight in my fasting glucose and fasting insulin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—you’re probably gonna see this, right? I don’t work with a lot of chronic patients. So that—that—C peptide and those measurement fasting can be really good for those kind of patients.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But when you—when you got a guy who’s 6’1, 8% body fat, that’s probably not gonna tell you much.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—and so I—what I really like to do is I like to use glucometer protocols.’’

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—and so I have people grab—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Come on right here.

Dr. Ben House: Just grab it 13x a day and see what happens.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And send me—send me a graph and send me when you eat and let’s have a—let’s have a discussion. Coz if you eat 3 rice cakes and you go to, you know, 200. That does not happen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You’re storing glucose in urine like we don’t want that to happen. So that’s the way we can kind of, you know, tweak carb load. The next thing uhm—obviously, you need thyroid support.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You need thyroid hormone. It runs in every cell of the human body. So I’m gonna drop—from there, I’m probably gonna drop down to thyroid and see what’s going on there. Uhm—I mean I’ve picked up so many like—Hashimoto’s in like 14-year-old kid like one of the best pictures in Texas.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Dr. Ben House: And he couldn’t recover, right? He constantly has this stupid injuries. And we grab  his lab work, his TPL is like 300.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Whoa!

Dr. Ben House: And we’re like—Yeah, and we’re like, “okay”  And he feels better, right? All these—we can’t—I can’t—his dad is like, “Oh, he needs to eat like Brady.” All that stuff—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No.

Dr. Ben House: I’m like, “No, he doesn’t.” Like—and now the kid is taking ownership of it which is amazing. He’s like—he’s like, “No, I’m not gonna eat that.” And so now, he on—he pretty much eats only autoimmune paleo. He have some rice, he does okay with rice. Uhm—and he couldn’t—he was overweighing, still crushing it like meanest curve ball uhm—this side of Mississippi. And so—but now—he’s—he’s—he looks amazing, right?

And if you play at these schools, these Texas schools, you gotta look the part. Like even if you’re—even if you’re amazing, you have to—you have to look like an animal.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely.

Dr. Ben House: That’s kind of unfortunate.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean have Hashimoto’s myself and I play baseball and sports and football growing up. And I had lots of injuries coz I was trying to eat 11 servings of grains in the food pyramid, so there’s a lot of misinformation out there. And again, a lot of people are seriously inflamed. And the more inflamed they are, the more catabolic. The more catabolic, the more they can’t recover and uh—put on muscle and heal, essentially.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. To me it’s like—it’s all about breaking cycles, right? My dad has celiac disease.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Dr. Ben House: We found out—we found out when he was like 40, like 10 inches of his colon moves—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, man.

Dr. Ben House: His gallbladder is tightening up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yikes.

Dr. Ben House: Like that’s why I got into this. I was gonna go to medical school.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And my dad got super screwed up by the conventional medical system. He was having pain killer on demand. Uh—and then I was in Colorado and I—Breaking the Viscous Cycle, I’ve read the book—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And I was like, “Hey dad, let’s just change your diet. Three A’s set him free, he was struggling like 10 years.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know. Isn’t that crazy? Dude, I know. I see it everyday. I mean—it’s—we have he most rewarding job in the world.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah, for sure.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Because you get someone banging his head against that conventional medical wall for 10 years plus, at some point, they started throwing it back on you. Saying it’s in your head, and they start making the Psychophol, right? And writing scripts for Zoloft and such. And then you’re just like, “ My god, this can’t be real.” You know—it’s gotta be real. So looking where you’re at, uhm—you mentioned uhm— blood markers. Anything else? You’ve talked about thyroid. Any specific cut off that you wanna talk about with TSH, T3 or antibody levels?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—Yes. So what I’m—I’m use uh—I use a software And so I’m always looking at total T3, total T4, free T3, free T4 and—so I’m always looking at what’s going on with that. Are they producing a ton of T4 but then they’re not converting any of it to T3?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: All the thyroid hormones are bound up. Like are they on—which is to me—like I see it constantly like if I take on a female client. I’m like, “Oh, your thyroid hormone is bind up, are you on birth control?” “Yeah.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: There it is, right? It upregulates thyroid body globulin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Uptake. Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: One of the ways that we know—we know that testosterone increases lean mass and metabolism is that it dominates your thyroid binding globulin. So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Yeah. Makes sense. You see that in PCOS, right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Exactly. So we got the thyroid. What are you looking at for protein digestion? Are you looking at globulin, creatinine, serum protein, albumin? What are you looking at?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so yeah I think total protein and globulins are soft markers for—I always think of them as like check engine lights. They’re not like end-all be-all.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: But if I see them low, “Oh my god, let’s keep some work add on that situation.” Uhm—and then kidney markers—In athletes, like this is like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Bone creatinine.

Dr. Ben House: Oh my god, this is like—I love talking about this because that—does can actually—kidney markers are essentially useless, right, in athlete. Because blood urine nitrogen is the breakdown of protein products.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: So if you’re in a Ketone, high protein diet, you’ve already—you’ve knocked that up. Now creatinine is indirect measure of muscle mass. So if I have a jacked gorilla who’s in a ton of protein, he’s automatically gonna have a GFR that’s probably pretty screwed up. But his kidney function maybe fine. Uh—so the best marker there is statin C. And so if someone is super worried about their kidney function, I’ll run that coz that’s not affected by protein intake or muscle mass.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Statin C for the kidney?

Dr. Ben House: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. Yeah. Yeah. And I’m not seeing patients that are at the same level as you know, being an athlete but I do try to keep them 48 hours away from strenuous workout so you don’t get those false positives.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I do that as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—but the re—it’s all individual. So they’ve done studies, it can be 10 days that you’ll see like liver enzyme’s high, bilirubin high. So you can—you can see those things. It all depends, some people get back in 48 hours and obviously we can’t tell people not to train for 10 days. Uhm—that’s not gonna work.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Right.

Dr. Ben House: We won’t do that. But I think 48 hours and making sure that their hydration is really, really solid.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And do you think muscle soreness would also be a pretty—pretty good subjective indicator? Making sure that they’re not incredibly sore or like in pain or you know, hurting from the workout?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think it’s probably good from an inflammatory standpoint.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You’re gonna—with CRP, you’re gonna see an acute rise with exercise and that is a positive in that overtime. Uhm—I—I hate muscle soreness like it’s— maybe—I don’t know if we have research to say that. It’s such a subjective indicator.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally.

Dr. Ben House: And it’s so variable.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. Is there anything else you wanna let the listeners know? Anything else on your health pocket that you’re kind of researching or on top of mind?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think we can kinda get lost in kind of the little things, right And so—just make—I see a lot of people that are, you know, worried about something regarding their health.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: And that—that’s probably not good. If you are incessantly worrying about your health, that—that’s a problem.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: I saw, you know, a lot of type A people that come to functional med and so one of our jobs is like, “Hey, like, you’re not gonna die.” Like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: This is okay. Like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s alright.

Dr. Ben House: You have a homocysteine of 9, you’re not gonna get killed tomorrow. There’s things that we can do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Let’s do all the things. So I’d say focus on the effort—not necessarily— always focus on effort. Uhm—and that’s my biggest thing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. And who is your ideal patient? Coz I know you made the switch from the athletic world to the functional medicine world now. You had your experience with your dad with the celiac thing. So you have some autoimmune experience. Who is your ideal patient? Someone who wanna come to see you?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. My ideal patient is a male, any—any age range, uh—but probably a male that just wants to look good, feel good, look good naked, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: That’s my prototypical client. Uhm—and then, anyone is free to email me, obviously. And like I have—I get crazy emails like, “Hey, I have a—I have a tumor in my hypothalamus. Can you help me out? And no, I can’t but uhm—let me—let me refer you out to someone who might be able to reboot your entire endocrine system.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. So functionalmedicinecostarica.com ,right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. That’s the website.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it, man. Very cool. Anything else?

Dr. Ben House: Thank you for all that you do. And just uh—just putting out there information that we all have—we all have our mediums. And you do a really good job in just finding awesome people and interviewing them. And—and letting them tell story. So thank you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. I appreciate it, Dr. Ben. I appreciate it. And the last question for you, if you’re on a dessert island, you can only choose one supplement, one herb, one nutrient, what is it?

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Haha—

Dr. Ben House: I’m gonna pick magnesium.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Magnesium. Okay. Alright.

Dr. Ben House: I’m probably get—If I will get a multi, I’m gonna—I mean—If I’m training on this island, uhm—maybe a protein supplement if I can’t find enough meat.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But uh—yeah definitely—I mean most athletes are deficient in magnesium. It’s—if you give an athlete magnesium, and they’re deficient and like, they’re gonna feel a lot better. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Awesome, my man. Well, thank you for that great feedback. Doctor House in the house. You can see him at functionalmedicinecostarica.com

Dr. Ben House, I appreciate you being on the show.

Dr. Ben House: Thank you, sir. Have a great day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You too. Take care.


References:

functionalmedicinecostarica.com

Documentary on The Disappearing Male

Tripping Over the Truth by Travis Christofferson

Breaking the Viscious Cycle by Elaine Gottschall

 

Magnesium Benefits and Magnesium Deficiency – Podcast # 128

Join Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Evan Brand as they talk about Magnesium – its importance and reasons for deficiency. Listen to them and learn the symptoms and implications of not having enough magnesium in our health.

Discover Magnesium Threonate and Magnesium Taurate as the listeners pose questions about it. Explore the different sources of magnesium that can be found in natural sources, whether food or supplement. And know about the changes that you can make in your lifestyle that will have an impact on magnesium and in turn, bring positive effects to your health.

In this episode, we cover: 

1:45   Importance of Magnesium

3:10   Magnesium Deficiency Symptoms

6:27   Magnesium Threonate

8:38   Magnesium Taurate

15:57   Top Ten Food Sources of Magnesium

 
itune

 

 

youtuve

 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And we’re live on Youtube and we are live on Facebook. Evan, my man, we’re back. Whats going on, man?

Evan Brand: How you doing? Feels like uh just– yesterday we were doing this.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Its still a live Q&A. Just a few minutes ago, I appreciate you uh – gracing us with your presence at the inn.

Evan Brand: How did that go? What did you do? You just went in there, and you just said, “Hey, I’m here to ask – uh answer questions, start asking” and that was it?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We gotta start on a little Impromptu Functional Medicine Club, you know. Instead of doing comedy and skits, we just do our functional medicine info.

Evan Brand: I agree.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It would make us look better, what do you think?

Evan Brand: I agree. Let’s do it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Cool man. Well, I’m live on Facebook here. You’re not gonna be able to hear Evan’s beautiful voice on YouTube. So I’ll see if we can a link below. You can also go to YouTube.com/justinhealth and I’ll try to put a up on here, right now so people can access that information if they are ready to go over there. So Evan, why don’t chat for a minute about uh –magnesium.

Evan Brand: Yes. This is huge and we’ve gotta give credit where credit is due. And so Morley Robbins from gotmag.org  I’m not quite sure how that worked if he founded it or what, but the magnesium advocacy group, it’s just an incredible source of information about magnesium-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely.

Evan Brand: How big of an issue is magnesium deficiency; Why is magnesium deficiency happening; why is this so much more prevalent in the modern world; how can you test for your status; and what is your protocol; how do you restore magnesium and what type of symptoms would someone listening be experiencing if you were deficient. That’s what we want to cover today – together today.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. Well magnesium over 1000 in enzymatic roles in the body, really important as a muscle relaxer; really important for blood sugar handling; uhm – really important just to – for anabolic Krebs cycle for helping to reduce the brain inflammation. So many different things. The more stressed your under, the more you’re actually gonna burned through magnesium. The more you eat sugar, right? The more refined sugar, the more –magnesium’s the cofactor for metabolising sugar; so high sugar diets and high stressed diets are one of the major ways you’re gonna deplete magnesium. Number one, you deplete it because you’re burning it out more to – to process it. Two, for stress, you’re gonna dump more of it in the kidneys into the urine. And then number three, if you’re busy eating crappy food,  you are not getting magnesium rich foods, leafy greans and such in your diet and boost up your magnesium.

Evan Brand: Yeah, let’s over a couple of statistics here. In terms of magnesium deficiency statistics, two out of every three Americans-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Evan Brand: -do not consume even the RDA from magnesium, which is 500 mg a day.  A lot of times the RDA’s are crap and we typically like people above those, but even that, people are not meeting that 500 mg. And then for those headed to the hospital, uhm – 80% of patients in an ICU setting are considered magnesium deficient.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Evan Brand: So that’s pretty interesting. There in the wait-  Morely kinda breaks down the his uh –magnesium deficiency symptom. And he’s got tons of scientific literature on this, too. He’s got your uh – mild symptoms such as like food cravings for sugar, headaches, hiccups, hyper-, hypoglycemia, irritability, loss of appetite, mood swings, muscle cramps, nausea, and nervousness, poor memory, uh – weakness and then you can go into the really, really big magnesium issues like uhm – A fib, which is what my grandmother’s got – cardiac atrial fibrillation. You’ve got congestive heart failure; you’ve got obesity; you’ve got renal failure; you’ve got stroke; you’ve got alcoholism, which makes sense; you’ve got celiac disease linked; you’ve got chronic kidney disease; concussions; depression; failure to thrive. I mean we could just list a thousand. Even PMS, I mean, we could list a thousand and bore people but I think a lot of those symptoms will probably hit home from many people listening.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, 100%. And again, magnesium is super important, especially like in today’s day and age of anxiety, right? And mood issues, one of the first things that we’re reaching for with mood, is like a benzodiazepine or like an antidepressant. And one of things that you can do to kinda like wind down and relax your nervous system and kinda relax your stress handling systems, is up to magnesium. That can make such a huge benefit.

Evan Brand: Well, remember that one night, I think it was when I was about to move back to Kentucky and I was stressed out, we had the house all packed up in Austin, I called you, I’m like, “Yo, my heart is 5000 beats a minute.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Evan Brand: This is crazy. And you go, “Oh, man, don’t worry just do a gram of magnesium.” I’m like, “Alright, I’m going for it.” I did a gram of magnesium and things slowly came back down to normal. So, you know, I’ve personally experience the benefits of magnesium. And you and I use it in some form, typically with all of our clients. Even if it’s just a uh – maintenance dose, so whether we’re trying to do a therapeutic intervention, which we can talk. Either way, we’ve typically got everyone on some sort of magnesium somewhere.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Whether it’s in our multi- support and typically the big one’s that I like, right? I like a good magnesium malate because it interplays with the Krebs cycle as well. And it’s chelated to an amino acid malate.

Evan Brand: Yeah, its pretty cheap, too, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. It’s pretty affordable. I mean that and glycinate are really good. They’re very well absorbed. Uh – and they’re also gonna help with the Krebs cycle, which – that’s gonna help the blood sugar issues; it’s gonna help with energy issues; and it’s gonna help with  stress and relaxation. That’s a good one. Magnesium citrates, commonly in like uh – a natural calm, which is really good. I typically do a little bit of mag citrate at night in a powder form and I mix it with collagen, so it’s kinda like – almost like my own little magnesium glycinate coz I’m taking it with all the glycine and collagen. And l like that for bed for hour and hour of relaxation.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Most of our audience is pretty advanced but it is worth mentioning that if you are thinking of picking up a magnesium supplement, if you go to Walmart or Target or just your typical store to get magnesium, you’re likely gonna end up getting magnesium oxide, which has a 4% absorption rate. And typically there’s gonna be tons and tons of fillers, gluten, rice, other types of stuff in there. And so we only use professional grade products in our lines and then also, you know, we will refer out to other professional lines as needed.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We got in some questions on a Mag Threonate here. A Mag Threonate, again, that’s gonna be really good especially if there’s some significant malabsorption issues. It helps with healthy brain inflammation, so taking it transdermally can help coz it can cross the blood-brain barrier. And if there’s like a lot of brain inflammation, and we’ll see that like in organic acid test. We’ll see an elevated – quinolinate or we’ll see an elevation in picolinate – picolinic acid. And that will be a big sign for increasing magnesium and if we have kids that are like autistic, or a lot of gut issues, or people can’t swallow pills, the transdermal’s great. I did flow tank, man. I did a flow tank over the weekend. So I was in 1200 pounds of magnesium salts. So after I came out of outside, it’s like shallow and super relaxed.

Evan Brand: Where did you go? Did you go to my friend zero gravity, over there at Manchaka? Or where did you go?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That zero gravity, man. How did you know?

Evan Brand: Well, coz Kevin – I know Kevin. He’s been on my podcast three times – the owner.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, I gotta have him on my podcast. That’s awesome.

Evan Brand: Yeah. He’s in – he’s in Austin. You guys can do an in-person podcast, if you wanted.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, I love it. I’m definitely excited, man. I love it. I love it.

Evan Brand: Let me connect you guys right now, then.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Let’s do it. Live in the flesh.

Evan Brand: Alright. So uh – I did wanna mention about Threonate coz I saw there was a question about it because I discussed it in my latest video, on my YouTube channel – my top 12 ways of reducing anxiety. And I love Threonate. So I have a formula called, Calm Clarity, and that’s what I use for people. And there’s a lot of cool research about Threonate specifically for people with PTSD. So I do have some veterans that I have used the Threonate with them and they say that it seriously works. And even if they’re not veterans, if they just experience trauma, it does an amazing stuff gain, the magnesium into the brain, much more than just getting it into the gut.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean that’s gets really good stuff. In my line, we have Magnesium Supreme. It’s what I used and that’s the magnesium malate. Uh – and I’m doing an lot of Krebs cycle uhm – support prgoram. I find a lot of people  with Krebs Cycle or mitochondrial issues. They do really well uh – the magnesium uhm – malate just because of the uh – Krebs cycle.

Evan Brand: Yup. That’s great.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So looking at other things here, we got – so my buddy, Steve, here on Facebook wants to talk about Magnesium Taurate for blood pressue issues. He wants to know is there mag uh – glycinate and taurate. Well, outside of just the obvious, that glycine is amino acid and taurine is an amino acid. So they’re just bound to different amino acids. I know glycinate has phenomenal absorption. In the research, it’s like 90+ percent  get absorbed. What’s your take on magnesium Taurate, Evan?

Evan Brand: I like Taurate, but I haven’t used it as much as glycinate, the malates, citrates, or the threonates. Doesn’t mean it’s not as good, I just haven’t had as much hands on experience with it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I just don’t have a ton of experience with it, Steve – but I mean, binding it to an amino acid is good if you’re getting a good clinical effect, let us know in the chat window. We’d love to hear that. But I’m definitely more biased towards a gycinate and malate but in the end, I’ll let the clinical outcome guide the ship.

Evan Brand: Agreed. That’s the best answer.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. Anything else, Evan, you wanna address? Like I gotta jump on another podcast here in a few uh – with our friend here, Kevin over at relive your bodies that will be – go on. Anything else you wanna – we wanna knock down here, in this quick little magnesium podcast.

Evan Brand: Epsom Salt Baths are great. They’re very easy. The Float tanks are gonna be better, though. And you’re gonna spend a lot of money on Epsom Salt if you’re trying to even match something that would be therapeutic. So, look up floatationlocations.com, and you can check out – type in your zipcode or if you’re out of the United States, type in your postal code and you can actually find float centers that are located near you. And typically you’re gonna spend about 60-75 bucks per hour, but it’s the best hour of your life. And when you come out, you’re gonna feel like you’ve been reborn.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Highly recommended, especially the whole sensory deprivation aspect where you open your eyes and you just don’t know if you’re asleep or awake. That’s pretty crazy. It has a big effect on relaxation. I may even go tonight, man. They’re open at 10 o’clock. I may –

Evan Brand: I know. Now, was that your first? First float?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: First float. Loved it.

Evan Brand: Are you serious?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Loved it.

Evan Brand: Oh, my god.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: First float.

Evan Brand: So I did my first float back in 2013. That was when I actually live flew into go to the Paleo f(x) for the first time and that center wasn’t open. I went to actually this little house. It was like a massage studio and they happen to have one of the small float tanks in there. And I had an out of body experience. I was basically looking at myself from a third . I’ve had some insane experience. There’s one time at Kevin’s facility, I visited Egypt during my float session. Like I was sitting on a pyramid overlooking the Nile River as it used to flow in Egypt, and then I snapped back into my body and I was, “huh” It was unbelievable. So yeah, float tanks are just unreal. We can do a whole show on it. Uh – Robert said, “What if taking magnesium causes slight nausea?” It think that – with citrate.  Do you have any say on that, Justin, in terms of nausea and magnesium? I think it possibly could depend on what you’re getting. Coz if you are doing the natural calm, and you don’t feel well with the Stevia, maybe that’s part of it and not the magnesium itself. What do you think?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Regarding that piece, if you take too much magnesium, especially like uh – a magnesium citrate or oxide, it will create bowel flow, it will help – it’s a natural laxative, right? Magnesium oxide is actually a pretty good laxative; not good for absorption, but good for moving the bowels. Same with citrate – citrate is better for absorption but  also good for moving the bowels. That could help move the bowels  a bit which is excellent. Uhm – but again, if you move the bowels too much, or if you’re kinda in between, if you don’t get enough to move the bowels, if you don’t get enough to move the bowels, you can just kinda feel like your stomach in knots a little bit, and your stool is a little loose, so you just may be in that in between magnesium tolerance dosage. What do you think?

Evan Brand: Yeah. That, I agree with you. Uh – Riley said, “Please talk more about Magnesium Threonate.” Okay, I’ll tell you a couple of things here. Uhm – there was a study in the Journal of Neurosciences 2011 that suggest an enhancement of plasticity in brain regions such as the prefrontal cortex and/or the hippocampus with the use of uh –  Magnesium L- Threonate. Also, the fear memory, without erasing the original fear memory, so this is like the trauma use. There is also another part, there is another piece of research here that shows that it can increase learning ability, working memory, short and long-term memory. And then also  – let’s see, there’s one other thing. It will mediate the effects of exposure to stress on memory. And so basically take 2 grams for maintenance but if you’ve got memory loss, or other issues then you’re gonna 3 or 4 grams of the Threonate.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I love it. It’s great.

Evan Brand: There you go.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Magnesium is excellent. It’s a natural beta-blocker as well. Uhm –part of the receptors on the beta cells of the heart, they get stimulated by calcium, right? And magnesium and calcium kinda have this natural ratio and magnesium’s gonna come in there and block the beta receptors of the heart. So it decreases that – that stimulation. So that helps to relax the heart a little bit. And if the sympathetics kinda in overdrive, it will help bring that blood pressure down naturally, too, which is really cool.

Evan Brand: Ah. I love it. Okay. So before somebody gets in some type of ,crazy hard drug, it is possible that they could get on some magnesium first.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Plus uhm the medication into the uhm – that medication and that medication, Foxglove is a natural herb for the medication that helps kinda reduce stroke, fall and reduce the heart pumping. That medication is a natural herb called Foxglove. So people, just starting low dose, Foxglove, if you’re having a lot of overly heart stimulation, like your heart is beating out of your chest, you know. First make sure you don’t have a heart attack, right? That’s number one. Rule that out by your conventional medical doctor. But uh – Foxglove and magnesium can really help kinda relax the heart a bit.

Evan Brand: You oughta chat with uh – Dr. Cawin, too. We talked about Ouabain. Ouabain it’s like uh – it’s like an ancient medicine but it’s used for heart attacks. And he said it should be basically standard care are in all uhm – ambulances. When they go to pick up someone that could potentially be having a heart attack, he says Ouabain should be on board on every ambulance in the world and it would save a lof of lives.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: What is that exactly?

Evan Brand: I believe it’s some type of – I wanna say, it’s some type of plant. The spelling of it is really weird. It’s like –

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s not Wobenzym, right? You’re saying something else?

Evan Brand: That’s correct. I’m saying Ouabain. It’s O-U-A-B-A-I-N. It’s also known as Strophanthin. And if you look it up, it was uh – traditionally use as an aero poison in Eastern Africa for hunting and warfare. But in lower doses, it can be used medically.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Ouabain.

Evan Brand: Yeah, Ouabain.Yes. So that’s a trip but, uh – it is some type of plant. It’s uh – Strophantin, that’s what it is.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Almost as good as when you say matcha.

Evan Brand: You like when I say “matcha” ?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Matcha tea. I love it. Love it. Very cool. It’s like word candy, man.

Evan Brand: Yes, it is. Well if there’s any question about magnesium, let us know. But otherwise, this is pretty straightforward. Modern life depletes magnesium, you have to replenish. I like float tanks. I like magnesium oil. Justin and I both use magnesium supplementally.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Evan Brand: We use it with our clients, too. So, also get your leafy, green vegetables, too, though. I mean that’s a good maintenance way, too.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean let’s go over the top ten foods real quick. Let’s just make sure everyone knows what’s the top 10. I mean, off the bat, just your leafy green are gonna be excellent.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Your kale, your spinach, your leafy greens are just gonna be absolutely great. I mean if you look outside of the leafy greens, what else we have for magnesium? We have nuts and seeds. Squash and pumpkin seeds are gonna be the absolute highest. Fish is gonna be right there, in number three. Uhm, beans and lentils – again, uh – just be careful with that, right? White beans and French beans and Black eyed beans and kidney beans will be the best – Chickpeas as well. Again, if you’re kinda Paleo or you’re having some issues with the legumes, and you wanna stay away from that, uh – whole-grain, brown rice, but we’re not gonna make a recommendation there because it’s – grains are creating any malabsorption or gut irritation, you’re not gonna absorb the magnesium, anyway. Plus there’s lectins and phytates in there that will bind it up. So even though it says it’s good, the question is, “Do you actually absorb it?” And I will put a – a nay on that one.

Evan Brand: Agreed.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Avocados are really excellent. Uhm – litle bit of bananas. Remember, like we’re talking about magnesium here. People think – when I say, bananas, what nutrient do you think of?

Evan Brand: Potassium

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Bananas – bananas.

Evan Brand: Potassium. Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly. But avocados have twice the amount of potassium –

Evan Brand: I know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: – than bananas do.

Evan Brand: I know. How much does it – do you have any type of numbers in front of you, like how many milligrams of magnesium or – in one avocado, for example like a husk?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So uhm – 27 milligrams in a hundred grams per banana. And then in an avocado, it’s about uh – 29. So just a little bit more.

Evan Brand: And that’s for a 100 grams avocado. I don’t know how much is a 100 grams. I mean how many grams are in one full avocado?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Typically, about 3.3 ounces is a 100 gram. So probably about 1 avocado, maybe a little more.

Evan Brand: I mean I’ve had some avocados. I feel like they’re a pound.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know.

Evan Brand: It’s gonna be –

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know. So – Just do the math, you know, figure out what 3.3 ounces is. It’s like the medium kinda husk avocado uhm – again, you’re probably okay. And again, we’re taking out the outer coating and the big uh – seed in the middle.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well, anything else we wanna hit there, so far?

Evan Brand: I don’t think so. Pumpkin seeds are great. I’m a huge fan of pumpkin seeds. Uhm, what about sunflower or kernels? Were those on the list at all?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uhm – sunflower, kernels were not but we did have the pumpkin and squash seed. So- I’ll give you the run down. Uh – sesame, brazil, almonds, cashews, pinenuts, mixed nuts, peanuts, pecans and walnuts. In that exact order. Outside of squash and pumkin being number one and two.

Evan Brand: I’m a huge fan of walnuts, too. Put a little cinnamon on those bad boys, uhm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it. Love it. Excellent. And then obviously, uhm – dark chocolate at the end, great source of magnesium. Why the women at their period time crave dark chocolate? Very high source of magnesium. And again, if you’re choosing high dark chocolate, high cacao rate, you’re gonna get more cacao, more dark chocolate without the extra sugar and berry if it’s gonna be a milk chocolate. So try to reach for higher quality. Endangered species, 88%. Cobber on the front, uh Lindt. Any other good brands you like?

Evan Brand: So the endangered species is good. I love what they’re doing to save these animals, but they’re not organic. Trader Joe’s.Trader Joe’s has an organic bar. Get this – three ingredients, it’s 2.99 for the bar, I believe it’s 72%. And it’s coco cacao butter and sugar.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s nice. That’s good. But for endangered species, they are GMO and they are certified gluten-free. So –

Evan Brand: They’re GMO free?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: They’re GMO free, at least and they’re certified gluten – So that’s. And you know, you get two good things ideally if we could have the certified organic that’d be better.They do have one but it’s like a 75%. So you could go down to the 75 and get it that and what will you get, you’d get a little bit more sugar your bucks there.

Evan Brand: So what do you got in your fridge? You got 88 in there?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 88.

Evan Brand: Nice.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 88. Absolutely, man. And I also got a couple of the KIND bars, too. There’s a 5 uh – 4 grams of sugar the uh – the uh – Madagascar Vanilla. Love those.

Evan Brand: That sounds good. Reviews help. They very, very much help. So go to uh – Beyond Wellness Radio on iTunes. That’s where Justin’s podcast is housed. Put a revie there. I mean, it takes a few minutes and you’re probably just gonna ignore me because just like when a pop up comes up on your phone and this is, “Hey, do you love this app review?” And you just click, “No, thanks” Don’t “no thanks” me. Please review Beyond Wellness on iTunes and notjustpaleo, too. And – and review it. It takes literally two minutes but when you do that, what it does is keeps us in the top 100 of health. So that way we’re beating out Jillian Michaels which is the exercise more, eat less approach. And I don’t want to be number one on the – on the rankings. We want functional medicine at the top of the charts because this is with the masses needs. So the review helps us to do that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, by the way, yeah – people Facebook, give us a review, notjustpaleo.com  and justinhealth.com Click on the podcast link, iTunes review. Also you just mentioned, biggest loser people like Jillian Michael’s. Bob Harper just had a heart attack last week.

Evan Brand: Tell people about that if they didn’t hear. Just give –

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So, Bob Harper was Jillian Michael’s side kick. They’re on the biggest loser and uhm – you know, I like the guy – his personality, pretty cool guy. But again, they’re kinda recommending this exercise more, eat less low-calorie, whole grain, low-fat kinda mind set. No emph – no emphasis on uhm – nutrient quality; no emphasis on inflammatory nutrients; no emphasis on toxins and organic foods. And again, just do more exercise, more oxidative stress, not good fats, it’s not healthy animal products. The guy gets a heart attack. I mean, maybe he’s not eating that way, but that’s the way he’s suggesting a lot of the contestants to eat. And the guy’s in his 40’s. You shouldn’t be getting a heart attack looking like as he does in his 40’s. Again, fit and healthy are two different things, though.

Evan Brand:  Yes, so let me give a couple of more notes so people understand the insanity of this. I mean as you mentioned, he’s the host of the show.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: On TV that’s getting broadcast to millions of people. Yeah, he looks okay, like if you look at his  uh – his picture, there’s a couple article where he posts like an Instagram picture of him. He looks okay externally. I mean the guy is not like overweight. But internally, it could be a whole different show. So –

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Evan Brand: He was working out at a New York City gym, and he collapsed, and he was unconscious in hospital for two days.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Crazy.

Evan Brand: So, there you go. And he’s a called, fitness expert. I’m sorry if my fitness expert who’s young has a heart attack. Unless there was some other type of genetic or you know –

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Heart Valve issue or some kind of abnormality in the heart valve at birth that you didn’t know about, I mean –

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: This guy is pushing the diet that we don’t agree with and more than likely getting excessive oxidative stress with the exercise piece to go in there. So yeah, keep that in mind. And lots of the stress, that’s the stress component that will cause you to pee out more magnesium and Steve, 5.9 for your red blood cell magnesium is perfect. I like five and above. And the medication is the Digitalis. Digitalis is the  uh – medication that is the uh – synthetic version of Foxglove that helps reduce stroke volume.

Evan Brand: And of course, we do want him – we wish the guy a speedy recovery. But man, if you say you’re a fitness expert and you’re pushing a low-fat more exercise approach, man, that’s not good. That’s not good. So we like exercise. We both do it, but  it’s the dose make the poison and the intensity makes the poison, too. And those are two levers that we adjust based on clinical symptoms and lab results.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: A 100%. Anything else here, Evan, you wanna address? I gotta jump on another podcast. We’re on a podcast cycle here today. Giving them the question you wanna hit real quick?

Evan Brand: No. That’s it, man. Lets wrap it up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Alright. Give us 5 star reviews and we’ll be back more frequently and more questions with more content and more great guests. We’re here for you guys.

Evan Brand: Take Care.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Evan, my man it’s been real – You take care.

Evan Brand: Bye.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Bye.


References:

YouTube.com/justinhealth

https://justinhealth.com/healthy-living-store/

www.notjustpaleo.com

www.floatationlocations.com

www.gotmag.org


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