Low Body Temperature! – Dr. J Live Podcast # 156

Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Evan Brand engage in a very informative discussion about low body temperature. Learn how different potential stressors like thyroid issues, adrenal issues, gut health, autoimmune conditions, nutrition and low calories cause low body temperature. Find out about the role of micronutrients in thyroid hormone conversion and be aware of the medications that have a negative impact on mitochondrial function.

Gain information about the different foods, including modifications in macronutrients, and various supplements, which will improve your health and prevent different stressors that are possibly causing low body temperature.

In this episode, we cover: low body temperature

03:27   Thyroid issues

07:05   Beneficial Nutrients

14:14   Toxins and Medications

22:51   Food and Supplements

33:46   Calorie Intake

 

 

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Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And we are live here on YouTube. It’s Dr. J in the house. Evan, my man, how are you doing brother?

Evan Brand: Hey man, happy Monday! We’re talking all fair about that shooting this morning so my mom, she worked right next door last night at the Hotel Luxor which was uh— right next door to that shooting event in Vegas. So I called her this morning and she’s safe and sound and she got released, so she’s home, hopefully sleeping. I’m sure she’s extremely adrenally stressed at this point, but hopefully she’s resting and settling down from all that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Lots of empathy for all the people out there going through that. It must be just incredibly stressful.

Evan Brand: It’s insane.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s just so difficult. So wishing everyone, you know, speedy recovery from that. That is just so difficult and man, everyone’s adrenals are revved up from that, right?

Evan Brand: I know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So let’s go into some stuff here where people, we would get— put some information out there about improving everyone’s health.

Evan Brand: Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh—and just continue to empower more people. So let’s dig in, brother.

Evan Brand: Yes. Yes, so you and I want to chat about low body temperature, which is something that so many people have. I’ve had it in the winter for a long time. I’m hoping that since I work so much, my gut and my adrenals that I don’t have it this winter but cold hands, cold feet you know that had been something that I mentioned going on with me for—for several years. I know there’s a lot of different causes that you and I wanted to go through. So how should we open this thing? Should we talk about hormones, thyroid, how do you want to lay the groundwork?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, we look at body temperature. Temperature is probably one of the best indicators of your metabolism, right? Because the more energy you have, typically the— the better your temperature is. And so typically, you’re gonna have symptoms of cold temperature which are gonna be cold hands, cold feet those kind of things. Also, fatigue, but now there’s also objective ways that we can test your temperature. You know, with the thermometer, obviously. We can do axillary temperature, which is armpit. 97.8 to 98.2 is—is Fahrenheit is a pretty good range to be in. Or 98.2 to 98.6 orally. And so you can kind of assess your temperature. You can do it in the morning and then you can also do it in the afternoon as well. Kinda do it just for before eating. That gives you a pretty good indication but if your metabolism is low and your temperature is low, it could be caused by an interplay of different things. We’ll go into it. It could be thyroid issues. It could be adrenal issues. It could be gut issues. It could be nutrient issues. It could be mitochondrial issues. So all of these things are potential stressors that could be driving that problem.

Evan Brand: I’d say number one is probably thyroid issues. Wouldn’t you suspect because so many people we talk with they have adrenal issues with them on top of that there is a thyroid problem. Like maybe elevated reverse T3, whether you’ve got that blank bullet going on or they just got a low free T3 or like you and I’ve chatted about with adrenals, you’ve got the conversion process that happens where you take the inactive T4 hormone, you convert that to active T3.That conversion process gets messed up if you’ve got chronic stress. And chronic stress as you mentioned, could be gut infections, it could be emotional stress, could be chemical, heavy metals. It could be circadian rhythm stress if you’re working third shift, for example. That could be enough to change this whole cascade. Wouldn’t you say?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, yeah. Hundred percent. I mean, again, all of those things can be intimately connected. The first we look at is thyroid because thyroid hormone has a major effect on our metabolism. And our metabolism is the sum of all chemical reactions in the body. And our metabolism is pH driven, right? So if our pH becomes too alkaline or too acidic, like you know blood pH, which exists in a very fine-tune range, right around 7.35+ or -1/10 of point there. And if that pH shifts up or down, that can affect how all of our enzymes in our bodywork. So that can affect temperature and there’s things like—uh like a diabetic coma, right? Where blood sugar can go to he— or too low typically. If someone’s type I dependent and they don’t have insulin, they don’t get sugar into their cell, which can create ketoacidosis. And that can really, really drop that pH and that put you into a coma. So our pH is very driven and has a major effect on our metabolism, so, totally.

Evan Brand: So let’s hit on—let’s hit on the thyroid peace. Now autoimmunity is something we talk about so much. Would you say a common symptom of someone with Hashimoto’s, for example, could be low body temperature or possibly even a fluctuating. Maybe their low body temperature if they’re a bit underperforming but then couldn’t they just bounce right back and get actually hot if they bump into hyperthyroid. If they’re in the Hashimoto’s state, and things are still fluctuating.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah. So, if you’re having Hashimoto’s and your immune systems constantly attacking your thyroid, your thyroid hormone can spill.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Coz every time it’s attacked, hormone spills out. Eventually those follicles run dry and you’re not gonna quite have that hyper kind of symptoms. So in an acute attack, hyper symptoms may be increased temperature are common, right? You can have like PVC’s periventricular contractions. Uh—you can have, you know, kinda this—kinda heart palpitations. Your heart’s kinda beating erratic and hard, uh—anxiety, night sweats, irritability. These are all hyper thyroid symptoms. You feel warming, right? You feel excessive warmth or temperature. But then, in a chronic state, that will eventually lead to a hypothyroid kind of environment, where your body temperature just gets very low.

Evan Brand: So someone has had Hashimoto’s for quite some time, let’s say there’s been a pretty significant tissue destruction, you would say someone will not end up being hyper long-term with Hashimoto’s. It’d probably be hypo long-term.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean you can—hyper feels very similar. Hyperthyroid Grave’s feels very similar to a hypothyroid autoimmune attack. The difference is with hyper, typically, there’s a specific antibodies or immunoglobulin compounds that come back. So with Grave’s, you’re seeing TSI immunoglobulins or you’re seeing thyroid TSH receptor site antibodies. So that’s what’s typically common in Grave’s. And when those things are high, it’s accelerating the thyroid hormone to produce excessive amounts of thyroid hormone. So there’s like a production stimulation where with the autoimmune attack, from like thyroglobulin antibodies or TPO antibodies is it’s more the spilling of a thyroid hormone out of the thyroid. It’s spilling out where the antibody attack from Grave’s, it’s stimulating the thyroid to produce more.

Evan Brand: Exactly.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: With Hashimoto’s, you’re not getting the stimulation. You’re more or less getting that spilling effect, which eventually, you know, will run dry.

Evan Brand: Got it. Got it.  Okay. So we hit the autoimmune piece. What else would go on thyroid-wise that will be an issue with temperature regulation?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Well, again, there’s also certain nutrients that have a major effect on thyroid uh—conversions. So we know things like selenium are super important for thyroid conversion. So someone may have decent thyroid levels from a T4 perspective, uh— but they may not have that activation, right? They may not have that conversion uhm— that’s so important.

Evan Brand: So could it just be the lack of trace nutrients, trace mineral selenium, zinc— things like that activators.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So here, we are live on Facebook now, too with the low body temperature podcast. So getting back onto our common thread. Yeah, micronutrients like selenium are gonna be important for thyroid conversion. It’s a five—the enzyme that converts T4 to T3 inactive thyroid hormone to active thyroid hormone is a 5 deiodinase enzyme. It’s also important with glutathione and detoxification. So, yeah, that’s totally uh— important micronutrient that will affect thyroid activations. So when we look at thyroid function, we’re looking at are there blood sugar fluctuations? Are you eating grains or foods that are gonna cause that thyroid antibody attack that could cause the hormones to spill out and eventually deplete the hormones? Your thyroid follicles carry about four months of thyroid hormone. So again, if you have a chronic Hashimoto attack, where the thyroid hormone’s spilling out faster than you can synthesize and make more, then you’re going to definitely get to that depletion state where you’re gonna go hypo from a temperature standpoint. You’re gonna go almost hypothermic. That temperature will drop below that 97.8 – 98.2 armpit temperature wise or 98.2 to 98.6 and I’ll put a handout down below to my uh— metabolic temperature handout. So people can actually track their temperatures and it’s basically a graph of three different lines. And then the top brackets where you want your temperature to be through which ranges 97.8 – 98.6 We want to be checking off daily that your temps are in this bracket not the bottom or the very bottom.

Evan Brand: Got it. Okay. So what else? Should we talk about the nutrients next?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Should we talk about the nutrients, right? Vitamin A, we talked about uh— zinc, copper, selenium, magnesium very important nutrients for thyroid conversion. Now if you’re eating a whole food diet, you’re gonna be typically pretty good. If you’re having enough HCl and enzymes, you’re gonna be good as well because we need those type of compounds to be able to ionize the minerals. So it’s the diet component. It’s making sure we have the ability to break down the foods in our diet that are nutrient dense. Uhm— number three is making sure our stress response is okay because stress hormones will affect thyroid conversion. Cortisol being hyper— very high— will affect thyroid T4 to T3 conversion that inactive to active thyroid hormone. Also, if cortisol is too lo from chronic stress. So there’s this, kinda Goldilocks effect that we see here with thyroid hormone kinda need it to be not too high, but not too low to have optimal conversion. Does that makes sense?

Evan Brand: Yeah. It does. Well said. Let me mention about the gut, too, coz you just hit on the fact that you’ve got to have absorption. So even if the diet’s good, which many people listening to us, they probably already dialed in like a Paleo template but they could still have this symptom. You may want to check for infections. Coz like Justin and I talk about almost every week at some level, there could be an H. pylori, bacteria, yeast, fungus, something going on in the gut that’s stealing your nutrients or preventing you from optimally digesting. And then that issue is compounded, if you’ve been taking any type of anti-acid where acid blocking medication something simple as Tom’s or something more strong like a prior was it Prilosec or Zantac.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So, yeah. Totally.

Evan Brand: Keep that in mind. If you’re looking at your medication list and that includes acid blockers and you have cold body temperatures, it’s probably cause you’re not digesting your foods therefore the thyroid is not getting fed the nutrients it needs.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Totally. And also a lot of medications could affect your mitochondria. Just Google antibiotics and mitochondrial function, you’ll find that antibiotics can negatively impact mitochondrial function. And you’ll also find that other medications can impact the mitochondria. And the mitochondria is like the little powerhouse of your cell where it generates a lot of ATP, which is that currency of energy in which your body runs. So that’s really important and also an important nutrient call carnitine really helps that mitochondria utilize fat for energy, generate ATP out of that good fat, you know, it’s called uh—beta oxidation where you’re generating energy from fat. And carnitine is an important nutrient primarily made from methionine and lysine. Now, I did a video call why vegan and vegetarian diets can make you fat? Now—no—don’t make you fat. But you know, why they the can—meaning it’s not a hundred percent. But if you’re insulin resistant and you’re doing it the wrong way, where you’re emphasizing maybe too much carbohydrates, not enough protein and more gut irritating foods, yeah, it can definitely predispose people that have an inflamed guts and work more on the insulin resistance side to gain weight. And one of the big things is that when you eat certain animal rich amino acids, there are some plant ones as well, you activate the cells in the brain that are called—hold on, one __my notes—uh—tenocytes. And these tenocytes are receptor sites in the brain in the third ventricle area of the brain. And there’s a direct blood flow between them and the hypothalamus. These tenocytes, one, they sense satiety but the big thing that senses satiety for them is arginine and lysine which are really high in animal-based foods. So these amino acids really get that sense of satiation so that means you’re one, gonna have appetite regulation. Coz when you actually start feeling full, you tend to not eat all the crap, right?

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So the more you can keep your cravings in check, the more you eat healthier foods because you got control over your biochemistry. You’re not reacting. You’re acting based on what you know you need to be healthy. But those amino acids are primarily gonna be higher in animal-based foods especially lysine as well.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Well said.  So in a roundabout way, if you are a vegetarian or a vegan and you’ve got low body temperature, it could just be something as simple as a carnitine deficiency. I mean you could probably get a little bit in beans maybe—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  A little bit in beans, a little bit in almonds, a little bit in plums and avocados, for sure.

Evan Brand: But even then, once we talked like—we talked all the time, digestion of those foods is probably not very good and the concentration of those is gonna be much less as opposed to a grass-fed beef.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. In my video, I talked about, you know, if you are a smart vegan where you’re not emphasizing a lot of the grains, you’re doing safer starches, you’re getting lots of fats from avocado, olive oil, coconut oil, you’re supplementing DHEA in the form of algae, right? And if you’re getting B12 uh—supplementation and you’re getting a good multi- in there and you’re getting lots of— you’re getting some protein supplementation in there, maybe from pea or hemp, right? You may be okay on a vegan-vegetarian diet, but it’s just— it’s still less than optimal just because of the fact that you gotta go through such extreme lengths to get high-quality protein sources without all the carbohydrate. Coz vegetarian-vegan diet’s typically are packed with 60 to 80% carbohydrates for that 20 to 25% of protein you get.

Evan Brand: Yup.  Well said. You hit on the mitochondria, too. We should take  that a bit further and talk about more toxins. You hit on antibiotics, some mitochondrial issues there. Makes perfect sense. We work with people all the time where they say, “Oh Justin or Evan, as soon as I took a round of antibiotics, all of a sudden things went bad.” And it could be temperature –temperature issues, it could be sleep problems, it could be gut issues, digestive problems. And so also with mitochondrial issues, we’ve got toxins. So if you’re not using 100% organic, that’s an issue because glyphosate and these other pesticides and herbicides, fungicides and insecticides— they all compound with each other. So it’s not that one chemical by itself will kill you, but if you get a little bit of glyphosate from your non-organic berries, you combine that with a little bit of conventional vegetables coz you did a salad at a restaurant, you combine that with in antibiotics that you’re getting from meat. If it’s not labeled “no antibiotics” you stock all those upon each other, you’ve got some bad mitochondrial problems here that you need to fix. And we can measure the—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. The enzymes that are needed to help move those gears that  kinda crank around that mitochondrial Krebs cycle and then flow in so the beta oxidation process. Uhm— you need certain nutrients. You need B vitamins, you need magnesium, you need zinc, the healthy levels of amino acids. You also don’t need all the toxins— the aluminum, the pesticides, the glyphosate. So those things can kinda gunk up the gears of that metabolic machinery. So it’s not only what those gears need to keep it lubricated, but what it is we don’t need to put in that will prevent those gears moving. So it’s a combination of avoiding certain things, right? And again, the medications are a double-edged sword. I’m not saying don’t use them. I’m saying just really make sure they’re— they are prescribed specifically for what you need. And it’s the last case kind of thing with antibiotics. We really want to go to herbs and botanical nutrients over antibiotics. They may have a time or place, but we want to use it only when we’ve exhausted other options.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Well said. And you and I were talking off air, we can quantify a lot of this stuff, too. So you’re talking about measuring your temperature. We can quantify what’s going on in the gut, right? We can test the gut, we can test the thyroid with—with blood using functional reference ranges and using functional numbers that conventional doctors don’t use. They’re only going to detect disease. We’re going to detect the issues before disease occurs. We’re gonna look into the gut so we could test you for infections. We could test the adrenals, look at your free cortisol rhythm so the uh— HPA axis, the hypothalamus, pituitary adrenal axis, you hear us talk about, you know, that is a factor in all of this. If your brain is not connecting the signal to the adrenals and adrenal to the thyroid, that whole system gets often chronic stress. And it’s up to us to figure out when we talk about stress what’s in that bucket. Is it just your job, your bad boss, your relationship, the divorce you’re going through? Is it that stuff only or is that stuff plus chemicals in the diet, plus nutrient deficiencies, plus infections, plus not having enough quality meat in the diet.  You see how these things can all add up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. And just to kinda look at the thyroid component again, there’s dysregulation up top where the TSH is either high extreme, higher extreme, low. Now it can be extremely low because you’re on thyroid hormone and the body needs more thyroid hormone. The body is sense— sensing more thyroid hormone in the brain, but there’s less than the actual tissues. So that you’re keeping the thyroid hormone higher, but that’s keeping the TSH low. That’s step one. The TSH may be low because of HPAT access dysregulation. That hypothalamus pituitary and that adrenal thyroid axis. There’s some kinda short-circuits happening in there because of the stress— the emotional stress, because of the physical stress, because of the chemical stressors. And we have to address those while we support the nutrients to get this hardwire back on track. We can also have low T4 levels. Coz if T4 is low, we’re gonna have low T3 over here. So we got to make sure the nutrients for T4 in there like I mentioned before the vitamin A, the zinc , the copper, magnesium, selenium, uhm— amino acids, tyrosine and potentially iodine. As long as we know that there’s not uh— autoimmune attack that’s the lease active going on. And then number three, after that, we let see how the T4 to T3 conversion is. If T4 is good, how does T3 conversion look? Is it this big drop off? Or also is there a very high amount of reverse T3 because of that stress? All those can make a big difference. And then one person ask here—James asks, “Well, is hypothyroid and hyperthyroid hypo and hyper kind of the same for treatment?” Yes and no. With hyperthyroid from a TSI thyroid stimulating immunoglobulin or TSH receptor antibody attack, we’re more concerned about coz it tends to be more chronically high which can increase the chance of a thyroid storm and then potentially a stroke. So we take that very seriously. We refer that patient out to their medical doctor uh—for monitoring. We don’t want—we wanna make sure there’s not a stroke going on. But typically, the treatment will be, you know, PTU. Uhm—basically  uh—propylthiouracil or methimazole. Things to basically block iodine uptake to make thyroid hormone. Or though— you know, typically, go to a thyroid radioactive thyroid kind of ablation or even a thyroidectomy. I’ve had patients where we’ve been able to avoid those because we give nutrients to help modulate the thyroid response and modulate the autoimmune response like carnitine, like blue flag, like lemon balm, melissa uhm—into certain adaptogens. They could also help kinda dampen that response. There are some protocols that even show higher amounts of iodine can block that sodium uhm— iodine’s import that transfers iodine into the thyroid. So there’s a couple of different protocols you can use to help. And of course, all of the diet and lifestyle things are the same. But we take the Grave’s autoimmune attack a little bit more seriously just because of the repercussions of it not being treated appropriately, what will happen, we really want to sidestep those.

Evan Brand: Yup. Well said. So get the TPO antibodies checked. Get your eTG antibodies checked, you talk about the TSI. Now, have you seen where TPO TG would be high at the same time as TSI? Where it’s gonna look like Hashimoto’s and Grave’s at the same time?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It could. I’ve seen it before.  Yeah. It definitely can. So get—we’re  gonna really get patients on an autoimmune protocol to help lower any autoimmune attack from the food, from the gluten, from the leaky gut. And we’ll also work on blood sugar stability coz high and low blood sugar fluctuations have a major effect on the immune system.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Now another person asked here, the reason why you know I’m such a huge fan of how we do our podcast is coz it’s literally on the go and we’re infusing questions from people on YouTube here right into the conversations. So it’s like—remember those books you read when you’re like a kid and you read it and it’s like, “Oh, if you want the character to do this, turn to this page. If you want the character to do this, turn to this page.”  You can totally change how the book goes.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well, it’s kind how our podcast are. So interjecting here uhm—, Gerald asked, “What about T3? How does T3 work?”  Well number one, T3 can just help support low T3 levels. And if there’s some kind of conversion issue, that can kinda biased time to fix the conversion aspect, number one. Number two, giving that T3 in the Wilson protocol uhm— that can have some effect on clearing out the receptor sites. So that now the T3 works better and binds better uhm— in the future. You can do that by starting low and then tapering up, holding it and then tapering it back down. In the Wilson protocol, Dr. Dennis Wilson does that with time-released T3. But we do a glandular’s in it. That can still be helpful as well. We’re using that as a way of clearing out the receptor site but were also not, you know, thinking that that’s gonna be the only issue. We’re also banking that there’s other things that we’re gonna be fixing that will allow it to be a long-term solution, right?

Evan Brand: Got it. So you’re saying the thyroid glandular’s can be used for low—a low  T3 situation.  That’s the fix that’s going to get you better enough to keep moving the needle in other departments.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Correct. Like in my line, we have Thyro Balance which is a—a really glandular uhm—nutrient thyroid support from a glandular perspective. And then we have that we have Thyro Replete which is nutrients for the conversion. So there’s some herbs that help with conversion like coleus forskohlii and ginseng and then we have the nutrients for conversion that I mentioned—the vitamin A, magnesium, copper, zincs, selenium—all of those—and tyrosine’s. We wanna make sure all those are in there. Uhm so we hit it from all angles. I mean if we knew exactly what that missing like nutrient component was, we could hit it more practically. But it’s too difficult to do that.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You’re better off using multiple methods to hit it. That way the patient can get better faster.

Evan Brand: Agreed. And you mention the adaptogens. I’m so glad you did. We use those all the time. I take them every day in some shape or form, whether it’s ashwaganda, holy basil, shoshandra. There are so many options and people ask, “Well, can I just take a bunch of adaptogens and fix myself?” Uhm— it doesn’t work like that. You just want to use them as one piece of your toolbox. You still want to be getting to the root cause. So adaptogens are life-changing but if there’s root causes, you can take all the adaptogens in the world and it won’t fix you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I’m gonna take my ashwaganda right now—

Evan Brand: Perfect.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: A little bit of immune support. But I mean, like yeah, if you’re doing okay and you’re like, “Hey, Dr. J and Evan talked about some ashwaganda and some of these nutrients. I want to try it out.” Fine, go ahead.  But if you’re actively having issues that are you know, the symptoms that we mention here whether it’s on the hyper or hypo side, you really want to get someone on board to help guide you because it’s never just one magic bullet. It is—it’s a whole bunch of things that we’re doing together. And the more chronic it is, the more you have a you know, that momentum working against you. You got overcome that inertia to stop that— that snowball effect and start pushing it back uphill. So, yeah, if you’re in pretty good shape, fine you know just try some of these things. But if you’re in not so good shape, you want to reach out, for sure.

Evan Brand: Yep. Cool. Oh, we got time for one more question. Uh James said, “It’s not a thyroid question.” He’s taking an antibiotic for root canal this week. “Will this affect the result of organic acids test and stool test if he collects the samples while antibiotics are still in the system?”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I mean if we’re doing some of the genetic base testing, it shouldn’t have an effect on it. If we’re doing a stool base to antigen-based testing, then it would.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So you should be okay but we’re doing the G.I. map which is you know, what my go-to is. It should be okay according to the lab. I try to avoid it— doing it. So I would say in a perfect world, if it’s not gonna delay your treatment, I would say get to the antibiotics give it like a day or two to let it wash out and then do it. But if uhm— timing doesn’t work out, just do it, get done.

Evan Brand: I would also look at Mercola root canals and read about those. I mean maybe you’re too far down the rabbit hole and you can’t avoid the root canal. But you know there are some other options you may have available if you’ve got a good biological Dennis maybe will sit down with you and say, “Okay, root canal’s option A but maybe there’s a option B C you could look at too because we’ve had a lot of people to come to us with infected root canals and maybe Jessica can speak on this a bit. But I’ve seen it as a big needle mover for people.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. There’s a book by Ramiel Nagel that talks all about root canals. It is highly recommended. You take a look at it. Uh— fat-soluble nutrients, vitamin A, vitamin K are very helpful. Uh—oil pulling that kinda help extract any toxins that may be in there and you don’t want a root canal you want to get the tooth pulled out. Uhm— you want to get an implant put in using biologically appropriate material. You don’t want the gangrenous tissue still in the system without the blood flow. And the immune response to be able to get it is just a harboring place for a whole bunch of bacteria and viruses to hang out.

Evan Brand: Right. Yeah. Well said. So James, look into that. Maybe it’s not too late. Uh—hopefully, you’ve got some other options you can pursue it’d be much— much safer and much healthier in the long term. That way, you don’t have a hidden dental infection. There’s a guy named, Simon Yu that you and I should reach out and interview. He’s over in St. Louis he talks a lot about hidden dental infections. I think that’d be a good show.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. Absolutely. Hundred percent. So couple of things we wanna talk about. Oh, also carbohydrate, I think is important. Again, my bias is towards a lower carbohydrate template—Paleo template. And again, I hate the word “diet” because it assumes something is temporary and it assumes that it is fixed; where a template gives us flexibility and modification and may change day to day. It may change uh—meal to meal. I tend to be very lower carbohydrate my first two meals of the day and then after that, I may increase in carbohydrate at nights uhm—you know a bit of the starchy based. So I’m very strict during the day. It’s high-quality. It’s— set—it’s 60 to 70% fats, the only carbohydrates are vegetables and then good proteins and then I go higher at night. On the carbohydrates side, maybe a little bit of sweet potatoes and some butter and cinnamon or maybe I have a—some dark chocolate or have couple more berries than I normally would. So there’s that component. So I always go lower carbohydrate to start because so many people are insulin resistant just because of the fact that we eat too much carbohydrate and were inflamed. So I always go lower carbohydrate to start and then typically, patient will do be better and will feel better because insulin resistance can affect T4 to T3 thyroid conversion, which can cause lower temperature. Now, in the double edge side of the fence, if people go too low insulin, they may also get poor thyroid conversion as well. So just like I mentioned cortisol has a major effect on thyroid conversion. Well, guess what? Insulin has a major effect on thyroid conversion. Type I diabetics— guess what? With low insulin levels coz of the autoimmune attack to the beta cells of the pancreas, they have low body temperature. So if you go too low carbohydrate, and this is for certain individuals not everyone, I know people are gonna be like, “But I’m low carbohydrate and I felt great and it reverse my low temperature.” I get it. Again, there are exceptions to every rule. There are tall Chinese people that play basketball even though they are more shorter in the population. There are exceptions to everything, okay? We got to get that in. So yes, there are some people that a low carbohydrate diet, the majority I would say would help partly because our consumption of refined carbohydrate and sugar is higher, but there are some people when they’re chronically load, they may increase that carbohydrate just a bit. And that ups the insulin a little bit which then helps that thyroid conversion. They’re like, “ Dude, my hair started to grow back better, my temperature’s better, my energy is better.” Boom! You at least now figure it out for you. So exceptions to every rule, figure it out. And uhm—if you feel great going low-carb, great, keep it there, hang out. But if you start getting some of those hypo temperature symptoms, then we’ll just ratcheted up a little bit.  And I primarily ratcheted up starting at night.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: They’ll still get the benefit of keeping it lower carb during the day.

Evan Brand: Well said. I mean that’s me in a nutshell. I went very, very, very low-carb ketogenic, I guarantee. I was probably ketogenic most of the time and then I started to get cold and so I added in some starch with dinner and all of a sudden my body temperature’s perfect now. I feel good. So uh—if I go too low-carb again, it may come back or if there’s a huge piece of stress on my plate, the low body temperature may come back. But for now, I’ve been able to reverse this and been able to clear out all the infections with your help in terms of protocol a couple of years ago getting rid of all my gut bugs, plus supporting adrenals, getting the diet dialed in, getting my sleep improved, blacking out my room. All of those things are still important. So I hope this has been helpful. I gotta run. You’ve gotta run, too. Uhm—or are there any last questions that we could answer? I closed out the chat window. Uh there’s just one thing I want to say is it’s not about being higher carb or lower carb, have a –have a foundational template which you— which you go back to and then you can customize it. And then if you increase carbs, you can still get some of the benefits by having that first 20 hours of your meals relatively lower carb, higher fat, moderate protein and those last four hours you pop up a little bit and so you can still get some of those benefits. If you’re like, “Oh, I feel better with higher carbs.” You can still get the benefits of the first 20 hours of your day kinda in that ketogenic state and then pop up the carbohydrates later. So it’s not an either or thing. We can kinda straddle the fence but we want to customize it. I don’t give a crap if—if low-carb is your missing link and being low-carb all the time helps you, that’s what we’re gonna do. If being low-carb and a little more high carbohydrate helps you out, I don’t care. I’m all about the results and not about what tool I have to use to get the job done.

Evan Brand: Yup. Well said. For me that looks like the breakfast like a pastured sausage, maybe a handful of macadamias, maybe a handful of organic blueberries. Lunch—I  probably do some leftover steak and veggies like a big thing of broccoli with some butter. Dinner— that’s when I may do some type of pastured meat, a little bit of some veggies and then starch, so it could be a medium-size baked sweet potato, butter, cinnamon. That’s all it takes and I feel good. So just to kind of give people an idea what is that look like. That’s what it looks like.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. That’s great. And a couple of questions here. Uh— Stephanie talks about menopausal women with lower estrogen and a low estradiol vaginal tablets. Well, this is interesting because typically low estrogen can cause hot flashes. And why does that cause hot flashes? Because typically the FSH and the LH starts to rise in the pituitary which is that signaling hormone trying to yell to the ovaries to make more progesterone and estrogen. So when LH and FSH primarily FSH goes high, that can create some vasodilation effects and create the hot flashes. So by giving a little bit of thyroid—giving a little bit of uhm— female hormone support, we can drop down that FSH then we can also modulate the receptor sites with some herbs as well to help with how flashes. Whether we use maca, or  we use dong quia, or black cohosh or raspberry root, or shepherds purse. There’s different nutrients or herbs we can do to help modulate that. So again, you could still have hypo, low thyroid issues, but have menopausal issues because of the low estrogens, which could drive the hot flashes up. So it’s kind of a conundrum. The hot flashes may—may overshadow this low thyroid thing over here. So as we get the female hormones fixed, you may notice the low thyroid comes back later on because it’s just not a secondary issue and the primary issue is the menopause. Once that’s ruled out, now this one comes to the surface.

Evan Brand: Got it. Well said.  We should probably do a whole show just on low estrogen if we haven’t.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think that’d be great. I mean, I see estrogen dominance is a big problem.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Where estrogen –the ratio of estrogen is higher than progesterone, right? So progesterone should be like this 25 to 125 times more than estrogen. But if that ratio starts to creep up where estrogen gets higher, that’s estrogen dominance. The problem is a lot of people, though, where that ratio—they’re estrogen dominant, progesterone’s slow but estrogen is also low. So they get this estrogen dominant, but also low estrogen sums at the same time. So it’s kinda like this conundrum. It’s like this little tug of war that’s happening there.

Evan Brand: Wow. Put it on this to do list. It sounds like it’s gonna be a fun one for us to dive into more. And I’ve probably got some stuff to learn from you on that topic as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think it’s great. Well any last questions, comments, or concerns, Evan?

Evan Brand: No. I think this has been good. People, you got to get the testing run because if you don’t test, you’ve guessed. So if you’re trying to figure this out on your own, even if you’re not working with Justin or myself, then get the test run. Find a functional medicine practitioner they can take care of you. We are accepting new clients, so if you do need help, feel free to reach out justin health.com evanbrand.com We run these labs on all of our clients because it’s the foundation. We’ve got to have the data. We’ve gotta have the puzzle pieces on the table; otherwise, you can’t move the needle. We could throw a bunch of random stuff at you might help, can’t hurt, but we want to get you better. There’s a systemic process that we do step by step by step to take you through this. So happy to help. Reach out if you got questions and thanks for tuning.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh! One last thing, man. I forgot to add.  This is so important. Low calories.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Just not eating enough calories will cause low body temperature. It’s shown to cause a low level T3. Now this is important because if your diet is 25% crap Ola and let’s say you’re eating 2000 calories a day and then we switch you over— we switch you over to a uh— autoimmune kinda Paleo template, but you’re only able to—to—to switch over 75% of your diet because you don’t—you don’t have enough you—you can’t replace all the crap that you’re eating with the good stuff, right?

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Because if you’re eating a whole bunch of crappy carbohydrates and stuff and then you replace it with a whole bunch of really good vegetables or lower sugar foods, well guess what? You’re probably didn’t replace the calorie amount either. So now you got this 25% calorie deficiency. So now instead of having 2000 calories, right? Now you’re having 1500 calories and maybe metabolically you need 2000 calories. Now you’re 500 calories in the hole which means your 500 calories deficient of various nutrients. So now your metabolism goes low coz there’s less fuel. That’s important. I see a lot. So you gotta  work with someone that really can make sure you’re exchanging the foods and you’re getting enough calories as well. Coz calories equal nutrition. if you’re eating real foods.

Evan Brand: I’m glad you mentioned that. That’s such a simple but common issue. If you’re going AIP, you are going Paleo, you’re eating real foods, you could have an entire plate full of broccoli and it may only be 50 calories.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly.

Evan Brand: Yeah. Dude, great job. Way to kill it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And of course, the infections like you mentioned can really suck down the energy. Of course, acute infection, you know, you’re causing a fever, right? Because the immune system’s trying to up regulate itself because a lot of the bacteria and crap there uhm—they’re like—they’re mesophilic. They—they thrive in a medium temperature. So when you go a little bit higher, you can actually kill them off with a higher temperature. But these chronic bugs can really deplete the energy the body and create this kinda lower temperatures as well. For sure.

Evan Brand: Yeah. And I went—I went to low-calorie for a period of time, not intentionally, not on purpose. It just happened. I was eating meats, I was eating veggies and  I track my calories for a few days and I was eating m—and my activity level  and all that. I was probably 4 to 600 calories deficient. So just added in an extra tablespoon of butter here and there, half of an avocado here and there, handful of nuts and seeds. And I was right back up to where I needed to be.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Like here’s a seesaw right?

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So if like carbohydrate is here, if carbs go lower— this is fat over here. The fats have to go up.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: If you keep the fats here, you keep the fats on—on this side low, and drop the carbohydrates, that’s where the problem happens. The fats also have to go up. That’s the biggest issue. Proteins typically stay in the middle. Typically, proteins only go up if you’re doing a whole bunch of protein powders because proteins and fats are intimately connected. Uh so if you’re eating real whole foods, you know, it’s hard to get just proteins in whole foods, unless you’re doing maybe like venison or rabbit or like boneless chicken breast. But if you’re eating full fat foods, you’re gonna get fat. And then if you’re adding fats to your vegetables, you’re gonna get extra fat without the protein there as well.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So keep that at the back of your head.

Evan Brand: Perfect.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Anyone listening here, give us comments below. Give us some shares. Give us some likes. We want to hear thoughts in the comment section. If you’re listening to us on iTunes, that’s great. Click below and subscribe to our YouTube channel. You can see Evan and I’s mugs going back and forth in our little combos here. And then you can give us some comments below here on YouTube. We love the see the feedback. And Evan, hey man, you have a great day. We’ll talk soon.

Evan Brand: Take care.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Take care. Bye.

Evan Brand: Bye.

 


 

References:

justinhealth.com

evanbrand.com

https://justinhealth.com/products/thyro-balance

https://justinhealth.com/products/thyro-replete/

http://www.curetoothdecay.com/

Tips for a Healthy Pregnancy – Dr. Justin Live Podcast #153

Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Evan Brand dive into a discussion about having a healthy pregnancy. Gain some valuable information as they talk about nutrition, diet and lab tests before and during pregnancy.

Learn how different factors such as estrogen dominance, autoimmune  diseases, toxic substances and nutrition issues affect fertility. Find out about In Vitro Fertilization (IVF), understand the reason why some people choose this option of conceiving and discover some of the natural solutions and recommendations to health-related and nutrition issues that hinder people from having a natural and healthy pregnancy.

 Tips For A Healthy Pregnancy

In this episode, we cover:

11:08   Factors affecting fertility 

21:36   Food sensitivities and miscarriages

25:00   In Vitro Fertilization

35:14   Blood sugar in pregnancy

36:08   Thyroid issues in pregnancy

 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani YouTube channel

 


 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And we are live here. Dr. J in the house with Evan. Evan, how you doin’ man? How’s your day goin?

Evan Brand: Life is good. How are you doin’?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Very good. The first podcast officially as a dad—feels really good and really rewarding. Little bit sleep deprived and my wife is taking the brunt of it, but I’m doing my best to uh— be a supporting about— a very supportive husband providing all the nutrition she needs, cooking all her meals. We got a little fridge right outside the baby’s room put upstairs. And I got—it’s stuffed with bone broth, Kombucha, sparkling mineral water, uh— filtered water electrolyte and hence, she’s got a handful of meals. Paleo meals I already prepared. She’s got some really good healthy snacks. She gets some collagen smoothies and shakes up there, so I got her like stock up some. My goal is to try to feed the baby uh—kinda proxy, right? getting all the nutrition she needs and therefore, she could take it in as easy as possible and then provide the best nutrition for the baby.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Absolutely, man. Well, congratulations. I’m super happy for you. It’s been a— been a long time coming. When you’re waiting for stuff like this, a day feels like a week and a week feels like a year, so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And the baby’s name is Aiden Raymond Marchegiani. And Aiden means little fire, so. The boy— we’re really, really stoked to have him and we’re just trying to provide him as much nutrition as possible. He was in the NICU for a day and a quarter. Maybe two days, let’s just say. He had a slight collapsed lung birth. He was doing great and then as soon as the cord was cut, which we’re trying to delay clamping as much as possible—but it’s a C-section, right, so like you know while the baby’s got the cord attached, you know, mom’s open bleeding, right, so with the weighing out the benefits—

Evan Brand: Ahh..

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Normally we’d wait ‘til that cord with pulse turn til it’s white. You know, go white and such, which maybe 10 minutes or so. We didn’t quite have that luxury, so, you know, we framed it out with the OB. Had a time we delayed as long as we could, and as soon as that cord was cut, he crashed. His O2 suction levels dropped. They put a  C Pap on him. They got his O2 up; they run a chest x-ray and right after there’s a slight collapsed lung. But in a day and a quarter, day and a half—healed.

Evan Brand: Wow!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So he was super, super resilient. And we just—you know, we have to contribute the fact that my wife’s nutrition and sleep and all that stuff was just really great during her pregnancy. And that probably attributed to his resilience.

Evan Brand: I’m glad it all worked out.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: And you guys are home safe.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean the NICU docs were pretty—I think very shocked. They were telling me if we could be in there up to three weeks. And she was like, two days.

Evan Brand: Wow!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So it was pretty great to see that.

Evan Brand: So the people are probably like, “what happened?” you know, “You guys talk so much about holistic self why a C-section? Do you care to elaborate some of that?”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, yeah. Let’s talk about that. I’ve talked about it in other podcast, in other episode, but people may not listen everything, so will kinda make it so it all connects. My wife had a large fibroid removed about a year and a half ago— about the size of a baby’s head. There’s a very big fibroid. She’d taken birth control pills for 15 years, you know, in her late teens into her early 30s.

Evan Brand: You think that might have caused it?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think that’s a contributing factor if you listen to my podcast with Dr. Horwitz, he’s a fibroid expert and he says that you know, estrogen dominant states can definitely drive fibroid growth. There’s not a lot of research on it. I don’t think there’s gonna – there’s gonna be a lot of motivation to do a lot of research on it, but we know estrogen dominance can cause things like fibroids to happen. And then the question is, what can drive estrogen dominance, right? We know stress drives it. we know, you know, estrogens drive it. We know phyto estrogens, right? We know low progesterone states can drive it. We also know birth control pills can drive estrogen dominance, right? So it’s the milieu, the hormonal milieu. And also, just not getting pregnant. Getting pregnant later in life can also drive it because when you get pregnant, you’re really driving a progesterone dominance state. And then breast feeding, right, you’re keeping progesterone levels really high, too. So my wife got pregnant at age 40 and we decided that to get the fibroid removed just because one, it was so big and number two, we just have a smaller fertility window.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: The fertility window’s a lot smaller and we can get that fibroid removed we can get pregnant like that. And again, her hormones are that of a young 30 year old woman. So we had done work with her, helping her hormones, PMS, all that was really good. Her hormones were that of someone 10 years younger. She just had this big fibroid which acted like an IUD, right?

Evan Brand: Wow!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Intra Uterine Device which basically just— imagine this fibroid there just sucking up blood flow so that when an egg comes in, it’s not gonna be able to stick because there’s not enough blood flow to sustain it, right? So soon as that fiber was removed, we get pregnant. Two weeks after it was removed. And the doctor was like, “Okay, you know, you can try.” But he’s kinda not expecting much. But as soon as we tried the first time, we got pregnant. And yeah, we actually uhm— lost that baby but it was a blighted ovum. So none—is really a baby. There was no like heartbeat or anything, which is the sack but we lost it which was tough, but you know, we just kind of attribute it to the fact that she’s went to a major surgery, right? She was under general anesthesia. She’s on pain meds. Probably wasn’t the best time to try to get pregnant. We only did because the doctor said it would be okay. But as soon as you know, that— the hCG dropped and she got her period back, we tried again and then we got pregnant. So uh—that’s the baby we had now, Aiden, so, we’re very stoked. So the reason why we had to do the C-section, coming back, is because the incision was along the posterior section of the uterus which had kinda weaken the uterus which had her increase her chance of a uterine rupture. And because of that increased chance of a uterine rupture—the uterus rupture is you know baby and mom can die. So they had to pull the baby out four weeks sooner week 36 just to ensure that uterus wouldn’t rupture. It’s only a 1% chance but you know we spoke to midwives and OBs and no one recommended— no one would even do a natural birth.

Evan Brand: Oh, wow!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Just because of the liability was so high. But I was able to watch the whole entire surgery. And I literally—you know, they her uterus in her hand and I was like, “Hey, can you look at the backside?” This is after the baby was born. They turn at the backside. “How’s the posterior incision? Let’s look at it.” And she was like lookin’ at it, “I can’t even see an incision.” So the uterus healed up so strong and what I attribute that to is I have my wife on the Tru Collagen every day. She was doing about 30 g of collagen every single day. And I know that those collagen, amino acids had to— made a huge difference in helping to provide extra building blocks to the— to her uterus to heal up. But they couldn’t even see an incision to the back.

Evan Brand: Well, also, you mentioned she had no stretch marks, too, which is a pretty remarkable testimonial.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. She had no stretch marks. Again, the baby came four weeks early so some women will say, “the stretchmark comes that last 2 to 4 weeks” But again, in my opinion a lot of people are getting a lot of their protein from muscle meats which is, you know, still good. But, again, collagen is gonna be connective tissue protein. That’s ligaments, tendons, cartilage, hide skin, right? So you’re getting a lot more building blocks that are gonna help the connective tissue and the skin. And a lot of what’s happening with the stretching of the skin and the fascia and all that tissue is gonna be connective tissue-based. So I think that providing one, lots of healthy fats and two, providing all the extra collagen peptides really help number one, her uterus heal, number two help the skin heal and number three, I also think it will help uhm—the breast. A lot of women, their breast tissue kinda gets flattened and kind of, you know, really just kind of uhm—just flattened a bit. Maybe the breast will start sagging and hanging and such after a long time of breastfeeding. I think the connective tissue support will also help the integrity of the breast tissue as well.

Evan Brand: Ahh.. That’s interesting.t I believe that there’s probably gonna be benefits. I mean, I wonder if we compared standard American women compared to hunter-gatherer women. Like what was the difference in their skin quality probably huge difference coz the hunter gatherers eating the marrow and the collagen and the bones and doing more stuff than typical women do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean if you look at some of the anthropomorphic kind of research, like they talk about literally taking the organs and like harvesting them. And the organs would be like literally given to the women that were fertile, that were trying to get pregnant because they knew the organs were incredibly, you know, nutrient dense. And there’s also research to these women like would literally give birth uhm— that— that day and be back out on the field later on that day or that next day working.

Evan Brand: Wow!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It’s crazy, right? I mean they probably had a lot less stress in her life, too, right?

Evan Brand: True.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Very, very little stress, but still uhm— it’s amazing what the body is capable of doing. So that is kinda like my back stories that just kinda summarizing uh—history of fibroid and there are natural ways to reduce fibroids and I’ve seen them reduced and it help with those kind of situation in the past. We just—we’re dealing with the time window, right? And if a woman’s like in her 20s or early 30s and has a few years, hey, that may be a good thing to try, but in my opinion, uhm— you know, if you’re up against a pregnancy window, getting it surgically removed is good. But if you listen to my interview Dr. Horwitz he said women that he’s removed the same fibroid three times. So what does that tell you? That just because you remove a fibroid, that does not fix the underlying issue of why that fibroid is growing anyway, right?

Evan Brand: That makes sense. So the birth control, for example, could’ve been one thing. There gotta be an insulin components, my guess.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s probably an insulin component, too, for sure. There’s probably toxicity component too, right? Coz a lot of toxins are estrogenic compound.

Evan Brand: Yup. Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So there’s some of that. So we’re trying to do our best to support all that and again one, of the protocols will be doing is using some systemic-based enzymes or peptidase etc. to really help. She has one tiny fibroid still there. It’s in around the fallopian tube. The fallopian tubes is so patent. So it’s still open and I literally was like, you know, you’re yellin’ at the OB, “Hey, can you check out her left fallopian tube. How does it look?” She’s like, “Oh, that little, tiny fibroid—like you know, half of the fingernail, still there in the fallopian tube, but it’s not growing. So, you know, our goal is we’re gonna try to work on dissolving that one naturally uhm—you know, over the next few years.

Evan Brand: That’s amazing. So when it had to be cut out, you can just go in there with tweezers and yank it off or something, it’s not that easy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. The fallopian tube’s kinda—you could, but you’d compromise the fallopian tube.

Evan Brand: Oh, wow!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And the fallopian tube is still open, so it doesn’t make sense. She had one little, tiny fibroid actually uhm— there at the incision site, where they cut the uterus to deliver the baby. So actually, she got two for one. They removed that little baby fibroid at the incision.

Evan Brand: Wow! Did you see that? What did it look like?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I mean, it’s just—I got pictures of it, but uh—yeah, it’s just like a little, like mini golf ball.

Evan Brand: Really? And what—what’s the texture of it?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It’s kinda like uh—fibrous.

Evan Brand: Oh, that makes sense.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So like uhm—I’m trying to think of a consistency— it’s just— it’s dense but it’s a slight bit of squishiness to it, but it’s still—

Evan Brand: Yeah. That makes sense. That’s amazing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Almost like a tennis ball-like consistency.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: But it’s still pretty firm.

Evan Brand: Yup, I understand.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So that’s kinda like the back— the back history on myself and my wife but when you’re looking at fertility, right, we look at a couple of things. Number one: How are the hormones, right? How are the hormones? Number two: How—how are the pipes, right? Are the fallopian tubes open? How’s the endometrial lining? Is it—is it okay for something to be able to, you know, implant there. And then number three: is we look at the dad.

Evan Brand: Exactly.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: How’s the sperm count, motility, morphology. I was actually, really has no problem at that moment—that I was rock solid on all those numbers. So I felt very, very good about that.

Evan Brand: See that’s the problem, you know, You and I worked with so many— so many women. Primarily, men aren’t coming to us for fertility issues, but they have to come on board because it’s part of the equation. And a lot of these women that we speak with, the men, they just have a terrible diet. So we may put the mom or the future mom on AIP, but then the dad is still eating ice cream and pizza. And then they end up at the—in the—what do they call it, the vitro fertilization doctors, who want to spend what? 10-12-15 grand. But they may be unnecessary in most cases if we get the dad straightened out as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Exactly. I mean, a lot of times, you know, what’s gonna affect the fertility is number one: having a nutrient poor diet; not having enough high-quality nutrients like zinc and arginine and healthy fats and proteins. And then also uhm— mitochondrial support coz sperm needs mitochondria to move or needs a healthy mitochondrial nutrients to be able to the kind of propel it, so to speak, right? So we have to make sure a lot of the good mitochondrial support there. And then we’re just not putting a bunch of toxins in there, right? Like we’re avoiding the plastics, we’re avoiding the pesticides, the chemicals, the round up, the glyphosate—all these compounds that are not gonna be so good for it.

Evan Brand: Yeah. The endocrine disruptors like you mentioned, like the plastic, so getting men and women off of Tupperware. I guess, by the way, if you haven’t figured out, this topic we’re— we’re talking about fertility today. Since Justin and I are both dads and our wives are both moms. This is a good topic for us. We’ve had first-hand experience on. So this is not theory and there’s also some science behind what we talk about. But that the endocrine disruptors that can cause things like the PCOS, which a lot of women that come to us, they’ve had PCOS. Previously are there—they’re trying to get help in reversing PCOS. That can be a huge, huge hormonal function disruptor that can affect fertility. So we’ve got to get rid of the the plastics. Plastic straws are a big one because your saliva, you know, my opinion, you’re breaking down that plastic a bit and you’re absorbing some of the— the phthalates in the plastic softeners when you’re chewing and using straws as toothpicks, that’s not a good one. Also, you’ve got flooring, too, like vinyl flooring. So if you’re walking barefoot on a vinyl floor, that’s typically gonna have phthalates in it. You’ve also got issues with the men as well. They’re just as susceptible to exposure to phthalates and other type of toxins. You mentioned pesticide so definitely going organic. If someone’s a mom, a lot of times women they’ve already had her first kid but they wanna have another kid and they are coming to you or I would see that a lot, too. You know,  I tell a lot of moms have got to stay away from a lot of the playgrounds because they use the rubber tires, the recycled tire playgrounds and those are very, very toxic and I’ve measured moms with the GPL tox chemical profile test from Great Plains and they’ve got the rubber toxins off the chart. And I say, “where are you playing?” And they say, “Oh, we go to one of those playgrounds with the recycled rubber tires” And that stuff is just super toxic or let’s say the mom has a kid who started sports, my God, I work with the woman last week who lived in London, and her child he was off the charts himself. So we haven’t tested mom yet, but we tested the kid coz we’re working more with him than her. And the kid was off the charts with 2,4-D— the agent orange chemical that they used in Vietnam. And I said you know, “Where are you guys playing?” And she goes, “Oh, he plays soccer” I said, “Is that football or soccer?” Coz she call it football. So is that football football or is that soccer?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Evan Brand: And so she’s on the field with this kid multiple times a week. In the field, just sprayed, I’m sure, pounds and pounds and pounds of glyphosate and 2,4-D

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean I kinda go back and forth, what’s worse, right, being on the artificial turf stuff or being on the grass? Coz you know the grass has given a whole bunch of chemicals, right?

Evan Brand: I Know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So I—for me, and again, how many research? I’m just—a lot of what I do is common sense and based clinically.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Coz I probably rather be on the synthetic turf grass because at least you know it’s not being spray with round up.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: ..and pesticides all the time.

Evan Brand: I know. I don’t think they spray anything. One other thing about men, you know, when we’re talking about fertility for men, sperm quality. Heavy metals is huge. Mercola had an article about infertility where he was talking about how men are much more susceptible to issues in their fertility with heavy metals than eggs. So the eggs in the female were less affected by heavy metals and other pollutants than men. So that’s pretty interesting. A lot of guys have metal amalgams in their mouth. So we may— I’ve not personally had to go that far with any of my clients but what would you say? Would you say that could be a possible step? Does the man have to— may have to get a amalgam removal is done?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean I think that’s definitely an option. If we’re seeing elevations in heavy metals—anytime I have someone a male with fertility issues, once the diet’s good and we’ve eliminated toxin exposure, then it’s about what nutrients can we add to enhance sperm quality, and then what things can we add to enhance detoxification.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Maybe phase I or phase II detoxifying nutrients and maybe things to help push the heavy metal binding. So again, I’d wanna look at all that and if we’re seeing high levels of metals, and we know Mercury’s there, and then we’re seeing the person also the history of fillings— heavy metal fillings and then we wanna get that removed.

Evan Brand: Tapwater. Gotta have a good clean water that the person is drinking. We talked about the— the phthalates. So the xeno estrogens—coz that’s gonna affect the males.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So if the male is more like a woman, you know, he’s got a lot of excess breast tissue and things like that, and we can assume, “okay you’ve probably got some estrogen problems” So just like you mentioned about females. Same thing for men, it could be an estrogen dominance problem.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And we can look at that from two perspectives. I did a video called the “Hormone Switch” I recommend everyone to take a look at that. Will try to put links below for the “Hormone Switch” But when men’s blood sugar’s off, when they start moving into a direction of insulin resistance, they increase this enzyme called aromatase, which causes the hormone to switch. It will cause their testosterone to go more towards estrogen. And we see that quite frequently. And again, one of the best thing get one of the best thing you can do is put on more muscle. That will make you more insulin sensitive. A high intensity training type of regimen where you’re doing like a long, slow movement to get muscle activation or to get HGH, where you’re doing interval stuff. That’s gonna help significantly get the blood sugar under control and get the inflammation under control. A lot of these stuff, we always go back to the foundation coz we know there are people that are new that are listening every day so we don’t want to assume that the foundation is there. And all of our patients that listen, you know, listeners they get that. We kinda feel like a broken recored, but just to emphasize for new listeners.

Evan Brand: Yeah. We wanna get rid of dairy. I mean that’s gonna be huge on the diet piece. We’re talking about or talk about stabilizing blood sugar; we’re getting refined carbs out; were getting sugars out, but dairy, too. You know, depending on what piece of research you look at, that could be 60 to 70% of the estrogens consumed is coming from dairy, especially these cows that are not organic. So for us, the dairy is always gonna come out. Organic veggies are always good come in, organic fats, your nuts, your seeds, your vegetables. Unless the woman has some type of like Hashimoto’s problem which that can complicate things with fertility. Sometimes if there’s a thyroid issue, but let’s just assume that the person can do a good quality butter, can do some nuts, some seeds, maybe a little game meat even. That’d be cool. If we could get the mom eating some—some deer, or some type of game organ meats, or sardines.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand:..or other home-cooked, home-sourced wild turkey, which we have ton of turkeys here. Those are awesome, too. Unfortunately, it doesn’t seem like local fish is an option here in Kentucky. I was reading the report by the Kentucky Department of Fish and Wildlife. They said that most of the fish are toxic here, unfortunately. With the— with high levels of mercury. So they set for people wanting to get pregnant or pregnant people should avoid the fish, which kinda sucks.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Actually when it comes to the fish component, uhm—I have an article that I give my patients but really, it comes down to number one: trying to get the wild—you know, the wild Alaskan or like some kind of flash frozen, kinda wild fish, I think is great, is ideal. But it’s looking at the selenium to mercury ratio. Because fish are going to have a little bit mercury. The question is, “Is there enough selenium to combat it?” Because the selenium is the natural chelator of mercury. So just try to choose high selenium to mercury ratio fish. So skip Jack tuna. It’s gonna be the best type of fish off the bat uh—cod, haddock, sole, halibut. Those things are good. I have a good article in my member’s area for my patients. But if you just google like “high selenium to mercury ratio fish” you’ll get a nice list there.

Evan Brand: Uh—cool. I love cod, haddock. Those are awesome. I had something pulled up. I was trying to see I may have lost it, but just mentioning the link between food sensitivities and also miscarriages. Basically what happened is the link between having some type of allergenic reaction, you’ve got the cytokines that are basically suppressing the killer cells.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Evan Brand: But when the immune system is off, the body can accidentally attack the egg. So basically, long story short, it sounds like just searching, investigating and finding out for food intolerances, which we’re gonna push most people into kind of a Paleo template as the starting place. Probably no grains, but at least no gluten, no dairy as a starting place. Will probably gonna rule a lot of those food intolerances out within the first month.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Even push to autoimmune shtick as well. I know you kinda talk about a deer. That’s good when you’re doing autoimmune shtick, but I think adding at least back in the ghee and definitely the butter, as long as you can tolerate it, as long as like, there my patients are following the reintroduction protocol, which is adding the food back in over a three-day period. Gently increasing the amount as long as no negative reactions that’s fine coz you know, butter butyric acid’s a 1:6 uhm— carbon fatty acids. So it’s a medium chain triglycerides, so to speak, right? It’s very short chain length. It’s four carbons or six carbons, but it’s a really good fat; it’s a lot of nutrition, a lot of vitamin K which is really, really good for fertility uhm— so that’s uh—excellent fat as long as you can tolerate it, I think that’s great.

Evan Brand: And other bad things, too, like alcohol.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Of course. Like alcohol number one: it’s a toxin. Again, in moderation maybe okay but number two: it gets metabolized to sugar. So if you have a little bit insulin resistance or blood sugar stuff, that can be a stressor. Again there’s ways to hack it by just using higher-quality alcohol and by timing it with protein and a little bit of fat uh—with your meals. It can slow down some of the absorption but you know, for a time period, if you have health issues, cutting it out for a month or two maybe a good idea to start with. And then choosing some of the drier, you know, white wines or drier champagne or Presecco or doing a really clean tequila or really clean vodka. Again, my Dr. J Moscow mules is one of my go-to’s  use with uh—Tito’s vodka and the ginger Kombucha and some lime. Or I just do a really good like Sean Don or like a really good brewed Presecco, very dry. I like the bubbles. Bubbles are uhm—you know the uh— the seltzer or like the CO2 carbonation. The bubbles are actually—there is actually research studies where they increase alcohol absorption with the bubbles. I was reading one study. I was like, “Damn, I love  to be in the study.” Like— you know, 15 years ago when I was in college, they were like, “ Yeah. We had a group of college kids and we gave one group alcohol and one group alcohol with you know carbonation and soda water.” I’m like, “that’s a great study for college.” Right? I know like, yeah, the group that got the carbonation with their alcohol uhm—you know, felt the effects, felt the intoxication effects or the buzz, you know, the so-called buzz effects sooner. So there’s some research with the carbonation in there helping to absorb the alcohol. So what does that mean, right? It means you’re a cheaper date.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You— less of it to get that same buzz, which means less toxicity on the liver. So that’s why like add the bubbles in there, that’s better. And you get that with my Dr. J Moscow Mule. Uh—you can do it as well with my Norcal margarita and we just you know, do a little bit of soda water in there when you can also do a really dry Sean Don or brewed Prosecco kinda drink there.

Evan Brand: Perfect. Let’s talk about IVF just for a minute. A lot of people and you know, the in vitro fertilization is like the first step if they are struggling. Diet, lifestyle, stopping smoking, which is insane. My wife had some friends that she’s not friends with them anymore because they’re just there were not good people overall. So we— we cut them out. They were too toxic in many ways.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: Emotionally and physically, smoking cigarettes around her when she was pregnant, all sorts of crazy stuff. So we got rid of them.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s hard for someone to truly be emotionally balanced and healthy if they’re not physically healthy because the mind-body connection is just— it’s so strong, right?

Evan Brand: I know. Uhm—so anyway— but these people that used to be her friends.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Evan Brand: The guy, the dad, they were struggling with years. I think they were in their early 30s. They were struggling for years. They still do not have a child to this day. The guy was drinking beer almost every weekend, daily smoking of cigarettes, Mountain Dew’s. But yet they went to an in vitro fertilization doc and they were gonna spend 10 or 15,000 for the therapy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: It’s just insane. You’re not addressing the root cause.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No, you’re not. I mean, typically the first, you know, thing they’re going to do is they’re gonna do some kind of Clomid or FSH stimulating drug. The core goal of that is to increase the eggs, increasing amount of eggs, right? So they’ll do like Clomiphene Citrate or some kinda Clomid and then depending on sperm quality. If the sperm count is low, they may do IUI which is like intrauterine insemination kinda fancy turkey baster.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: The sperm up and they may wash it and stuff and pick the best ones and then they’ll inject it right into the uterus. So then there’s no journey of these guys have to— the sperm cells have to make to get up there, right? Coz if they’re a little bit more mitochondrial depleted, or they don’t have good mor—motility, like they’re not moving in the right direction or their shapes not good. They may not be able to make the journey. So the whole idea is to use that uhm—artificial turkey baster. You can get it right there, so their journey is shorter, right? You’re cutting their journey down by 80% and then they’re stimulating the heck out of the eggs. That’s the first step. And the next step is full IVF which is they’re basically giving you drugs like Lupron to shut down your HP AG access, you know, your hypothalamus pituitary axis, And they’re gonna give drugs to stimulate FSH. Uh—they’re gonna give drugs to then manipulate ovulation. And then they’ll probably give some kind of uh—progesterone afterwards to help hold the implantation of the egg. That’s pretty much the cookbook. There are new medication that comes in—Gonal-F, Follistim, Lupron. All these different drugs may be used uhm—but the goal is kinda the same— stimulate, you know, egg production, enhance ovulation, help hold onto uhm— progesterone levels so the eggs stick better.

Evan Brand: Well, I remember seeing a picture. I think it’s a picture of my wife that showed me where this couple had had hundreds of vials— like an entire couch or an entire floor full of vials that were daily injections, I believe, for that whole process. Which this is one: it’s expensive; two: that just doesn’t sound very fun; and three: in a lot of cases, I don’t have any numbers. I’m not gonna make up a number on the spot, but in so many cases, if you just address diet, lifestyle infections, thyroid health, adrenal health, you’re doing the fatty acids like you talked about, the collagens, your zincs and selenium’s, and your natural folate’s, and your vitamin C, and your omega-3’s, it’s like that’s a prescription that’s gonna have far higher success rate and it’s gonna be virtually free because you have to eat to survive. So you’re going to be eating all these good things, anyway.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. And we do things like chase tree and tribulus to modulate LH and FSH. So like that will modulate FSH; the tribulus will modulate LH with chase tree. And these are things that help talk—help the brain talk to the end gonads, you know and create stimulate the follicle or help the progesterone, right? So will do that with some herbs. We can always c_  augmentation protocol where we put estrogen—I’m sorry—progesterones in there, right? at certain times of the cycle, day 15-27. We can even add in some uterine supporting herbs like maca, m__, dong quia, alpha alpha, raspberry leaf extract. These are great uterine tonic herbs that really help the blood flow get to the uterus which is good because that uterus— these adequate blood flow to help support that egg when it sticks. So I tell patients think of progesterone as a sticky glue that helps the egg hold, but we need good uterine flow. That’s why my wife and I had a hard time getting pregnant at first because we have this fibroid that was sucking a lot of the angiogenesis out, right, the angiogenesis’ blood flow. So it’s creating a lot of blood flow to the fibroid and not to whatever else was gonna stick there i.e. the egg.

Evan Brand: So did you all have to do herbs? Or did you do herbs or just the diet lifestyle is all you needed?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh—we had herbs going in the background the whole time.

Evan Brand: Okay.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We had that the whole time there and uhm— a little bit of progesterone going as well. And again, we just— I measured it, like I want 15 or higher, 20 is ideal. So Iike after she got pregnant, we measured progesterone. We make sure it was adequate. And it was, so we pulled off it.

Evan Brand: And what were you doing? Like drops or—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Progesterone drops. Yup. Exactly. So, like typically like a 100 mg is a good starting point once you get pregnant. And again, we just monitor it and it just kept on rocking. And again, if the ACG is high enough, typically the progesterone will be high enough because the hCG is uhm—gonna be produced by you know the follicle and also the placenta will kick in and produce it as well. And that hCG will then jack up the progesterone, too.

Evan Brand: Oh, that’s cool. all that’s cool okay you didn’t you didn’t have to continue, you’re saying?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Correct. You know, we didn’t have to. But some women who have lower progesterone, they may have to keep that progesterone going for the first trimester.

Evan Brand: Now is that something you have to get via prescription or are there over-the-counter natural ones you can get?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It depends. I mean, I typically give my sublingual one until I can get the fertility OB to write one, just more from a legal standpoint. I rather have the OB write about identical prescription just so, you know, if they’re working with that person that we know it’s covered. But the protocol is gonna be the same and typically will do like an intervaginal uhm— progesterone just so we know it’s getting right to the tissue. It’s—it’s— it’s being released closest to the tissues. So will do that. If we have an option, some OBs that they won’t do it uhm— just because they’re not looking at the progesterone or because a woman doesn’t have a—a history of miscarriage. They’re not gonna even look at it. But I mean, do you really wanna go through a miscarriage then know your at risk to then wait to the next time to do it?

Evan Brand: No joke. Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I rather be monitoring it. And you know, if it’s below 15 or you know, I’m gonna be supplementing with some progesterone to make sure their support there. You can’t go wrong with it. Just make sure you’re using the good-quality progesterone. And again, we’re giving a lot of clinical advice here. And there maybe a lot of people that are just lay people listening. I don’t recommend doing this by yourself if you really want to work with the provider that’s done this a lot, so uhm— you know what’s going on and you wanna have everything looked at. So you want to make sure that we’re supporting the adrenals. Typically when someone’s pregnant, the only thing I’ll keep them on are nutrition, nutrients, whether it’s vitamins, minerals, amino. I’ll typically keep them on probiotics, I’ll keep them on digestive support, HCL enzymes and the only hormone I’ll typically keep them on, when they are pregnant, if it’s necessary “necessary” is the progesterone.

Evan Brand: Yup. Well said. Well that’s the thing. We love talking about adaptogens so much but nobody’s gonna do the research on rhodiola or these other herbs and how they could impact the fetus. So we just, you know, we love those things but we just can’t safely recommend them because we just don’t know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It’s probably safe, but again, like, think about it, who’s gonna sign up for that study?

Evan Brand: I know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Whose gonna sign up? “Hey, by the way, congrats! You’re pregnant. Hey we’d love to have you sign up for this study where we test these adaptogenic herbs on health and viability”  “Uh—no, I’m good.

Evan Brand: Right. So I mean—some of it we can draw from—from ancient peoples what they’ve used. Like you mentioned the chase tree which has been used in extreme long time. So a lot of it, we’ve probably already lost due to just modern life. We’ve lost touch with our hunter-gatherers, what herbs and plants and trees and stuff that they use during pregnancy, unfortunately. But like you said, diet lifestyle, foundations, HCL, enzymes, probiotics, fish oils, vitamin D. Did you hit— did you mention that one?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: We did not. But vitamin D is definitely important. We have to have to look at potentially even give my baby a little bit extra. I was speaking to one of the in the neonatal uhm— docs there and he was telling me you know, you may want to give your child an additional above and beyond what’s in the breast milk 400IU sublingually uhm— for the baby. So we’re looking at getting some extra bit of that, but, you know, we’re gonna weigh it out. If we can get the kid out there at 8 AM in the morning 15 minutes out in the sun at 8 AM that may be enough, right?  We don’t even need the drops.

Evan Brand: Yeah. What the—lady we spoke with said. She said as long as my wife was getting 6 to 8000 units that which I think this is just probably her making up numbers on the spot but she said that if my wife were supplementing with 68,000 units daily that the baby would probably end up getting at least 500 to 1000 units from that that would pass through.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think that, too. I asked that and they were like, well you should still give it. But it’s probably like a CYA comment.

Evan Brand: Exactly.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You don’t know exactly, but I think if she’s getting 6 to 10,000 the day, I think you’re gonna get 5% transfer to the—the baby in the breast milk.

Evan Brand: I guarantee it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think it’s probably good. So we’re probably gonna make sure she just getting 10,000 a day with the K2 and just get the kid out in the sun a couple times a week in those early morning hours and you know, just enough to give him a little sun kiss. Nothing else.

Evan Brand: Yup. Do you wanna talk about lab test for a couple minutes and just talk about what we would recommend someone get if before they even think about conceiving. You know, we kinda talk about pregnancy and birth and delivery and all that, but really, it begins far before that. So you and I kind of talk a bit like a five or six trimester is really what pregnancy is coz you gotta do the preparation then the postnatal care is important, too. So vitamin D—we hit on that. As a blood panel, insulin or blood sugar if you knew you, had a history, you could get the stuff done. Uh—fasting insulin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: The fasting insulin’s great. We want less than seven, ideally, less than five. We may even want to just do some functional glucose tolerance testing, i.e. just testing your blood sugar with a blood sugar meter. Fasting one hour, two hour, three hours after a meal. Choose a couple of different meals a couple times a week, breakfast, lunch and dinner. Some people we hire in the morning coz of the somogyi effect which is totally cortisol driven. So you’ve gotta keep that in mind.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And uhm–  I would say, we’re gonna do an adrenal test, for sure. And we may just do a female hormone test around day 20. We’re looking at estrogens and progesterones and such and testosterone, but if there’s a more of a fertility history there, we may run was called the “month-long test” or on the 209 panel from Bio health which is a month-long panel. Will look at progesterone level starting at day 2 every other day in the cycle.

Evan Brand: Thyroid markers. I’m gonna look for antibodies, your TPO, your TG antibodies..

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Evan Brand: To see if there’s autoimmune going on.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. If there’s some history going on, or symptoms, will definitely do it, but you know, TSH, T4,T3 antibodies, reverse T3’s is great. And you know, one of the things that I give my wife during pregnancy is a couple hundred extra micrograms of iodine a day. There’s some good research about helping the babies IQ. So we did a little bit of that.

Evan Brand: You can have a genius baby now.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Now the goal is to give the kid all of the all the resources it possibly can, right? That’s the goal of you know, being a great mom and great dad is giving your kid as much potential as possible. And a lot of that’s gonna be uhm— healthy pregnancy, right? Healthy nutrition, healthy prenatal nutrition.

So healthy fats, healthy protein, healthy carbs, nutrient density has to be high, inflammation has to be low and uhm— making sure there’s enough calories and good macros. And we’re going a little bit higher on the carbs right now. But this is true when you eat for two.

Evan Brand: A 100% man. Tell me, my wife, she— she ate way more than me and she still—she actually weighs now than she did before she got pregnant which is interesting. I mean—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s a great benefit in breast feeding.

Evan Brand: It’s definitely depleting, though. It can be depleting, so we’re doing our best to keep her— to keep her full and—and satiated.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We also did placenta encapsulation as well.

Evan Brand: Oh, sweet man. Yup. Cool.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I actually have pictures of a placenta. It’s pretty cool.

Evan Brand: I planted my wife’s with a tree.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Really? Wow!

Evan Brand: A little tree sprout, a little maple tree sprout at our old house. I had the placenta coz we’re going to do encapsulation. We had a doula that’s gonna do it for us, so we decided—she felt so good postnatally that she didn’t need it. And—and so I had the placenta in the freezer, took it out so I could actually mold at first, you know, mold it a little bit and dug uh— dug a giant hole, buried it couple feet under with the— with the little maple sapling right there. So there should be a tree there one day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow! That’s amazing. So we had it encapsulated, so she’s doing three capsules 3 to 4 times a day. And then we have uhm—we actually had a  tincture made, too, which is pretty cool.

Evan Brand: A placenta tincture?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah. And we’re gonna save that for menopause for her.

Evan Brand: Really?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: When she transition to menopause, we’ll use that tincture.

Evan Brand: That’s a thrift.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Isn’t that cool?

Evan Brand: I did not know that. So what’s—what’s the idea there? There’s gonna some naturally occurring hormones in the placenta that will help to ease menopausal symptoms?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Exactly.

Evan Brand: Ahh—Okay. We’ve got uhm—we’ve got a couple questions. I think they may not be related to our topic because our topic’s pretty niche today. But do you want to look at these questions here?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. We try to grab the ones that are most relevant for sure.

Evan Brand: Okay. There was a person named, Chris here, that said he was diagnosed with Hashimoto’s and is displaying signs of hypoglycemia with perfect blood sugar, what could it be? That’s gonna be a good question. Do you get that question?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So his blood sugar may look good but why does it look good, right? The question is— are the adrenals coming to the rescue to make that

Evan Brand: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Coz if the adrenals are coming to the rescue and lifting that blood sugar up, there’s gonna be a lot of cortisol and adrenaline in the background which are gonna create a lot of anxiety, and mood issues, and irritability, and a lot of things where your blood sugar may look good, but the question is, what’s lifting that blood sugar up? Ideally, we want healthy blood sugar by diet, meal timing, nutritional density so the blood sugar is lifted up naturally not relying on the adrenals to keep it lifted.

Evan Brand: Yeah. With the adrenals are kind of the backup generators of the adrenals are getting involved with your blood sugar regulation, that’s not good. That means something else is off elsewhere, but if the diagnosis of Hashimoto’s is there, too, could we say that if—if there signs of hypoglycemia maybe it’s not hypoglycemia, maybe it’s thyroid as well because I mean the thyroid can make you feel like your fatigued and lethargy and then all of a sudden, you’re over stimulated.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. If you have hyp—If you have Hashimoto’s there’s probably potentially some T4 to T3 conversion issues.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And there’s probably some adrenal issues so all that stuff needs to be looked at and then again, we don’t even know where that— this person is in the hierarchy of diet and lifestyle.

Evan Brand: Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So we’re assuming that diet and lifestyles are already even adjusted. 30 g of protein in the first waking, eating— eating healthy proteins, fats and the right amount occurs every 4-5 hours or assuming that that’s already dialed in.

Evan Brand: In preferably on an AIP approach and until the antibodies are very, very minimal in the single digits or less.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. If possible, I typically wait till there’s a there’s plateauing of uh symptoms. Some people may not be able to get them all the way low but you know, we at least want to get them under 500 or so. It depends. If we could get  someone under 500, that’s a pretty good reduction.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Again—

Evan Brand: What’s the highest you’ve seen with TPO? I think the highest I’ve seen was like 1600 on a TPO.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I’ve seen over 2000. I mean I have patients literally go from over 2000 to under hundred.

Evan Brand: Yup. What’s the timeline? A year?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I’ve seen it happen in six months to a year.

Evan Brand: Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup. The average person that I work with, we have at least a 50% reduction in antibodies.

Evan Brand: Right. That’s awesome. I love seen that on a piece of paper. When you actually get to validate it, but then their symptoms are better, too. It’s such a double win.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh and I had so many patients say their endocrinologist just says, “there’s nothing you can do about that”

Evan Brand: No.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And it’s like over and over again, and we just continue to prove them wrong and it’s just like, “man!”

Evan Brand: It’s a great feeling.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I feel so bad. It’s just like, you know, imagine having someone like, you know, hiring someone to fix your house and all they have is just a hammer. It’s like, “dude, you’re missing the saw and the screwdriver, this and everything” It’s like functional medicine is that we get so many tools at our disposal. We’re not limited to just like that one pharmaceutical tool that’s supposed to be in our toolbox, right?

Evan Brand: Yup. Well the same thing with fertility question. I mean, you and I have  talked to dozens and dozens of men and women who’ve been told that they will never be able to have children, yet we’ve aided, and many, many babies, you know, just being made by helping women get their hormones back on line and fixing the underlying issues, so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s it, man. I 100% agree. So, I hope that helps there. Anything else we can grab before__

Evan Brand: Yeah. Let’s see what we have here. That was unrelated questions—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Someone was asking about Probio Flora and Sacro Flora. And again, those are some of my probiotic products. Sacro Flora is a high-dose saccharomycin, Probio Flora is a high-dose bifido-lactobacillus uhm—probiotic. We typically do that for at least 60 days after a parasite killing protocol.

Evan Brand: Here’s a good— here’s a good question here from Naomi. She said she’s been diagnosed with blastocystis hominis, which for those listening, that’s a common parasite infection we see. She’s exclusively breast-feeding a six-month-old and the antibiotic metronidazole did not seem to work. “Is it possible to treat while still feeding baby?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: The only way I would treat it is with probiotics right now. I would not do any herbs. I would choose two probiotics. I would do Saccharomyces and high-dose probiotics that’s the only thing I would do right now to treat it.

Evan Brand: Yup. So, Naomi, when the time comes for you to wean off the baby which if it six months this may be another year or so, we don’t know how long you intend to breast-feed, at that time, reach back out to us. Justin and myself we can help you get rid of the blasto using herbs but, yeah, with these anti-parasitic herbs, we—we just— it’s just not—not a safe. Well it might be safe, but we just don’t know. We don’t know if that’s—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It probably would be safe, but we don’t want a chance and we rather be just conservative, right? Always do no harm. So I feel very comfortable recommending probiotics. There’s been studies done on kiddos, actually, looking at Saccharomyces polarity uh—compared to Flagyl Metronidazole Tri and Blasto, and it’s just as good, if not better.

Evan Brand: Yup. So look it up, Saccharomyces polarity. Check out Justin’s, we both got Saccharomyces polarity products. There’s a lot of good ones out there. Just make sure you get professional grade, so that actually works.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly.

Evan Brand: Cool. Yeah, I think that’s it, man. We can wrap it up. Will send people back to your site if you wanna learn more about you or work wit you. justinhealth.com  myself, evanbrand.com  Check us out. We’ve got hundreds and hundreds of episodes. So if we just hit the surface of one piece of the conversation you like today, then I’m sure we dove deep somewhere else and give us a review. I know you may be watching elsewhere, YouTube, Facebook etc. but iTunes is where it counts. So we need to continue to beat out people like Jillian Michaels who promotes just not sound advice and so we wanna really bring functional medicine to the forefront of humanity and help to save some of the crises that are going on in terms of depression, anxiety, infertility, obesity diabetes, cancer. We want to put a dent in the universe. So give us a review so that we can do that and stay in the top of the charts.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Awesome! And you guys, subscribe right now, my YouTube, justinhealth.com; Evan’s YouTube. Uh— click on our YouTube link. We appreciate the subscriptions, care—you know, sharing is caring. We love it. And again, give us feedback. We want feedback about what you guys want to hear because this is all about how we can serve you guys better. So let us know so we can provide more awesome information. And again, what makes us different Evan I different is, we keep it real. You’re gonna walk away from our show and our podcast with actionable item not esoteric BS that’d gonna make sense you up in the ether, right? But what can you actually do. So that’s how we’re different. We’re trying to keep it real and make it actionable for you guys. So we appreciate you listening. And everyone have a great day.

Evan Brand: Take care.

 


 REFERENCES:

https://justinhealth.com/products/sacro-flora/

https://justinhealth.com/products/probio-flora/

https://justinhealth.com/products/trucollagen/

justinhealth.com

evanbrand.com

Bridgit Danner – Hormone Balance After 40 – Podcast #138

Click here to sign up for the “Hormone Balance After 40” Summit!

Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Bridgit Danner engage in a discussion about hormone issues in women at the age of 40. Learn how hormones work and understand their driving factors and effects on women. 

Gain beneficial information about hormonal balance and imbalance. Find out about the diseases one can get from an unbalanced diet and lifestyle. Be informed on ways to cope with hormonal problems as Dr. Bridgit Danner shares some tips and natural solutions based on her knowledge and expertise as a functional medicine doctor.

Bridgit Danner

In this episode, we will cover:

11:05   How Sugar Intake Affects Hormones

25:35   Relationship Between Cholesterol and Menopause

33:10   Liver Detoxification and Hormone Balancing

39:52   Supplements to Balance Hormones

46:53   Cortisol Spikes at a Time in a Day
itune

 

 

youtuve

 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hey there. It’s Dr. Justin Marchegiani. Today we have Bridgit Danner on the Podcast, really excited. She’s got a new summit, “Hormone Balance After 40,” coming out in the next few weeks, so we’re excited to talk about some female hormone issues and drop some serious knowledge bombs today. Bridgit, how are you doing?

Bridgit Banner: Great. Thanks for having me on Justin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Great. Well, I know we kind of were doing a little recording earlier and got cut off, but let’s continue with that question. So you did a summit. You interviewed lots of experts on female hormone issues. What were those top three nuggets that you gleaned from the summit. Now, obviously there will be a “Summaries” we want everyone to tune in. We’ll put links below so people can access this great info too. But what are those couple of tidbit nuggets?

Bridgit Banner: Yes, and I say number one is, you know, menopauses. Inevitable. But uh– your symptom level is changeable. So, you know, it’s not like oh well I just have to have Hot Flashes, or gain 20 pounds, or…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: …get an Ambien like, no. So- but just like you do on your practice, it’s often getting to the root of like, “how did you get into perimenopause”, “in an imbalance state, are you exposed to toxins”, “do you have a gut infection”, “are your adrenals running down.” So, you know it can be a- a tough time for women, but also a great time to like okay– like maybe I’ve been ignoring my health a bit as I’ve crushed my 30’s and like raised kids. And, you know, now it’s like I’m starting to feel something’s catching up to me. You know, I want to eat well. I want my hormones to be as balanced as they can. And there is, there is a lot to be offered. And there’s a lot to learn. So that’s, that’s one thing. Another thing we talked about a minute ago was uhmm– the good fats and oils. Wow, just– there’s like, one great tip I have for women at this age group is adding in some beneficial oils that help your hormone production, help your prostaglandin production, uhhmm–, things like borage oil and hemp oil. These, these things, they’re not food we eat, really.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: You know. We talked about Paleo. Yeah great. There’s some great ingredients there but, like, no one eats, like, borage flowers.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Borage oil or black currant seed oil too.

Bridgit Banner: No. No one has those things.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: So those can be some really beneficial supplement. Uhhmm– another one comes to mind is sleeping. You know, working on improving sleep quality at this age because it can really be disrupted as your hormones change. But yeah, it’s so important because we’re healing. And yeah I wrote an article like sleep is our fountain of youth because we have all these growth hormones that happens when we sleep. So it’s so important to get good night sleep. There’s lots of things we covered. One talk I really liked was on metabolism, which I think is like, women are just like, “Oh well, I’m screwed after 40, you know, my metabolism.” But that’s not really true though. And that can be, that can be hacked. Uhhmm– it’s just mentioning Dr. Rina Marie ____?Liscosov?____...

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: … on awesome talks about blood sugar and how balancing blood sugar is, is incredibly powerful as we age to, you know, stay energetic. So, yeah. Lots of, lots of good options. There is hope.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Very cool. And you mentioned that first one where you’re talking about prostaglandins or the eicosanoids, which are the same thing. And we have kind of our, our One, Two, and Three pathway. The Two is really, like, the inflammatory, like the pro, like, the refined vegetable oil tend to go that pathway a lot, like, the refined meat tends to go down that pathway. Then we have the One and the Three, right which you mentioned. And the Three is like the big one that we hit with some of those Omega-6 fats but the healthy kind of Gamma-lenoleic fats – the black currant, the borage oil, right? Is that correct? Is that a good summary?

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. I kind of remember that I’ve looked up at the three pathways, and now I can’t remember which number is which. So you see, but yeah, basically there gonna be balancing inflammation, anti-inflammatory, uhh – building hormones. Just all the good stuff. You know, you need all of them.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: The body needs the total balancing. Heck, some inflammation is good. Some increase in blood pressure is good. But then you need something to balance in like…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: …being able to get the blood pressure back down. So yeah, those, those are really – and fish oil too. You know, fish oil is in as much like in vogue as, you know, when everyone start to take you to, you know, ten years ago or whatever.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: But it’s still valuable, and an– as  also anti-inflammatory…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: …sparks these pathways too.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, I think the fish oil really helps that prostaglandin in Two pathway and kind of dampen it. And then we have the One and the Three which on those paths, and I see Gamma-lenoleic fat like you mentioned. Then it also helped with hormonal acne too. So if you’re female and you have done a lot of good diet changes but you’re still having some skin stopple. Number one always cross off the gut too, right. That’s the really important thing. But if the guts addressed, I see the black currant or the borage oil – those types of oils really help the skin health too.

Bridgit Banner: And the Zinc? Do you guys use Zinc in your practice?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Oh, Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah, that’s– I’m learning more about Zinc, and it’s good for skin health, good for helping you make progesterone. Uh–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: …and it’s in meat and stuff, you know, talking about a Paleo diet but you know, it’s all– we  still could be not getting enough, or not digesting enough, so  uhhmm– you know, how much it take. You know, one of my friends is careful about metals. She’s like don’t take too much Zinc. But, you know, I think, if you’re going through some of these hormonal changes, you could do more, like 30 milligrams Zinc. Uhhmm– you know, really up those fatty acids, and, you know, just see how you respond.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. I think, too, if you’re low in Zinc, you really take a peek at the hydrochloric acid levels. Make sure you’re digesting those healthy meats, ‘cause meats are gonna be the big source. Seafood, meats, I think pumpkin seeds as well are really big in Zinc, as well.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. Linolate in seeds. Ahuh.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And a couple objective ways to even tell how you’re doing with Zinc is, number one, look at your blood test. Look at the alkaline phosphatase marker. If you’re 50 or below, there could be a sign of Zinc deficiency, and then number two is a Zinc Tally Test. I think it’s a Zinc Chloride. I think It’s a Zinc Chloride or salt – one of  the two. Take a shot of that, and if it taste metallic-y that’s the sign that you probably are Zinc-sufficient. If it taste more liquid or neutral, it’s a sign of your being Zinc-deficient. The better it taste means the more you need it. The more metallic-y, the more you kind of being repulsed by it, meaning the less – you say, the more replete you are of it.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. It’s one of the funniest test to get in the clinic…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: … ‘cause like, you know, like, “What am I doing. What am I supposed to be experiencing?” And I’ve also found in my practice that it’s often is best to start in the liquid Zinc to like – once you start to absorb some, then you tend to– let you switch to a pill. I’m not really sure what it is. Is it a digestion issue? I just feel it often works better to start from like a couple of bottles of the liquid. You’re not really getting a high dose, but it seems to like absorb better.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Better. Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: And then you can take Zinc pill.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I totally agree. I think the only thing is to know with Zinc if you’re gonna go really high just make sure there’s a tiny Copper in there just so you don’t throw the Copper too much. You know, ‘cause Zinc and Copper are on the seesaws. So if you go really high in Zinc, they can rob the Copper down. But there’s a lot of people that are worried of Copper toxicity anyway, so if you…

Bridgit Banner: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: …are gonna go above a hundred milligram or so, add a tiny bit of Copper in there.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. Most of us, are– a hundred milligram, yeah, is a lot. And most of us are getting sources of Copper but not enough of Zinc.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I hundred percent agree. So that was tip number one with the really good Omega-6 fatty acids – the healthy Omega-6, not the refined fish oils. What’s number two?

Bridgit Banner: Uh– tip from the whole summit? Hmmmn–.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Just what resonate with you the most? ‘Cause you’re also a clinician. A clinician looks at things a lot differently. You know, you’re looking at things of, “hey what can I do to actually change a clinical outcome of my patients.”

Bridgit Banner: Well, I’ll tell you something we beat up a lot, up on a lot in the summit well– which is wine. You know it’s almost like become a caricature of a middle-aged woman with a glass of wine. You know, wine with the friends, with to come down, and I think it’s, perhaps it’s like, it starts with like a self-medication. It starts like from a busy day, and like it helps me sleep, and then it starts to be real consistent. And, you know, some people listening to your show might be having some couple glasses of wine every night, but they still may be having some more than they need to be. Because they don’t really need it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: So I think, you know, it’s a change we people like don’t wanna make at first but if you say like I, I would say, you know, don’t feel like you have to do it forever. You know, give me a month. Give me a month, and say I’ll do this for a month, and then just see what happens in your body. And, you know, see if you lose weights, see if you’re thinking clear, see if you have more energy in the morning. So yeah I think that those things in midlife that women tend to be like turning towards, that we can turn away from, and have – you know. Those are coping mechanisms, you know. Coping even for a social situations. Like when I’m nervous, I kind’a have that strength, you know. It’s just coping but you know midlife is about expanding, and like becoming more and better, and not just coping. And you know, let’s tune in and like give and tell how to go to bed sooner. You know, all those basics first. Swing then to some more specifics. But you gotta do the basics first, right? You can’t be like. “Oh no, I can’t be this way. I can’t. I’m anxious.” You gotta take that one out. Just try to take out little sweet things, all that blood sugar, you know roller coaster. It’s depleting you of nutrients that you need to make hormones. It’s just making you feel off. And with midlife, and we talk about what the hormones are doing in midlife. There’s just that already a propensity, if we’re not careful, to go a little off and feel a little off. So just wanna create like steadiness in our habits and bodies so that we can weather those changes easier.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. That makes a lot of sense. In Dr. Diana Schwarzbein’s books, she did a book, The Schwarzbein’s Principle, about ten years ago. She’s a – an endocrinologist at the Sta. Barbara, USC Grad, and she talks about women turning towards wine because they’re a natural polyphenols that really help modulate estrogen levels. So as you go into menopause, those ovaries aren’t producing as much hormones, and the adrenals are being relied upon more, right? So the more you swing the blood sugar, the more blood the adrenals get whipped. Anyway, it’s kind of modulating some of those estrogen receptor sites.

Bridgit Banner: Huh– I hadn’t heard about that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I heard people going into the alcohol. 

Bridgit Banner: I hadn’t heard about that. But then there’s also like modulate serotonin which makes us feel good at the moment. You know…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well alcohol’s a sugar, right? It’ll break down the sugar, and sugar will boost up serotonin, dopamine as well. So, I think there’s a lot of different things that are happening there for sure.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Cool. So that’s number two. I think you alluded to with the sugar as well, because when you take sugar, right, you get this hormonal adrenal roller coaster ride – insulin on the high, Cortisol on the low. Meaning when your blood sugar goes up, pancreas produces insulin to push it back down, which then drives more lipogenesis fat creation. But then when the bottom’s __?zow?___, the adrenals have to pick it back up. Adrenaline and Cortisol which then pull from some of your sex hormones. Can you talk more about blood sugar roller coaster with hormones?

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. So, one thing is like for insulin resistance, we cannot, hormone receptors can get blocked up. Uhhmm– so that’s one thing. It definitely can hurt your gut environment, bacterial imbalance, and you need your gut health to clear used estrogens. So even though hormones are coming down, some of the estrogen is often dominant. Progesterone’s falling faster because not every month we ovulate, it’s not very strong. So we need our gut healthy to clear estrogen. I was just doing some research recently and even just like one drink a day can give you SIBO. Uhhmm– yeah, like, there’s, you can’t feed that stuff. You really need to– I get heat up a lot in the summit. And that healthy gut – I’ve kind’a had clients too. You know we just took on and agreed with clients on our coaching program. Man, the stuff we find in our guts are all sorts of things.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: So, it could be hard to make that connection between the gut and hormones, but it’s going on. It’s happening. So, if you can nourish that gut, and not feed it sugars, you know that’s one way to clear. Uh– what else? I mean, I think that most of sugary foods yeah– are devoid of nutrients, and they’re hard on your pancreas, and in your, in your insulin. But they are also hard on your liver, you know, to be processing and dealing with that. And you need your liver healthy to be, you know, doing its job of clearing homrmones and all that stuff, so yeah. Avoiding toxins, when there’s your food being toxic, your body cream, or your perfume, or your, you know carby cleaner. You know, just…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: …really what, cutting down on all that stuff. We kind’a segued on the topic. But that came out a lot too, just like, maybe it’s time that– say, maybe if you think that well this stuff never bothered me before, but now if you’re having hormonal symptoms, it’s time to reassess.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That makes a lot of sense. So hormones are really affected by a lot of these toxins, ‘cause a lot of these toxins are essentially Xenoestrogens, right? ‘Xeno’ means ‘far’ and ‘estrogen’ is an ‘estrogen’ hormone. So if we’re getting impacted by a Xenoestrogen in the environment through pesticides, through chemicals, cleaning products, that can really affect our hormones, can’t it?

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. Very much so, and you know, all stored fat tissue can make extra estrogen too. Or we, you know we make fat tissue as a place to store toxins that our liver can’t handle processing because it’s, you know, so busy handling everything else. So from the connections we did, the toxins and the fat tissue and uhhmm– you know women, say, really our concern about gaining weight at this age as well. So yeah, cleaning up your habits. I mean, nowadays, there’s so many options, and they weren’t all nasty. But there’s not a research in this uhhmm– like clean, you know, clean hands soap without fragrance, then you know, one I mentioned carpet cleaner like. It’s funny sometimes you, where you forgot to look like where you forget to look like. At our, our old house, we had a carpet cleaner, and I just buy like a standard mix that you stick in there. And I realize, “Oh my gosh. What am I doing, like, this is full of chemicals.” I don’t know where in the world will I ever go to get like a natural carpet cleaner soap. And it’s, it was like one mile away – my natural grocery store. So sometimes it’s like you just forget to check certain things, but start checking. You start looking at your labels. Uhhmm– I have this, you know, I’m really hitting homes to eat organic as much as possible. And those little cheat treats, and treaks– excuse me, treats and cheese we do, those are often why we’re getting exposed to the most toxins. Like you know, if you have a little cheat and have something like a cookie, you know that, that we may have been sprayed with glyphosate, and that’s like very toxic to your gut that we talked about. It’s like an anabolic for your gut. So, I, you know, it sounds like a lot of work to be like, “Oh I have to be so clean and pure.” This sounds so horrible, but you know, just do it like it an experiment, and also know like you’re worth it. It’s not like, like, “I have to be healthy, like it’s the worst thing ever.” It’s like you can very much be happy enjoying a healthy lifestyle as you and I do. ‘Cause you have more mental power. You know, it’s like, you’re more comfortable on honestly with yourself. You’re getting a good night sleep when your moods are more balanced. You just like, life can like, be anything that you want when you’re healthy. But when you’re scoping, and having a cookie, and a coffee and whatnot, then you’re standing by. It’s gonna catch up to you too. We have one of our ____ to talked about disease, like cancer. You know, sadly, those are around the corner. You know in our 40’s that could happen. It’s gonna happen sooner but I think like when I was in my 30’s those just sounds like concepts, so far away, but, they’re coming for you. So, midlife is a great time to get better habits ‘cause no one wants to be, you know, in the doctor’s office talking about a heart disease, or could have been cancer. You know what one’s at.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean when you’re dealing with lots of, for me in the patients’ sects. I’m interacting with lots of patients every week. We always talk about getting people to a baseline level of health, because, once people get there, the little bit of cheating that they do at the other side of the fence may throw them out of that performance on for days. The reward you get for here just is not worth the momentary, few minutes, maybe an hour of pleasure, right? So number two is figure out what that thing you want over here – let’s just say it’s alcohol. There’s different versions of alcohol. Not all alcohol are the same, right? I think it’s Dry Crepe Wines, they got a really good wine that’s gonna be low on microtoxin, low on all of the crap and the excipients and also low on the sugar. So if you want wine, they’re healthy versions of wine, healthy versions of alcohol, healthy versions of treats that will give you that mull feel, that pleasure, but not take you out of that performance zone for very long.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah yes, I know. I tried those wines, and they gave me a headache in like three sips. It doesn’t work for me. And it might just be the sugars. I know they say it’s zero sugar, I think that’s what they say with the Dry Crepe Wines, but that wasn’t my experience. So, I…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And for me too, I’m on the same place. I normally get headaches. I typically don’t do wine. I do a sparkling champagne, or I do hard alcohol, Tito’s vodka with kombucha, ginger kombucha. Then I make my own little Moscow mule.  Either that. So, those are my two favorites. So I agree, not a big wine person outside of the Sparkle.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah, yeah, there’s different options. I mean, I recently got my Galitoxin and I have some Candida there. And you know, I don’t have a a word but sometimes, the way I react to sugar and alcohol is a bust since the Candida. Loving it up as  soon as it comes in my mouth. So, kind’a listen to your body too. Uhh– yeah. Don’t just listen to me  and Dr. Justin. Just try stuff, you know, try giving up wine for and if, you know, try getting it back in and see, you know, what your limit is. Like what is – you know, not that I never ever had a drink, but it’s pretty rare, because I just don’t want to hinder the progressions so just a month. But then yeah, everybody’s gonna find their different thing, but I think to clean up and say it’s temporary, it’s something I’m doing for my health to experiment, then you get to be the owner of how much you put it back.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely, men. Tip number two is that don’t drink alcohol on an empty stomach, ‘cause that will, a little bit of fat in there will slow down that absorption so it won’t spike your blood sugar, hit your liver as hard. And then number two, activated charcoal is phenomenal, the kind of buff around those toxic bird too.

Bridgit Banner: I don’t know, like after an evening? Or..

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I typically take it along with it. And then a …

Bridgit Banner: Uhh–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: … a lot of time I’ll take my line, I use a liver supreme which is like milk thistle and some extra B Vitamins. You know so you get some herbs to tonify the liver a bit. And then some extra B vitamins which, you know, your body will burn out to actually help detoxify the alcohol, as well. A lot of alcoholics are deficient in B1.

Bridgit Banner: Hhhn– interesting. I’ll pay that man that say I use charcoal or clay like a fat instantly when I feel bloated. I’ve been telling that all to my clients ‘cause it’s like yeah, we wanna avoid those things that make us feel bloated. But sometimes to we accidentally have them. And then, urrh– so,  those two things really helped me to take in the evening if I’m feeling.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah. Even conventional medicine, I mean, I went to an ER, college roommate, many years back, ___ him on alcohol and at the ER. I mean they had him drinking the whole cup of activated charcoal in liquid form, in the ER.

Bridgit Banner: Oh my God.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So even in the ER, all that stuff.

Bridgit Banner: Interesting.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Interesting.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Crazy, yeah. Back to the female hormone stuff. Tip number three.

Bridgit Banner: Hmmmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: By the way, we got some questions lined up, so once we get through with the…

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. I like it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: …go to a rapid, rapid answer. Kind of  a Q and A.

Bridgit Banner: Okay. Let’s see. Some other things that came up on the summit, say are like, ‘spacing out your eating’ came up. Having a longer time between dinner and breakfast. You know, not snacking, kind of for blood sugar, and also for gut. There’s a certain bacteria, I can’t remember what it’s called. It needs long and regular periods. We built it soft, so having that space with a gut. What else did we talk about? Oh we talked a little bit about Keto and you know, having that high fat diet, not being afraid of fats. The only interesting that came up on that talk was fiber? Uhhmm– and that it can, it’s irritating, so, you know, thinking like you need a ton of salads and vegetables, or grains, or whatever. It’s irritating, you know. But you can eat some rich foods like liver, that actually, oh, oh my God. For some people that I know. But that, that came out of my speaker thing. I’m not always the greatest to remember my tips, like my, like from my – you know, like from my– let  me try to see some of my speakers…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Cool.

Bridgit Banner: … to see the fun things we talked about.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yes. So while you’re doing that, to– yeah, yeah. Let’s head up to some questions. So off the bat, Diana wants to know, do grains, of course, could grain-free, of course – Do grains, I think she’s referring to Gluten-free, do grains, like corn and rice, increase bad estrogens? Why do some people do so well on grains, I don’t?

Bridgit Banner: Hmmmm– That’s a great question. So I think we could say that’s possible that some grains could push that, and you know you should try it on those stuff soon.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Yeah. I would say, I would say off the bat, I would say off the bat, there’s a higher level of Gluten-sensitivity genetically with yourself Diana. That’s gonna create more inflammation, a more leaky gut. That’s number one. The more inflammation that’s going on there that’s gonna take your hormones out of balance because with the more inflamed you are, Cortisol’s gonna increase, Insulin maybe out of balance, that may skew your progesterone to estrogen ratio, ‘cause you’ll pull progesterone downstream to anti-inflammatory Cortisol so that can create more estrogen dominance. Also, a lot of grains are gonna be contaminated with microtoxins and can increase LPS in the gut. And the more lipopolysaccharide that’s there as well that can potentially increase beta-glucuronidase, which is an enzyme that deconjugates metabolized estrogen and puts it back in the circulation. So the more inflammatory foods, the more foods that feed this biosis, where bad bacteria increases beta-glucuronidase which can unconjugate–deconjugate. So conjugation is nothing more than a hormone with a straightjacket around it that’s typically a protein. And that beta-glucuronidase opens it up and allows it back in the circulation which can affect your hormones so for sure.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. That’s probably a lot more detailed than what I’d say. I would say, you did a good– you potentially irritate your gut and create some inflammation. I even wonder if some of them could like we talked about those prostaglandin pathways earlier. I wonder if some of them could push some of those more inflammatory pathways. And then I think like with stress, chronic stress, you know, your gut lining can be thinner, and not as robust, and then things are more irritating too. And then the quantities that’s really easy to overeat – grains, uhhmm– and then carbs, and then that sugar, and like, you know, the fat tissue produces more estrogen, the inflammation is blocking the receptors.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: I think that for women, life is really finding ratio in their diets. Like, what is like, enough carbs and oils, if you know, what is like a serving size, or, you know, how many drinks is like, you know, that pushes me over, well kind of bloated. You know, it might not clear in my head anymore. So I think finding that ratio is really important. And still while women are having a protein, and a protein in the morning, you start– you brought this in your talk. Uhhmm– yeah, just getting like those whole animal, like cooking the whole chicken, getting a lot, like robust, you know, variety of fats. Uhhmm– anything is okay to have some like we talked about the nuts, seeds oils to, to do some seeds cycling. Uhh– we have like, a blog people can find to do some seed cycling challenge. People really went  with that. Probably the fiber, probably the oils on those nuts and seeds can be helpful.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. Totally. Next stop here is there relationship, is there a relationship with cholesterol, high cholesterol and menopause?

Bridgit Banner: Yeah? So we, I kind’a heard two things, I would say two things. One is that we need cholesterol to make hormones, so sometimes it’s rising up like naturally to produce more hormones in this time. Uhhmm– but then our keynote speaker would say, you know, if you’re not eating, consuming enough cholesterol, your body will be forced to make more cholesterol. So we wanna to kind of avoid that by giving our body that cholesterols. Uhhmm – say the question again. Was it the correlation…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, so there’s a connection – the relationship between menopause occurring and higher cholesterol.

Bridgit Banner: I think there is an occurrence with it. But I think it’s, if you feel your cholesterol is out of range and those speeches are like debatable. But, you know, our speaker on Heart Health said, you know, that the quickest way to heart disease is through sugar. So it’s more like, body’s getting inflamed from the sugar, and then cholesterol is kind of increasing to repair it. So, I think to some extent, cholesterol could go up at this age naturally? But if it’s like sky high and your diet is very poor, full of sugars, it could be something to look at.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I agree. I mean if you, if your diet isn’t quite in check in insulin resistance going on, that will get worse over time, and insulin does drive that hemometagluteracoreboductase enzyme that stimulates cholesterol synthesis. We can’t forget that majority of cholesterols may be by your liver. Typically, insulin sort of drive it. Poor diet doesn’t have insulin to check. That’s one vector. A second vector that could be a subclinical thyroid issue, and low thyroid function will cost cholesterol…

Bridgit Banner: That’s true.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: …to go up.

Bridgit Banner: It’s a good point. Yeah. This is uhhmm – I would. The most common time to be diagnosed is menopausal. But second to that is perimenopausal, post-partum, uhh– I think puberty is in there. I don’t, I don’t work for that age group as much but, yeah all, every time the hormones’ changing, the estrogen can be dominant, think about after you have a PB, estrogen is very high ‘cause you’re not cycling. It’s not as high as, you know, the other times, but there’s an imbalance. There’s other things we could talk about too, but uhhmm– when the estrogen is like affecting, estrogen being high and relative to progesterone is affecting your immune system, and that could be autoimmune thyroid or that could be just an estrogen dominant thyroid condition. So that was a great point Justin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. I think uhh– the last piece to that puzzle is, “Does it even matter if you’re cholesterol’s high?” So, my criteria is, number one, if you’re cholesterol’s over 300, maybe we got to take a look at it. Number two is, “Do we have elevations in inflammatory markers, CRP, homocysteine, fiber antigen?” Okay. If those are high, maybe we got to take a look at it. Number three is how’s your– HTL, the total cholesterol ratio? “Is it greater than five?” If it’s greater than five, maybe we got to look at it. And then the last but not the least, is “How’d you rate the HTL ratio?” If it’s two or below, then it’s probably okay. So it’s not, cholesterol has never cut a dry number. You got to look at, I see a lot of people high in cholesterol, also at kickass HTL. So then their HTL, the total cholesterol ratio is really rock solid.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. Yeah. Oh I hope that helps the…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, next is uhm – 47-year old Strakito, four years overtrained, undernourished and 40 pounds overweight. She is yeast-overgrowth, thyroid are low, all sex hormones are low, blood sugar is rising, what should she address first? Oh, she wants to address the gut first, your thoughts? This is our practitioner MP, the practitioner that wants to address the gut first.

Bridgit Banner: She’s asking if that’s the best choice, or…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yes, that’s the best.

Bridgit Banner: …what kind of thing. 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I have my opinion but I want you to go first.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. You know, we talked about this someone on the summit. And a few people said, we’ll see what you think Justin? I can’t remember what you said, so.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Some people say they work on the hormones exist to give a little relief and a little more energy. Uhh– and then they start doing some of the painful works. So just first the gut and the liver detox, then where some symptoms are gonna come up. Uhh – does it have to be that, I think what we do in our practice. I mean we’re, we’re a little bit all mixed together.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Uhhm – but, you know, I wanna say you wanna go after the gut in a really intense way ‘til your body is enough, strong enough like to handle it. So those detox pathways are clear. Sometimes you start with some gentle detox, and get the foundations going. Uhhmm – like I, I mentioned briefly like saying you know if I said this in the first time we’re in maybe. So, anyway  this time last year, I was having a lot of trouble with spotting, and I was also  exposed to toxic molds. I was like, I don’t really know if I’ll get my hormones right ‘til I get the molds right. I have gotten better with the mold, but I feel that you still can’t actually caught pass some of those things and address the hormones with like what I mentioned before, like the hemp oil, and the flax oil, and the fish oil. We knew, so yeah. I think you can kind of massage some of them, sometimes. ‘Cause clearing the gut takes a while. So we get some loving in there. What are your thoughts?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, so. When I hear that though, when I hear addressing the gut, there’s kind of a, a double lifestyle. So when I address the gut, there’s six R’s that we go through. Number one is removing the bad foods, right? That’s totally okay. We can check that one. And to yeah, two, replacing enzymes and acids better. That’s number two. Check. Yes, we can do that. Number three is replacing, or I should say repairing the gut lining. Nutrients that help with the gut lining repair and helping you deal with the inflammation in the gut, and helping you repair the adrenals, the thyroid, and some hormonal issues first. So those are the first three R’s – remove, replace, repair. Okay? So that we can do those first. Now I think when people talk about addressing gut, they tend to the fourth R, which is removing the infection of this biosis. Whatever the critters are. So I always wait, at least one month or two for that. If detox isn’t good, and hormones aren’t good, and blood sugar and immunes not good, that can really create a lot more stress that your body may not have the ability to deal with. You only have one or two months with the patient for them to start seeing something. And if they start moving backwards for one or two months, you’re gonna lose them. You’re not gonna be able to help the clinician. That’s just my personal take based on

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. And I like, this is all individual to every person, and yeah. You have to kind of start most obvious things, and I don’t know who the name of this– you know, just resting. You know, just resting your body and have some great talks and like mindset and emotional health. Just uhhmm – all are part of health too. You know, you overdid it and you’re reassessing like the direction of your health, the direction of your life. Like, ijust resting, just reading books like lying on the sun, going a vacation. These things are very healing as well. So uhhmm – yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Bridgit Banner: Just remember to keep that to your protocols.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And that parasympathetic nervous system going, I think, that has to be part of any functional medicine programmed at the foundational level is to sleep, the good healthy habits, the time to relax, so yeah. That’s a really good point and we don’t want to overlook that.

Bridgit Banner: Huh.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Can detoxifying the liver bring your hormone balance back?

Bridgit Banner: That’s an easy one. And do a lot for– yes. Yeah.  Yeah. Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I agree. I think, I think as long as your hormones are decent, like you have good institution in the gland, I think that may be enough. But if there’s a lot of dysfunction in the adrenals of the thyroid, that will help with the support of the other side as well. So I think, it totally can for sure though.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah, yes. Some part of the system that a few people mentioned on the summit, and yeah. It’s not the only piece. Nothing ever is. Just one piece. Yeah but it’s actually like what you said just removing all the toxins is important too. Like before you go into taking in the herbs, doing a coffee in the morning. Just make sure you got them out of your diet and out of your home, out of your water supply to just reduce that part.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I think, you already – we don’t, our body will detoxify better just by not putting toxins in.  When we think of detoxifying, we’re giving something to help detoxify. But we can also just think about it. let’s just not add stuff as well. And then you mentioned earlier with the fatty liver, that the one of the major stressors on your liver is excess carbohydrates and insulin, because that will cause a fatty liver, which will slow down the filtration too.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. Which is even gross to think about the cause …

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I know.

Bridgit Banner: … of your liver blocking, if everything.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know. Absolutely. Next, estrogen dominant is related to histamine. HIT is related to methylase, to histamine as well. After addressing diet in gut’s health, bateria, parasites and yeast. We still have ED plus HIT. So, well ED means Estrogen Dominance, HIT means Histamine Intolerance. Then what can we do besides working on methylation?

Bridgit Banner: I’m trying to make sure I got all of that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It’s a little confusing with the abbreviation, but I think what they’re saying is, “Hey. I have Estrogen Dominance and I have a Histamine issue. I’ve already worked on the gut. What else can I do besides pushing my detox methylation pathways?” That’s my translation.

Bridgit Banner: Hmmm– I think you can think about hormone production. So I think you can think about what we talked about before – the fats and oils, to get. Depending on your age like, I would do more like Vitex, for like a little younger, early 40’s, but anytime in the 40’s, 50’s, doing like Maca estrogenic herbs.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: If you can pull everything up, you know, pull the progesterone up, it will help balance that the estrogen. So, uhhmm – I think that’s an important piece that sometimes gets missed ‘cause our American, like, culture is always thinking about clearing and detoxing. But I don’t know if this person’s, have their hormones tests. But most of these are also depleted, at this age. So just like pulling hormone production up, you could see that estrogen become balanced.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yep. I totally agree with you. One thing I’ll say, I think you already said it all. Potentially, adding some progesterone, maybe even some pregnenolone, DHEA. But looking at the adrenals too is an important piece.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. You can introduce some things like macon, borage oil. Super easy on your own. Yeah but with a practitioner, you could do some simple progesterone. Uhhmm– also I get some testing for that kind of– I do well on progesterone; I don’t do so well on DHEA, pregnenolone. For my experience, everybody’s kind of different.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And that, I see that too with people that kind of more backed up liver pathways too.

Bridgit Banner: Oh yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And maybe the mold. Look, ‘cause you mentioned your mold experience. Maybe that was the driving factor with that.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. Back when I tried those, I was living with mold but didn’t know. So, it’s kind of, kind of flavored my whole history like, “Oh.” So, it’s interesting. And I think, you know, we haven’t talked about that. You know, there can be these hidden things. You talked about parasites…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: But you know, I have to learn a lot about mold, and Epstein-Barr Virus, and uhh– all these things I was posting I didn’t know that. Those things really flare up with the changing hormones, not getting a good night sleep. And we talk a little bit about how that high estrogen can affect the immune system, in not a favorable way. And then, just with aging, the immune system can be deteriorating in a sense. So uhhmm – so, yeah, a lot, things can come up. You know if you feel like you’ve tried everything and you’re still sick, my personal lesson is, like, there’s probably something else going on to look for.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. That makes sense. What do you think about supplementing with DIM Postmenopause?

Bridgit Banner: I mean I think it could be done. I guess it could clear some bad estrogen sort of thing. Is that what the person’s thinking?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean. I’m kind of little perplexed as well. Maybe the detox pathways are running and they kind of support delivering such. But most people will have lower estrogens, especially if they’re, you know, not adding in a whole bunch of, you know, estrogen as well. So, definitely makes more sense with the cycle of female, right?

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. It’s, again, on issue. Uhhmm – I think DIM is great for like, PCOS. It’s used a lot, you know, in some Estrogen Dominance cases. Also that CDG, I’ve known about just in the last year; that can help. Uhhmm – yeah , I’ve– in my own body has been more effective to build more hormone. And they did not be in everyone’s case. Maybe that’s just mine. And you can get tested. We have one. Maria Claps talks about the importance of testing at any age. And occasionally many women will be older but still have high estrogen, and that’s something to figure out and learn about. Let’s just see what pathways to – I think you run a DUTCH test too just to– see– like I was just curious about this caller like, what are her symptoms, does she feel – has high estrogen, and she’s worried about cancer in her family, or something like that. Yeah, I would say yeah, maybe but I want more information, or maybe they’ll be good to first person that ask.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think you’re right. I think getting the test on, I think getting the more information on what the symptoms are that made them think they need it would really be the key.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Next is…

Bridgit Banner: Question.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Love it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah we’re hitting it. Next is, without getting an organic acid test, is there a kind of a universal protocol supplement that can be taken for hormonal balance. What do you take personally?

Bridgit Banner: Well, I keep saying the same stuff over and over so, more, for me like, for me, definitely the oils. I love magnesium. I love, I love it for this age group. I love it in my own body, I used magnesium chelate. I, I like adore it, even when I’m just getting cramps. This stuff like helps me to prevent like menstrual migraine, menstrual cramps, uhhmm– you know. I take a good quality multivitamin that has, that has the Zinc, that has methylated B vitamins. And I’ll tell you a funny story. I got my hair analyzed like this sooner and I got the results back before but I got to read them. And like in my novice opinion, “Oh magnesium, it’s so high, I better like. Stop taki– a few things looked high.” So I stopped taking everything. I stopped taking. Oh, my gosh, my cycle. So much for stamina. It really made me see, like, getting a good quality source of B vitamins, B vitamins is very important to spark a bunch of things with ovulation hormones. Getting that is important. Taking the extra high dose. I mangled magnesium. Most women need like 600 to 800 milligrams and get in good form. I just have a new client and she’s been taking magnesium for years. I can’t remember the form she’s been taking but…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: …oxide–

Bridgit Banner: Yeah something that she’s– I think it was oxide, she’s not getting anything out of it. So I just like said switch to magnesium. I love magnesium. I love fish oil, I mentioned. You don’t need a lot but a little bit. Uhhmm – a little bit of borage oil, or hemp oil. Uhhmm– you know, I eat a lot of nuts and seeds in my diet too, and I think they helped me from hormones.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Uhhmm– what are the thing– we talked about Zinc, that if you’re not getting much Zinc it might be something you want to up the supplementation on…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yep.

Bridgit Banner: …what other supplements do you like Justin?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I think, you already said the foundational things that aren’t even related to female hormones which I think gives people overlooked at, right? So that, what you said is totally foundation. Then add on top of that chase through your Vitex, that would be great for almost any female, especially for your cycling. If you’re more menopausal, you can go more on the specific pheno types of Maca. It’s a great product that I used and carry in my store called Femmenessence. And they have a great type of Maca for cycling females, and a great type of Maca for menopausal females, and it works phenomenal for a lot of cycling issues, and also about a lot of the Hot Flashes. ‘Cause remember Hot Flashes especially if they happen at night. They screw up women’s sleep. If their sleep’s screwed up, and their blood sugar’s screwed up, that throws everything off. So I like the Maca and the Chaste tree, you know. What’s going on.

Bridgit Banner: Yeah. You know, I, I have some. You know, I’ve used sleep aids, or like anxiety aids, you know, like now, on the summit, a lot. And I think it’s okay to this, at this age group. Like, don’t just like try to bear it, you know. If, you need to sleep, so you take some 5-HTP. I want a trick I’ve learned from my elevated practitioners, like, do some more almond milk and a half teaspoon of nutmeg. You know, that’s really calming at night. Uhhmm– what else do I take? You know I have, like, an herbal one – like valerian, stuff like that, which is calming. I have a whole bunch of things around to eat just depending on the day. Uhh – so, and that doesn’t exactly sound like it’s about hormones, but it kind’a is ‘cause you need that good night sleep to, like, get your hormones stabilized.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Huge. What do you eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner, Bridgit?

Bridgit Banner: Oh, I love it. So this morning I have a cheap pudding and uhhmm – I have it on with some chocolate flakes, walnuts…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice.

Bridgit Banner: … glazed and on top some fresh fruit. So, uhh – I’m a little allergic to eggs so I don’t, you know, that makes – you know the word. ‘Cause I do a sausage, like, like a little frozen organic sausage uhhmm– Sometimes I have, occasionally I have, like, a soup for breakfast, like a – This can be super easy. You keep a box of broth in your fridge and like a teem of Kewas, some greens. Sometimes I have that. What else? I’m giving you breakfast ideas ‘cause I think it’s a hard one for folks. I do smoothie sometimes. Sometimes I help people do some trail mix. I do hard boiled eggs, so get some protein. I really avoid carbs in the morning. That’s very important to me. But I do have carbs usually on lunch and dinner.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yep.

Bridgit Banner: For lunch, I sometimes have leftovers. I love working from home because I can have, I can turn things together, like some leftover rice, you know, fry some vegetables. Try to have like some chicken sausage, which I had laying around. Uhhmm – I definitely just kind of put stuff together, for pretty healthy lunch, uhhmm – which, yeah – I love that option. For dinner, you know, we usually have something like a piece of fish, or chicken, uhhmm – you know, often an animal protein, and then uhhmm – some green stuff, you know, a steamed broccoli or, I’m,  I’m putting a lot of fat and everything, so my steamed broccoli’s gonna have hemp oil all over it. I put hemp oil yeah, hemp oil, hemp oil on my lunch. I put hemp oil, you know. I put hemp oils everywhere, nuts everywhere, lots and lots of seeds. Uhhmm – and then maybe we have like sweet potato fries. So, we do some potato, some rice or Keema are pretty much the carbs that I would eat.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Bridgit Banner: Uhhmm – what else? Yeah. That’s kind of the theme.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent. I think you’re rock solid. Two other questions; we’ll hit them rapid fire. Does it matter for Dacogens be in pill form or powder form? It depends. Certain female hormone issues or tonics, I do find sometimes giving the liquid. Tincture-based herbs can make them a little more potent.

Bridgit Banner: Hmmm–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: …a take on that? Do you agree or no?

Bridgit Banner: I would, yeah. That’s like a great question. I mean, I think the tinctures feel strong, but if you’ll take out a small sip of oil. If you take – I bought all this like powdered Maca and stuff to make these elixir drinks. I don’t like them. I don’t like to, you know, the powder in them. So, it takes some things… but I do have a Maca powder, I make them to smoothies. Effectiveness, efficacy, I’m not totally sure if, you know, I have to research that. But I do think it’s important to take what you’re gonna take. Have a variety. Like, I’m willing to take pills, ‘cause I’m pretty okay with it. But it’s nice to also have some things that are liquid. Some things that you can rub on, like, I feel, especially with my mold. I really learned, like, it’s. Uhhh– It  can get exhausting and so expensive to take so many supplements. And if there’s something you can do that’s in another form, I’m really holding on to that a lot sider lately. So I would just tell the colors rise efficacy maybe on home ingredients but I like things in all sorts of forms, and I think it’s good to experiment.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, I think it’s totally good to individualize. Last question, Cortisol is normal except spikes at a very high at around three(3) to five(5) PM. So this person wants to know, is that Adrenal Fatigue stage 2? Again, I think we did the whole test to see it, to know where the Cortisol levels are at. Stage 2 is typically, relatively, normal Cortisol levels, with aberrations and rhythm, and lower DHEA in general. So I think we’re missing some info. Any comments?

Bridgit Banner: You know, the thing that came to me, and I’m not an elevated practitioner. But is it, is it vital that wind one. That’s, that, that imbalance is in the afternoon, and that’s the time I feel imbalanced too. And a lot of people have this wind imbalance ‘cause we’re so busy nowadays, doing so much stuff. Uhhmm– so that’s like a really key time of the day for me to rest. And that can be tough ‘cause it’s like the end of your day, when you’re gonna pick up your kids. But I would just personally tune in to like how that time of day feels for them, and like what are they doing, what and where the stimulants were like, you know, just, are they eating snack always right before that spike, or in a certain stress trigger, or maybe the body’s just trying to like pick them up. ___?Slob?__ but not sure. I think it’s interesting there with three to five.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I think potentially like a blood sugar drop, had their lunch around 11 or 12, maybe their blood sugar’s dropping so maybe they need a mini meal, maybe scheduled a meditation in there, maybe keeps an adaption …

Bridgit Banner: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: …kind of in your system during that time of the day; a couple of options.

Bridgit Banner: I have to eat at that time of the day. Like, it’s not optional for me, and the more I eat, the better. I mean maybe I should have my dinner there. Uhh – you know maybe someday I’ll also tea in that earlier dinner. But I, if I can really heavy snack. Yeah, my butcher, just dropping items, snacks constantly. One,  probably the one snack a day that’s not optional for me.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. Perfect. Very good. Well again, closing up here. We got the Hormone Balance After 40 Summit. We’ll put information below in the YouTube description and the podcast description, so make sure you check out that summit. Forty (40), or thirty (30) years old, great people are gonna be there. I’m gonna be there in one of first days, so make sure you tune in to see me.

Bridgit Banner: Day one.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Day one.

Bridgit Banner: …this guy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it, love it. Very cool. Any other comments or concern, anything else you want to address to the listeners or…

Bridgit Banner: No. I think that’s– it was a lot of fun. You know, I’m not always this, like, on my toes but it’s good for me. Just tried, tried to hang with it. There were really good questions. Then it was always fine with you Dr. Justin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Thank you. What’s that summit URL link again?

Bridgit Banner: after40summit and it’s a number 40.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: After forty, the number 40? Summit S-U-M-M-I-T? One ‘t’?

Bridgit Banner: Yes. Two m’s, one ‘t’. It should come up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Perfect. Love it. Bridgit.

Bridgit Banner: Bye everyone.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well, thank you so much for the great information. You have a great day.

Bridgit Banner: You too.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Thank you.

 

References:

http://after40summit.com/

The “Schwarzbein’s” Principle by Dr. Diana Schwarzbein

Dr. Ben House – Enhancing testosterone and improving your health- Podcast #130

Dr. Justin Marchegiani welcomes his special guest Dr. Ben House, a functional medicine doctor based in Costa Rica who also works with a lot of athletes. Join them as they engage in a very stimulating discussion about boosting up performance athletically as they focus on the role of testosterone in the male body.

Gain valuable insight about the recent researches related to Dr. Ben’s area of expertise. Know about the different tests, markers and treatment approach that he uses to address his patients. Get to apply some valuable information related to effective movement patterns that might be related to your health and body goals.

In this episode, we cover:

2:35   Nutrition Recommendation

9:40   Overtraining and Cortisol: Testosterone Ratio

13:33   Functional Medicine Tests for Athletes

18:37   Steroid and Insulin Use

33:30   Movement Patterns

42:40   Blood Markers and Patterns in Athletes

 
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Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hey, there! It’s Dr. Justin Marchegiani. Today we have Dr. House in the house. Dr. Ben, how are we doing today, man?

Dr. Ben House: I’m doing great. How are you?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent. We got you on Skype, too. So anyone listening to the MP3, feel free and click below and check out the YouTube channel as well. And Dr. House is over at functionalmedicinecostarica.com

Dr. Ben House: Yeah, that—that’s me. That’s where I’m at.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And you’re seeing patients virtually, as well, which is great. So if you feel like you jive at Dr. Ben, feel free head over there and reach out to him. Dr. Ben is also a PhD grad over at UT. Hook ‘em horns, baby. I’m in Austin now, too. So I’ve given up my Boston College UMass. I’m a modern now. And UT Longhorns, baby. So, congrats on that. Excited to chat.

Dr. Ben House: Yes. I miss Austin. It’s an amazing city for sure.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It is. And I know you used to work with a lot of athletes. Were you working with the UTF-8 as well? And the football players and such?

Dr. Ben House: Uh – I worked on a time, right, in basketball.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Basketball.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm – Yeah, yeah. So now he’s in the Philadelphia 76ers. So I consult with couple of proteins but uhmm—it’s—yeah, I primarily work with males and athletes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So tell me a little more about that. Like what are some of the low hanging fruits mean? Maybe we don’t have a lot of professional athletes listening here today. But what are some of the low hanging fruits are, you know, average people are listening can take and apply to themselves to make them better athletically?

Dr. Ben House: I think a lot of times we put professional athletes on the pedestal.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But most of the time, professional athletes are—uhm—they’re successful in spite of what they do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Because of what they do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. So it’s probably not best to look at what they’re doing. Uh—uh there’s obviously exemptions to every rule. There are really some teams that are really pushing the envelope as far as nutrition. But you gotta think in the pro circumstance, there’s not a ton of motivation and drive to get guys healthy if it doesn’t get them performing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm—so kinda sell there is—is Dr. Bob is really good about this—it’s you’re selling longevity.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Coz can you—after someone’s thirty, can you give him 10 years in the league, right? And that’s—that’s pretty important. And so, if we take this to the weekend warriors,  someone who’s—who just loves to train like me. I’m not a professional athlete.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I played college football, but after that, the dream was dead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm—And so it’s—it’s we really gotta—I think the low hanging fruit is the fundamentals—the things that we always talk about. Coz most athletes—they—they don’t—they overtrain because they’re under recovered.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Totally. Now on the diet side, that’s probably a foundation. I think you’ll agree with this. On the diet side, are you kinda following the paleo template? What is the food quality? What does the macros look like with an athlete like that?

Dr. Ben House: So when I lecture on or talk about nutrition, I always talk about three things. So we have quality is the first thing for me. Quality is super important. Uh—we have quality in there, we have timing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: Those are kind of—For me those are in the order of importance. Uhm—but we have to be really careful. Like Michael Phelps.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Who probably eats 68,000 calories a day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You obviously can’t eat brussel sprouts and sweet potatoes and get it done. Uhm—so when you have—when you have some who’s just training 20 hours a week, your quality has to drop. And you have to make sure your adjustment’s on point as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: Coz otherwise you gotta just stop, put the car in the garage, and really kinda figure it out. And so it’s—we’re at a really cool point where I think we have some technology coming out where we can just individualize.

Dr. Ben House: So all these—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: –hypothetical, best way shit can just go away.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. So we got the basically, high-quality proteins, high-quality fats. They’re probably—maybe these guys are gonna be higher on the macronutrients with the carbs and such, correct?

Dr. Ben House: That all depends – So carb work—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And in sport maybe.

Dr. Ben House: The carb world is really—there’s—I think of carbs as n__

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: And so if—if you want somebody to go fast, you need carbs and glycogen assistance. And so you can’t—you can’t feed high-intensity exercise on fat. It’s—it’s—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: We know that if your fat adapted, you’re actually—you’re actually metabolically inflexible so that you can’t burn carbohydrates at those—at those faster intensities. Uhmm—so for me, it’s all about what is athlete doing. What if they’re, you know, 40 year old, strength athlete and they’re 20 pounds overweight, uhmm—I’m gonna stay at the 5 rep range. Probably knock down carbs pretty well. If—are they a 20 year old athlete who’d never had any problem with weight, and I got their blood sugar, all looks fine, I’m gonna—how many carbs do you take, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. Okay. Alright, got it. So we have kinda the macronutrients, we’re obviously cutting out—organics gonna be obviously dialled in, right? Food quality’s gonna be dialled in. We’re eating enough calories—that’s big. We’re mak—making sure the in the HCl and the enzymes are up to snuff so we can actually break down and digest those foods. We’re making sure we’re drinking, we’re sleeping maybe 8-10 hours. That could be big thing as well. Uh—more exercise, more muscle breakdown requires more recovery. I think with Steve Nash and Tom Brady, too. I mean they get like 10 hours sleep a night. I think that’s the biggest thing. Huge.

Dr. Ben House: Number one. Like if you wanna increase performance, like this is out of  Stanford, like sleep more. Spend more time in bed.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. You get to bed between 10 PM and 2 AM and you’re asleep during the cycle. You’re getting access to maybe $3,000 to $5000 of growth hormone a month just by getting in bed during those timeframes. Would you agree?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And I mean, testosterone is also secreted. GNRH works in that—inside that time block, too. So it’s—the circadian rhythm hormone. So you start jacking up your circadian rhythm. And a lot of the—one of the probably because athletes we see, they’re just hooked up on cell phones all the time like this is perpetual, you know, Twitter, Facebook, social media feed. Man, that’s—that’s a whole lot of bull S.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. So you get the nutrients, you get the digestion, you get the right amount of exercising. That’s a really key thing coz a lot of times it’s train, not drain. And you see a lot of overtraining with your athletes?

Dr. Ben House: Well, I think we have to be mis—I come from a strength coach background. So in the college setting, the strength coaches it—it’s unfortunate. And you even saw it at the  University of Oregon.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: When they got rid of radicals who was like, “who’s the man?” Uhm – and I bump into this other guy and he started smoking people and he put three guys in the hospital. Uhm—so the saying with this coach is pri—it’s sometimes they’re thought of as the punishers. So they have to dole out like someone doesn’t show at the practice. And so, if you’re in a team sport atmosphere, like—you don’t have that much control over the overall, though. There’s some people that are using like Zephyr or some really cool GPS program to over—to like measure overall look.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—but some of that is outside of your control.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: The cool thing—in the general population and if you have—while like private is because you can have total control over the athlete.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And—one of my favourite examples is Rutherford who like—he was like the 200 best in the world. Uhmm—and now, when he—he was training like typical like four days a week. And they brought him to like one-two hard training sessions every 10 days, and he won the gold medal. Alright. So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Dr. Ben House: So it’s kinda—it’s like everybody is individual and so if you can individualize that protocol and—and volume’s a hammer, right? And so that’s not the thing sometimes that we wanna use all the time.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Right. That totally makes sense. So when you’re exercising these guys, are the movement patterns gonna be standard for each person like the functional ones like squats, deadlifts, lunges, step up, like core pushing and pulling movements. How do you adjust those and tweak those with the sports with the athletes?

Dr. Ben House: I—So that’s gonna be all dependent on the sport, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And the position that they play. Uhm—so if you got a baseball player, like it’s all rotary power, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: It’s probably getting them—getting them at the right side of the right handed. Getting them kinda even and obviously not getting injured. from up your eyes standpoint.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so—it, it’s so rare but I think for that, it’s also gonna depend. Like is strength, is arm strength really doesn’t apply unless like you’re a full-back or a line man. Uh—sometimes the best guys in the weight room are the worst kind in the field. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: It’s uh—we have crossfit now. I think that’s kinda—that—it’s really cool. And now the weight room is the sport.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And so weekend—it’s open right now—we can do crossfit as much as we want. But I think it just produced some people that can take insane amounts of volume. Uhm—and not everybody can. And they get—It’s very Spartan type society.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, totally. Now when you’re working out with someone, is there a certain heart rate that you want people to get back down to? Maybe with your adrenal dysfunctional patient, is there a certain heart rate you want to get back down to before they go into the next set?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—I’m kinda __heart rate isn’t our best.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: It’s an okay marker.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: I—there’s a new technology that we’re using called mock C—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Which is essentially muscle oxygenation. So we wanna see that muscle is just resaturated with oxygen (O2).

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And it’s get—it’s probably not a horrible for just the average person right now.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But it will get more affordable, uhm—it will get more usable. Right now, it’s not that user-friendly. Uhm—I think you probably want to get back to a good resting heart rate. Also the—the research is pretty clear cut if you’re chasing hypertrophy. Uhmm—that 2-3 minute window for rest is probably where you wanna be.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 2-3 minutes. Got it. And are you looking at free cortisol to uhmm—I’m sorry, free testosterone to cortisol ratio to assess overtraining in any of your athletes?

Dr. Ben House: So I look at total testosterone. I don’t put a lot—this is my personal opinion—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I’ve done a lot of research on salivary panels and I don’t like cortisol panels coz they’re just like—their—they’ve done 30 days of salivary test and they’re super variables especially in athletes. Uhh—so I don’t—If I could get a week of them, I would use them. But if I could only get one day, I don’t wanna just—I don’t wanna live and die by that one day. Uhmm—so, and I—you can ask questions. Like you know, probably the best indicator of overtraining is like hey, how you’re performing. Like how do you feel, how’s your mood like. So a lot of times, we can get a lot of information just by asking questions.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. And what’s your total cortisol cut-off? Your total testosterone cut-off be like? Is it 100 above?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I mean the research is—I don’t really get, I don’t like the whole bench press number of testosterone.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: I think it’s only looking at production. We don’t know the sensitivity and the receptor. We—we can get such binding globulin and the albumin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: We can get free testosterone but I mean the ment—the mental strain of that for guys like, “Hey you’re inadequate, you have a testosterone of 5.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I don’t like to do that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Do you see correlations, though? Do you see like, “Hey, these are the althletes that are responding the best, that are recovering the best or getting the best results” Here is where his numbers at. Do you see any correlation there?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think—we can’t really make that correlation—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: inside of physiological ranges. Uh—we don’t have a lot of data on that as far as research. Anything I would say would be anecdotal there. Uhmm—do I think, do I have a hunch that it’s better to be at 800 than 380?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Yeah. Totally.

Dr. Ben House: Do I know that 800 is better than 600 or 500? I don’t know. I haven’t seen that. I’ve seen—I’ve seen some beast that are in the 500 range like 10% body fat, like 210—like they’re front squatting 400 pounds. Like, so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Testosterone can be really variable. I think it peaks more in the AM right? And they can drop down in the afternoon. It can be the variables. So you may just catch it at the wrong window.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And in some circadian rhythms are screwed up like you have no idea where you’re measuring. So, like it’s—it’s to me—it’s the lab value is not the person so I always wanna like, “Who is this person?”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Yeah. You gotta look at the clinical outcome along with the—the objective values. Totally makes sense. Are you doing any adrenal testing with your regular functional medicine patients?

Dr. Ben House: I don’t do a lot of adrenal testing. Uh—you interviewed Wakowski here, kinda one of my favourite sayings, like 99% of new-age primates are cortisol resisting or have cortisol dysregulation so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: To me it’s like why do I want to measure chaos? I’m a big fan of not measuring chaos. Uhmm—and that—that’s just my viewpoint. So I would be apt to use like—I would use it later.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: So if you’re sleeping, if you’re doing all the things that you need to do, then I’ll run that—if we’re still not getting what we need to do. But the other way you can kinda frame it, too, is well, if I put this—I try to make it as least financially kind of—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. You’re trying to make it that the buying financially is low as possible so you can help more people, right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah. But for the testing standpoint, so—if—if someone—if I don’t—if they don’t care about money, I’m gonna get this test coz then if I show them, right? Then they’re gonna have it buying.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Exactly.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And lever is gonna be higher. Okay, your free testos—you’re free cortisol’s jacked. You have no DHEA. You start to do the shit that you need to do, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly.

Dr. Ben House: Uh but if I can get that from other means, If I can them dialled in the fundamentals, then—and doing all the things that they need to do—coz nobody in the general population’s doing that. I mean slow—today is low.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly. So looking like at the palette of test, functional medicine test that you’re using with your patient, with your athletes, what are those top tests?

Dr. Ben House: Uh, so I – my top 2 are definitely a comprehensive blood panel

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it.

Dr. Ben House: And then CSA. Like uhmm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Stool analysis.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And if someone doesn’t—if that doesn’t pop, maybe I’ll go grab a SIBO breath test or something like that if they have—if they’re carbon tolerant—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But we gotta immediately fix the digestive component. And obviously you don’t fix that without fixing the cortisol component. But uhmm—that’s my—that’s what I do. And then I’ll run precision analytics sometimes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup. Okay. So you will do one of the—the drug urine testing for the adrenal rhythm sometimes.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. Good. I do those tests as well and their good.

Dr. Ben House: I want to see uh—so a lot of functional med—I think we can get in trouble coz I’m a PhD so I’m very research oriented.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So if a test doesn’t have a ton of research behind it, I—I’m not very apt to use it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: And that can be good and bad. Uhm—but I think like 5 years down the road, like is that lab gonna run like duplicates for 30 days? Are they gonna—are they gonna just do everything in their power to validate that measurement? Or are they just gonna this is it. This works? Then that’s—that’s what I wanna see.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. That totally makes sense. And Biohouse got a new one out, called the CARS, the adaptive response. And they’re doing cortisol I think three times in the morning.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And it’s interesting because you do cortisol right away, you do it an hour later, you do it two hours later, and you see a major change in that first two hours. So I think people are really getting more stringent on when you do cortisol especially in the AM which is helpful.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Our lab at UT actually did a bunch of stuff on the cortisol awakening response. Which is—which is—that’s kind of—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You knew that’s oughta things go as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I totally agree. Now looking at growth hormone, how does growth hormone interplay? Kinda potentiates the effects on testosterone? How does growth hormone interplay? I know it’s connected to IGF-I goes to the liver. How does that affect testosterone and basically when you put on more muscle?

Dr. Ben House: So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know it’s a lot—

Dr. Ben House: Testos—testosterone’s gonna feed in IGF, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: A lot of times and we can get the liver obviously want to work—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: growth hormones gonna be secreted at night and then the liver’s clogged is not gonna make IGF. To me, we can— from an IGF perspective—I’m not super well versed in IGF because I work with a lot of young athletes. And I don’t think we’re gonna have a lot of  IGF problem, like IGF-1.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I’ve never—I used to measure IGF-1 all the time and like no one was out—like no one was—everybody was kinda in range. So I stopped running it. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And that’s just my take. Now, could they benefit from growth hormone? Probably, right? Uhm—but we also have to be careful with that because IGF-1 is a growth factor.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. It causes cancer.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. And well the research on that’s kinda another thing HGH is not related to increase cancer risk but I think—I think the evidence there—is there—just a little bit caution especially if you have a lot of cancer in your fate. Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. So basically, the big things to increase testosterone: sleep, protein consumpt—ad—adequate protein, I imagine, right? The right amount of stimulus and then how about the timing of nutrition? Where does the timing come in to really potentiate testosterone and growth hormone?

Dr. Ben House: Well, I don’t know if we have a lot of research on that. Like acute—acute feeding of either fat or carbohydrate will actually lower testosterone uhm—especially in the fasted state. So to me, the bang for the buck there is probably from and under recovered mechanism. So if you just crash your glycogen stores, you probably wanna refuel. Uh—in—we know the biggest thing is gonna be total energy intake. You drop your total energy intake by 15%, you’re gonna lose D3, you’re gonna lose testosterone, so getting—if—if someone’s not—if someone’s training hard, they need the—in my mind, they have a body comp issue. And they’re training hard, they need to eat as many calories as they can to maintain their weight.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So when you see these guys in the NFL, for instance, let’s say a linebacker that needs to be big, strong, but relatively lean and fast, is it really just the quality of nutrients and getting enough of it? I mean these guys literally eating two-three thousand calories   more than what they would need just at that height and weight to keep that mass on?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. In season, like you’re gonna see—you’re gonna see insane amount of calories going and going on their mouth. Like—they—they have to. They are that active. They’re—like you have a 230-250 pound man, they need a ton of food –three to five thousand calories easy. And so uhm—that’s—you gotta be careful coz that’s hard to get. And if—and that’s why we can get into trouble like intermittent fasting with that athletes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And Paul Quinn is like very, very against intermittent fasting in athletes. And — I—I’m—I’m in the same camp. Uhm—if you—body composition is completely different, health is completely different, but I think—especially in season if you have an athlete that—you gotta get—you gotta make sure that you get him first.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. What’s your take on steroids in general? Using steroid and/or using insulin as well. What’s your take on that?

Dr. Ben House: I—yeah. Yeah. This is awesome. Uhmm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Let’s do it.

Dr. Ben House: From a TRT perspective, I think we’ve—and—a lot, just like a lot—like marijuana and I say marijuana’s bad or good. Nothing is bad or good, right? It is all context.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—I think we’ve had a veil dropped over our eyes as far as testosterone the same way.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—and everybody thinks their testosterone is very negative because of baseball, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But—the overall, the evidence for testosterone replacement therapy is overwhelmingly positive.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: Overwhelming. So—uh—now, we don’t want the same thing. We don’t wanna just slap that on every guy. We wanna make sure—we wanna use all these lifestyle strategies first, but traumatic brain injury—I – you know that’s gonna affect testicul—the—testicularitis. And so—And also, blaunt trauma to testicles. My best friend played __cross. He got hit by a 110 mile cross bow in the nuts. He had three concussions, right? So is that guy—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Aww, man!!

Dr. Ben House: Is that guy gonna be able to produce his own testosterone, right? And that’s not that abnormal like you talk—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: You talk—you talk to a lot of professional athletes like how many testosterone do you have?  I don’t know—right? Especially—especially in contact sports. Ask any of the guy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s crazy. And elbo—also the xenoestrogen exposure is gonna disrupt LH- luteinizing hormone feedback loops, too, right? So we have the—we’re bombarded with the xenoestrogens and if you’re a female, obviously just in birth control pills will scrap the females as well. But you have it in the water, you have it in the pesticides and yeah—the plastics as well.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. This is something like—male health—this is why I feel so strongly about male health is coz we have no idea what’s gonna happen, right? Babies—they—their PON1’s are not very active. And PON1 is that enzyme that kids rid of persistent organic pollutants, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Yup.

Dr. Ben House: And so we got—30—the top 37 pesticides that are used in our foods are anti-androgen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So we have no idea what’s gonna happen, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And then so the—and they only run test on one of them. They don’t run it at all of them. Uh—it’s—it’s very scary. Uhm—and this is—from my protecting you have to do everything in your power to eliminate all of those potential pollutants, right? Skin care products, everything. So we gotta get kinda weird. Uhm—and you don’t know if that’s gonna have an effect but you have to—you have to make sure. You cannot—especially babies. Like we cannot put that on—Look at the male population it’s going up today like it’s pretty scary.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, especially if you—you can’t breastfeed your child and you’re feeding them soy protein isolate. My god, the phytoestrogen content that you’re getting on that can rise up to potentially a birth-control pill in amount. Especially that’s all they’re relying on for the first six months to a year.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. It—it’s wild, man. Like it—it’s—it’s gonna be—it’s gonna be really, really interesting as you see what happens in 30 years. Like when this generation gets so like their 20’s and 30’s and 40’s, it’s gonna be—it’s gonna be wild.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. I have some people here in Austin, they’re uhm—doing some run care in melatonin and I’m researching helpful companies that’s more essential oils and more natural compounds and reusing like dying to meet—dying to make just earth to treat the fire ants or using boric acid for natural things. And peppermint oil for the Hornet’s and vinegar for different things. So we’re trying to limit our load naturally. But I see people everywhere else they’re putting a lot of chemicals out there. Are you familiar with the research on lung care products and like childhood lymphomas and leukemias and such?

Dr. Ben House: No. I haven’t—Well I haven’t looked at a lot of that research coz that’s not in my wheelhouse.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it.

Dr. Ben House: But if you look at people just eating organic vs. non-organic p—produce like if you eat organic produce, you’ll get higher sperm count—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Your sperm is clear. It’s hard—that’s the dopest study at Harvard Med.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Yeah. I totally get that one, for sure. I’ll plug the documentary, too. The disappearing male.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent PBS documentary that talks about basically these estrogenic compounds in the environment that are hurting men and our future babies. So, keep that mind, too. That’s really good.

Dr. Ben House: You can kinda educate me on this, but I think all of those are gonna be mitochondrial toxin-based, right? If you jack up the mitochondria, you’re gonna have trouble with cancer.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, absolutely. You’re gonna have issues with cancer. There’s a great book it’s called, “Tripping Over the Truth”. That’s a really good book on cancer and the connection with the mitochondria. That’s a really, really, good one. And also, just the fact that it affecting the HPT access coz you screw up LH, uhm—you screw up the pineal gland, that affects melatonin that affects puberty. All these things that antagonizes itself. And then the more fats cells you have, the more estrogen you produces, then it’s a downward cycle, the more insulin-resistant you become. And it’s just this downward cascade—this metabolic accident, so to speak.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. It’s just loops everywhere. And you gotta figure out how you’re gonna break those loops and—and that’s the thing, some guy, they have like 25 loops right in. And you just wanna give them to—that’s not gonna fix the problem. You have—That’s not—you’re not helping anyone.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And what about things like anabolic steroids? The more synthetic ones? DBOL and such?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I don’t use those. Uh—I have clients who do. Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. What’s your take on that?

Dr. Ben House: I don’t—I don’t manage any of that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: What I do is I just wanna make sure that—that’s their choice, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So I—as a—as a—as—just a male in general and as a clinician, I don’t ever wanna change someone’s goals. I just wanna help them do what they do better. And so, if you wanna be a pro body builder—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You’re gonna have to play in that realm. Now I’m not the guy to run your anabolic regimen. But I can at least see like what’s going on? Are you—are you able to get rid of it? What’s your liver doing? How’s the hematocrit? Can manage all the things that could go wrong in that situation? 24:33 Uhm—the research on that is—is—is—is I think one thing that I would like to highlight—so they’ve done studies where they give a guy 600 mg a test.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And the average builder like 1100, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And so they give these guys 600 mg a test in 12 weeks. They give 20 pounds a muscle without an exercise regimen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Whoa!

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So you’ll think about—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s insane!

Dr. Ben House: You’ll think about like instagram phenoms, like you got a lot of people out there—a lot of males that I think are chasing things that aren’t physiologically possible. Uhm—and that—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You mean—

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Go ahead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You mean like the people you’re seeing align, they’re doing those things that you mention. The 600 mg of tests and they’re just getting massive amounts of muscle that you may not be all to cheat naturally. Is that what you’re saying?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. The ethotomy is uhm—so that’s a—that’s a calculation that you can do. And anything above 25 is—it’s kind of—then you start asking questions.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Like my ethotomy is like 24, right? And I’m, you know, 1—190-185-190 and anywhere from 8-11% body fat. Maybe a little bit more if I’m off my game. Uh—and so there’s kind of a line in the sand that we can cross naturally. And obviously there’s gonna be people that are above that just from a statistical perspective.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But if someone just looks on godly jacked, I mean maybe—well—who am I to say what they’re doing and I don’t wanna be the guy that’s the ultimate whistle blower.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But I think we just gotta—we just gotta—when you look at everyone else’s highlight here, you’re gonna start questioning your own self-worth and I don’t know that you wanna do that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Totally. And what do you think about uhm—tendon growth when you’re on hormones like that? Let’s say, I know more of the artificial, but in general, do you get the compensatory growth in the tendons to support the increase in muscle mass?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So that’s one of the problems, right? It’s uh—you think about how the body responds like to__

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: The first thing that we’re gonna have is neural, right?

You can get that in minutes. And the second response is muscular. And so that’s gonna take, you know, 8 minutes, maybe last if you’re—you’ve never__

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But that—that collagen response that you know, that’s building up the fascia, building up all the tissue and the bones. That takes a longest time. So when you take shortcuts, if I put a 25 lb muscle on you, and I haven’t—I haven’t build up the structure, I’m gonna—that’s when you like—biceps tear don’t happen. Like you see a bicep tear on a deadlift, like, “Uhmm” I’m thinking, what’s going on?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. So do you uhm—

Dr. Ben House: Does that make sense?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. That totally make sense. So you—something you’re careful of and you increasing collagen supplementation to help provide extra tendons building blocks, too?

Dr. Ben House: Well, everybody had—everybody is pretty much using that I have is collagen protein.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Great. So you’re doing that.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Especially in the beginning, I take everybody off away for 30 days just coz it’s a common allergen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And if they can handle that, I want it back in. Uhm—but yeah—yeah I would say that’s kind of a non-issue for me.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So you sub out—will you sub out like the way for like a high-quality, hypoallergenic pea protein in the meantime?

Dr. Ben House: No. I’ll use—I’ll use uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Beef?

Dr. Ben House: I think if you take enough pure paleo, I think you’re gonna be fine on losing content.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it.

Dr. Ben House: That’s like a 3-gram threshold. So yeah, less than whey but if you take 30-40 grams of it, you’re gonna be fine.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice. Awesome.

Dr. Ben House: Well, I know you post a lot on Facebook. You got a home gym, you’re dad in Costa Rica now, you move from Austin down there. So you got a pretty awesome lifestyle going. Give me a quick walkthrough in the day of a life of Dr. Ben. What time do you get up? What do your meals look like? What does your work out looks like? What is post and pre work out nutrition look like? What does sleep look like?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. That—that’s fun.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Ahaha.

Dr. Ben House: So my days, I wake up—one of the cool things of why I’d wanted to move here is getting closer to the equator.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—So I go to bed like 8:30. Can’t keep my eyes open.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow!

Dr. Ben House: And then I’m up naturally like you talk about cortisol awakening response, like I can’t sleep past 5:30. So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great.

Dr. Ben House: So I wake up—I wake up and I immediately sit, right? So I sat for—I meditate for 15 minutes. Done that for years. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Great.

Dr. Ben House: Never—never will stop. That’s kinda—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Any kind of meditation? Just kinda like a blank slate in the head and you’re breathing or—

Dr. Ben House: I use mantra practice. Sometimes my dad is a—is Zen teacher.

blank slate and had new breeding or is much about is sometimes my dad as it is in Zen teacher is an ordained Zen priest.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, awesome.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So in—I started—I took my whatever you wanna—I’m kinda involved when I was about 19. Uhm—probably the best gift that I was ever given uhm—was that to be able to go to that—come to that mindful practice early.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great.

Dr. Ben House: So I’ll do—I’ll do some calming. Sometimes I do some Tibetan practice which is like—it’s one of my favourites where you wish someone well that—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And the next breath, you wish someone well that you’re kinda apathetic about.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: someone that you don’t know very well. And the last, you wish someone well that you hate.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: That you don’t really like.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And it kinda—it really helps you and by the end, you’re kinda like, “Man, I don’t have that many people that I—that I don’t like and why I don’t like them.” It becomes mostly probably, you know, you start looking to word about that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: That’s one of my favourites.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it. That’s great. So morning routine, you’re getting up 5:30, you do your meditation 15 minutes, what’s next?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so if it’s a training day, I’m probably gonna have some type of easily digestible carbohydrates and Natchan in the morning coz it’s hot here. Uhm—also, I train in I’d—I like to smash myself with prob—I’m NEAT head, there’s no way around it like I’m gonna be that guy probably even if—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: ills me. Uhm—And so I’m—I’m working that glycolytic high intensity pathway uhm—3x a week. In my youth, I do it unbelievably too much, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But—so I’ll do that and I’d work for about 3 hours in the morning depending on what I got. I usually don’t take clients until the afternoon. Uhm—And then I’ll train or if it’s a non-training day, I’m just working. Uhm—and then right now, we’re building a retreat center so I have a lot of things that I—I’m the gen—I’m essentially the general contractor there so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s awesome.

Dr. Ben House: And so half my day is in Spanish, the other half is in English. Uh—sometimes I have to run up there and do stuff but—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice.

Dr. Ben House: I spend—I spend 4 hours at least a day on Pub Med in researching and writing. That’s my—that’s my thing. I love it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And you have awesome Facebook posts, too. I appreciate it. You really condense a lot of the research down.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think that’s how we move people, right? We just consistently hit them. And you do it with a podcast.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Like this is a—even if it’s—even if it’s repetitive affirmation like if it produces an action, that’s what I’m all about.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Got it. So Pub Med 4 hours a day, that’s awesome. And then patients and then what’s next after that?

Dr. Ben House: I try to stop working.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—I think a lot of us are super passionate about our craft. I’m better about that when like something isn’t coming like I have uhm—big—big presentation’s coming up in a month. So now, I’m kinda—I’m always prepping for that. Those are kind always in my mind. So I use a lot of hard mat to kinda like turn my self-doubt.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup. Yup.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—And I try to shut it down. Shut it down in the evening, definitely by 5 or 6. And I’ll just do fun stuff with my life, right? Maybe we’ll read. Maybe I’ll read something like super unscienc-y. Maybe we’ll just watch a movie. We kinda watch— I tend to push for comedies. He tends to push for dramas but uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And I always make sure—one thing I’m really, really like big on is you have a treadmill test. It’s just baseline of movement. Like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Huge.

Dr. Ben House: We put all these—we put all these pressure on exercise and it’s just a small bucket as far as like movement. It’s like NEAT is where it’s at, Non Exercise Activity Thermogenesis. And so if someone is not gaining 10,000 steps in a day, like all of the core can take can be just regulated. They’re not gonna be able to sleep. So so many good things happen if people just move.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, I agree. I mean I just got seen patients yesterday. I’ve got 25,000 steps yesterday. I mean I walk about 10 miles a day. I’m on my leg uh—my fitness power here. And I’m like—you know, there’s a leader board section and I’m always like—I always like try to be number one. So there’s yesterday right there, 21, 500. So, super. I love it.

Dr. Ben House: You’re living it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, yeah. Absolutely. And then the key thing is to I kind have my kettle bells down over here and then some push-up bars so I try to rep some of the that stuff in between patients even if I can do 2-3 minutes in like 5 or 6x a day. It just keeps the metabolism up.

Dr. Ben House: Sounds good.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I’m—I’m—I train so hard that you could I mean—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I get it. I get it.

Dr. Ben House: I’m not doing pull ups—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You’re done. You’re done after that. You’re done, man. Absolutely. So right now, we have a lot of listeners that may not be at that professional level, right? You know, frankly, they wanna be healthy, they wanna be energised, they wanna have good relationships. And then probably I can say that they probably wanna good look naked, right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah. That’s the point also.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. So what are the top 5 movement patterns those people should be doing? And maybe you wanna differentiate man and woman so in case something is different there.

Dr. Ben House: Uh— So I would say first of all, like just how people are gonna come see us for a lot of like metabolic stuff and all the—everything that we do for functional med. See somebody who’s good at movement—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Like—like you’ve been at a desk your whole life and you can’t take an exhalation. Like you probably shouldn’t be deadlifting.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Like if you’re stuck in this state of extension. I don’t know that that’s—are you really gonna even activate your hamstrings? I have no idea, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Especially __Uh—so I think we wanna be able to use—we have to be able to use the big guns. We gotta—you know—hamstrings, quads, back—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: Chest, right? And so you’re gonna—you wanna squat, you wanna deadlift, you wanna benchpress, you wanna military press, but it’s always risk vs. reward. So the risk of anytime you strapping somebody, 2 hands in a bar is higher than if you put on single limb, one arm weighted, right? Or one leg weighted.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yes.

Dr. Ben House: And so for me it’s all about how do we individualized this to the person? And if you don’t individualize this, what we’ve seen is—so one of my—one of my good friends in—we used to—we have a business together in Austin, his name is Erin Davis. He’s probably—he’s like the most unknown exercise scientist. And he’s like purposely so. He’s like a hermit. And he’s a—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Nice.

Dr. Ben House: He’s an insane, right? And so he straps up all these gadgets to this dude. And he’s like—and – he just messes bench pessing. He’s like, “What the hell? You’re chest doesn’t even turn on.” Right? And so he can’t even—out of a barbell  bench pressing, he can’t even get the guy’s chest to turn on because of his positioning. Gives him a dumbbell, boom, he can get—he can get pec activation. So I think it’s—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, wow.

Dr. Ben House: So I think it’s really important that you see somebody who’s good at movement evaluation so you can look at your position, right? Coz muscles are slaves to position.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: So the position—who the he—what are you gonna do? Uhm—and I think there’s DNS, PRI. There’s a lot of uh—FRC. There’s a lot of things that are looking at that now.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—and there’s a lot of people that are really good at it. And so see them, pay them for their time. Uh—in Austin, there’s a guy Steve Cuddy who’s amazing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhmm—Erin Davis and Pad__ is obviously really good and Dave R__ has done the same as Marcus—who’s awesome as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s great. So what are the top 5 movements?

Dr. Ben House: You tell me. What’s gonna activate the biggest muscle groups?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So for me, off the bat, it’s gonna be deadlift coz that’s the only one that connects upper body and lower body but actually doing with correct form really activating the lats, locking them down. Number two would be squat. I wanna get your take on front squat or back squat, though. I would do uh—pote—I’m a big fan of unilateral single leg like deadlift movements. I like those with cables. Big Paul Chek fan with that. I would say step ups and/or lunges and then after that, I mean, If I’m doing a movement, I would wanna do something that has explosion. So I would wanna do either uhmm— snatches or uhmm- cleans or sprints.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I would—I would pick like maybe one of those. Haha—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, let’s hear it.

Dr. Ben House: That’s good. That’s great.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I want—I want your take. Let me hear it.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah. Uh—So you gotta—upper body pulling is like super—you gotta have—you gotta have one of those in there.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: So whether—that’s probably a lot. Maybe a pull up if you can do it right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. So you’re talk—Alright. Got it.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—if someone’s goal is just health, probably most people’s goal is hypertrophy.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So in my mind, they need to get really, really really good at the fundamentals.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: Variety may not be your bestfriend.

Dr. Ben House: You may need some of it just to keep you—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: –in the game. But you gotta be—I would probably use a trap bar. Uhm—safer for the general population. You can load it up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani : Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—it’s gonna be more quad dom. Uh—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: I’m—So the—From the—from the deadlift perspective.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: I think it’s great but if you’ve been a gymnast or if your hamstring length is really, really long, if someone can palm the floor, I’m gonna be very—I’m not gonna use—I’m not gonna throw a deadlift at somebody right there.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay.

Dr. Ben House: I’m probably gonna use—I’m gonna use maybe couple of Bulgarian split squats, Which is probably my favourite exercise for the general population. Where you like get to activating the hamstring uhmm—from a front squat, back squat perspective, the muscle activation is fairly similar. Uhm—I would probably lean in the general population more towards the front squat because you’re gonna have more anterior core, you’re gonna have to stabilize, right? And also, like if you can’t do it, you—you drop it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Whereas the back you can like—you can—you can—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. You’re gonna overpower it, for sure.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. You might hurt yourself. Uh—so those are my view points. Again—and I use uhm—I think speed and doing things that people love is really important so—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You know how to Olympic lift, and you like to snatch, you like to clean obviously. I love those things. But if you don’t like doing Olympic lift, there’s a lot of—like sprinting is a great way. But in the jumping—there’s a lot of different little things that you can do to come and get that fast twitch movement coming. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Are you doing any single leg stuff?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. You can do single-leg hops, you can do, you know, whatever. You can—I do it ton. So I don’t—I do myself in all my single leg and kinda that prep toy stuff. That’s one of my cool down. So that never leaves, right? I’m doing a lot of like prehab, rehab stuff. But my meat and potatoes is my meat and potatoes. Uhm—it’s like you can’t lose sight of that. But if someone has never train in their life, their entire workout might be prehab, rehab.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. That makes sense.

Dr. Ben House: Does that make sense?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally. Now you’re reading a lot of studies. You’re spending 4 hours a day on Pub Med.  What are the key things that you look at in the studies so that you don’t get tripped up by you know—coz sometimes the conclusion might not match what the actual study has done. Just—I know we don’t have an example here, but what are the key things people should be highlighting or looking at when they’re reviewing the study?

Dr. Ben House: That’s a—that’s a problem to question. So like UT was kinda burning to us in the PhD department really, really early.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—the first thing he looks at is the chart.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So you go straight to the figures. Uh—you look at the figures and then—and then you kinda look at the stats section. You figure out— And this is from a research perspective.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Then you look at the stats section, then you look at the subjects and then you start digging the—everything that’s going on the method section. Before you look, at the conclusion and maybe—sometimes I’ll just—I’ll buzz your abstract to see what I wanna read. I’ll definitely do that. Uh—but the problem is most people, even myself, being out of the grad school for, you know, a year and half-two years. We don’t—I don’t like looking at a ton of stat research. So like Microbiome data. It’s probably the best example here. Like our lab run a ton of microbiome data.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: We got stool samples on many people, we sent that out – yeah we send it out to another lab. Uhm—and that guy get all the analysis—all the genetic analysis on the poop.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And then that guy couldn’t even analyze the data. So had to send it to a statistician to analyze the data so that we can have—we can think about it. So think about all that. Like that is—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Lots of steps.

Dr. Ben House: Now you ask the general population. You’re asking the general population to look at some kind of general linearized cluster analysis. But I don’t even know what day it is, right? And so—that uh—that—like—you know—and so they have—they tend to digestible and take away. So there’s a lot of reliance on science. If you see a study, and this is kinda something that we could talk about. You see a study that’s running like 20 paired T-test, I’m immediately like, “What the hell are you doing?” Like you can’t run—it’s—you have this 95% like a .05 alpha.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So in order for something to be statistically significant it only has to happen 5% of the time, essentially.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: And so if you run 20 tests, one of those is gonna poll just from a statistical standpoint. So that’s—you gotta be careful with that. So in that situation, I’m looking for a manova instead of an inova.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so if you see kinda like this fishing explanation which you’ll see a lot, you just see the smorgasbord of data. Uhm—be careful with that. And so—coz it can—that’s one of my favourite things to pick apart.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Anything else? So let’s summarize that. So you like the manova—you look at the—the uh T-score, right? The .05 you’re looking at that as well.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You’re looking at—

Dr. Ben House: You go ahead.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You looking at the graph—you go ahead.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. You just—so we wanna make sure that something is—something can be  statistically significant but mean to us.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: So if it is— if it’s like say, you have a .1 rise in testosterone, but it’s at the .001 level, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Okay. You have a statistically significant finding but it’s clinically meaningless. So we gotta make sure that—that their findings actually mean something.

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Awesome. That’s helpful. Anything else you wanna add on that?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think that Alan Aragon, the best way to learn about research is to read other people’s critiques of research. Uhm—and Alan Aragon has his research review. And it’s a steal. It’s 10 bucks and you get 8 years of monthly research review. So if you wanna get good at reviewing research, the best place is you just read it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally makes sense. Now you mention back earlier that you are looking at a lot of blood patterns. What are the big patterns that you’re seeing pop up? Are you looking at thyroid? Are you looking at protein digestion by some of these markers? What are you seeing in blood?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. So the first thing—the first thing that I’m gonna look at is haemoglobin and glucose control.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—that’s not the best measure for athlete because they’re gonna dispose of red blood cells faster than general population.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: So if you see a high HbA1C in athlete, you might actually be a little bit more worried. Like maybe like 5.6, you’re like, “Uh—what’s going on with you?” uhmm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: And that all goes to context, too. Like are they gonna gain? Are they trying to gain weight? Then I’m not—they’re not probably not gonna get diabetic if they have a ton of muscle mass.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—And that’s all context dependent. And I actually like—I’m—I don’t put a lot of weight in my fasting glucose and fasting insulin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—you’re probably gonna see this, right? I don’t work with a lot of chronic patients. So that—that—C peptide and those measurement fasting can be really good for those kind of patients.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But when you—when you got a guy who’s 6’1, 8% body fat, that’s probably not gonna tell you much.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—and so I—what I really like to do is I like to use glucometer protocols.’’

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: Uh—and so I have people grab—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Come on right here.

Dr. Ben House: Just grab it 13x a day and see what happens.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And send me—send me a graph and send me when you eat and let’s have a—let’s have a discussion. Coz if you eat 3 rice cakes and you go to, you know, 200. That does not happen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You’re storing glucose in urine like we don’t want that to happen. So that’s the way we can kind of, you know, tweak carb load. The next thing uhm—obviously, you need thyroid support.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You need thyroid hormone. It runs in every cell of the human body. So I’m gonna drop—from there, I’m probably gonna drop down to thyroid and see what’s going on there. Uhm—I mean I’ve picked up so many like—Hashimoto’s in like 14-year-old kid like one of the best pictures in Texas.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Dr. Ben House: And he couldn’t recover, right? He constantly has this stupid injuries. And we grab  his lab work, his TPL is like 300.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Whoa!

Dr. Ben House: And we’re like—Yeah, and we’re like, “okay”  And he feels better, right? All these—we can’t—I can’t—his dad is like, “Oh, he needs to eat like Brady.” All that stuff—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No.

Dr. Ben House: I’m like, “No, he doesn’t.” Like—and now the kid is taking ownership of it which is amazing. He’s like—he’s like, “No, I’m not gonna eat that.” And so now, he on—he pretty much eats only autoimmune paleo. He have some rice, he does okay with rice. Uhm—and he couldn’t—he was overweighing, still crushing it like meanest curve ball uhm—this side of Mississippi. And so—but now—he’s—he’s—he looks amazing, right?

And if you play at these schools, these Texas schools, you gotta look the part. Like even if you’re—even if you’re amazing, you have to—you have to look like an animal.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely.

Dr. Ben House: That’s kind of unfortunate.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. I mean have Hashimoto’s myself and I play baseball and sports and football growing up. And I had lots of injuries coz I was trying to eat 11 servings of grains in the food pyramid, so there’s a lot of misinformation out there. And again, a lot of people are seriously inflamed. And the more inflamed they are, the more catabolic. The more catabolic, the more they can’t recover and uh—put on muscle and heal, essentially.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. To me it’s like—it’s all about breaking cycles, right? My dad has celiac disease.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Wow.

Dr. Ben House: We found out—we found out when he was like 40, like 10 inches of his colon moves—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, man.

Dr. Ben House: His gallbladder is tightening up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yikes.

Dr. Ben House: Like that’s why I got into this. I was gonna go to medical school.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And my dad got super screwed up by the conventional medical system. He was having pain killer on demand. Uh—and then I was in Colorado and I—Breaking the Viscous Cycle, I’ve read the book—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: And I was like, “Hey dad, let’s just change your diet. Three A’s set him free, he was struggling like 10 years.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know. Isn’t that crazy? Dude, I know. I see it everyday. I mean—it’s—we have he most rewarding job in the world.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah, for sure.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Because you get someone banging his head against that conventional medical wall for 10 years plus, at some point, they started throwing it back on you. Saying it’s in your head, and they start making the Psychophol, right? And writing scripts for Zoloft and such. And then you’re just like, “ My god, this can’t be real.” You know—it’s gotta be real. So looking where you’re at, uhm—you mentioned uhm— blood markers. Anything else? You’ve talked about thyroid. Any specific cut off that you wanna talk about with TSH, T3 or antibody levels?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—Yes. So what I’m—I’m use uh—I use a software And so I’m always looking at total T3, total T4, free T3, free T4 and—so I’m always looking at what’s going on with that. Are they producing a ton of T4 but then they’re not converting any of it to T3?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: All the thyroid hormones are bound up. Like are they on—which is to me—like I see it constantly like if I take on a female client. I’m like, “Oh, your thyroid hormone is bind up, are you on birth control?” “Yeah.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: There it is, right? It upregulates thyroid body globulin.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Uptake. Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: One of the ways that we know—we know that testosterone increases lean mass and metabolism is that it dominates your thyroid binding globulin. So—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. Yeah. Makes sense. You see that in PCOS, right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Exactly. So we got the thyroid. What are you looking at for protein digestion? Are you looking at globulin, creatinine, serum protein, albumin? What are you looking at?

Dr. Ben House: Uh—so yeah I think total protein and globulins are soft markers for—I always think of them as like check engine lights. They’re not like end-all be-all.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: But if I see them low, “Oh my god, let’s keep some work add on that situation.” Uhm—and then kidney markers—In athletes, like this is like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Bone creatinine.

Dr. Ben House: Oh my god, this is like—I love talking about this because that—does can actually—kidney markers are essentially useless, right, in athlete. Because blood urine nitrogen is the breakdown of protein products.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right.

Dr. Ben House: So if you’re in a Ketone, high protein diet, you’ve already—you’ve knocked that up. Now creatinine is indirect measure of muscle mass. So if I have a jacked gorilla who’s in a ton of protein, he’s automatically gonna have a GFR that’s probably pretty screwed up. But his kidney function maybe fine. Uh—so the best marker there is statin C. And so if someone is super worried about their kidney function, I’ll run that coz that’s not affected by protein intake or muscle mass.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Statin C for the kidney?

Dr. Ben House: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Okay. Yeah. Yeah. And I’m not seeing patients that are at the same level as you know, being an athlete but I do try to keep them 48 hours away from strenuous workout so you don’t get those false positives.

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I do that as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—but the re—it’s all individual. So they’ve done studies, it can be 10 days that you’ll see like liver enzyme’s high, bilirubin high. So you can—you can see those things. It all depends, some people get back in 48 hours and obviously we can’t tell people not to train for 10 days. Uhm—that’s not gonna work.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Right.

Dr. Ben House: We won’t do that. But I think 48 hours and making sure that their hydration is really, really solid.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. And do you think muscle soreness would also be a pretty—pretty good subjective indicator? Making sure that they’re not incredibly sore or like in pain or you know, hurting from the workout?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think it’s probably good from an inflammatory standpoint.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: You’re gonna—with CRP, you’re gonna see an acute rise with exercise and that is a positive in that overtime. Uhm—I—I hate muscle soreness like it’s— maybe—I don’t know if we have research to say that. It’s such a subjective indicator.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. Totally.

Dr. Ben House: And it’s so variable.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. Is there anything else you wanna let the listeners know? Anything else on your health pocket that you’re kind of researching or on top of mind?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. I think we can kinda get lost in kind of the little things, right And so—just make—I see a lot of people that are, you know, worried about something regarding their health.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally.

Dr. Ben House: And that—that’s probably not good. If you are incessantly worrying about your health, that—that’s a problem.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Uh-hmm.

Dr. Ben House: I saw, you know, a lot of type A people that come to functional med and so one of our jobs is like, “Hey, like, you’re not gonna die.” Like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: This is okay. Like—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It’s alright.

Dr. Ben House: You have a homocysteine of 9, you’re not gonna get killed tomorrow. There’s things that we can do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: Let’s do all the things. So I’d say focus on the effort—not necessarily— always focus on effort. Uhm—and that’s my biggest thing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Got it. And who is your ideal patient? Coz I know you made the switch from the athletic world to the functional medicine world now. You had your experience with your dad with the celiac thing. So you have some autoimmune experience. Who is your ideal patient? Someone who wanna come to see you?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. My ideal patient is a male, any—any age range, uh—but probably a male that just wants to look good, feel good, look good naked, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: That’s my prototypical client. Uhm—and then, anyone is free to email me, obviously. And like I have—I get crazy emails like, “Hey, I have a—I have a tumor in my hypothalamus. Can you help me out? And no, I can’t but uhm—let me—let me refer you out to someone who might be able to reboot your entire endocrine system.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. So functionalmedicinecostarica.com ,right?

Dr. Ben House: Yeah. That’s the website.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Love it, man. Very cool. Anything else?

Dr. Ben House: Thank you for all that you do. And just uh—just putting out there information that we all have—we all have our mediums. And you do a really good job in just finding awesome people and interviewing them. And—and letting them tell story. So thank you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. I appreciate it, Dr. Ben. I appreciate it. And the last question for you, if you’re on a dessert island, you can only choose one supplement, one herb, one nutrient, what is it?

Dr. Ben House: Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Haha—

Dr. Ben House: I’m gonna pick magnesium.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Magnesium. Okay. Alright.

Dr. Ben House: I’m probably get—If I will get a multi, I’m gonna—I mean—If I’m training on this island, uhm—maybe a protein supplement if I can’t find enough meat.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah.

Dr. Ben House: But uh—yeah definitely—I mean most athletes are deficient in magnesium. It’s—if you give an athlete magnesium, and they’re deficient and like, they’re gonna feel a lot better. Uhm—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Awesome, my man. Well, thank you for that great feedback. Doctor House in the house. You can see him at functionalmedicinecostarica.com

Dr. Ben House, I appreciate you being on the show.

Dr. Ben House: Thank you, sir. Have a great day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You too. Take care.


References:

functionalmedicinecostarica.com

Documentary on The Disappearing Male

Tripping Over the Truth by Travis Christofferson

Breaking the Viscious Cycle by Elaine Gottschall

 

What Causes PMS? Premenstrual Syndrome Holistic Approach

What Causes PMS

By Dr. Justin Marchegiani

Let’s go into a discussion about PMS or Premenstrual Syndrome – the symptoms and hormones involved and why it occurs in some women. Watch the video and see the overview of what’s really happening in a woman’s body to gain an understanding of this issue.


Symptoms

Symptoms of PMS

A lot of women are probably very familiar with it. Whether it be causing headaches, cramping, abnormal blood flow, breast tenderness. You name it, I’ve seen it.

Overview of the cycle

The average female cycle is 28 days. And 14 days is the halfway point. And what you see in the first half of the cycle, you’re going to see a lot of estrogen in that first half of the cycle, from there, it’s going to drop, and come back a little bit in the second half.

The first half, this is the estrogen-based part of it and your second half of the cycle, will be progesterone. What you’re going to see is nice, low-dose of progesterone in the beginning, and its’ going to come right up, and then nice crash at the bottom here. And you’re going to see the second half of your cycle, predominated with progesterone. Estrogen is going to really happen in the first half. Why is that? Well, what estrogen is doing is use your uterine lining like cells, thickening that uterine lining up nicely.

And then what happens in the second half of the cycle with that nice, thick uterine lining, you get the egg right there.

So important now is this middle area right here, this is where ovulation occurs. It’s kind of the intermediary between the estrogen and the progesterone and that’s where ovulation occurs.

So I think it’s really important to actually know what’s going on in your cycle.

Want to learn more about your ovulation cycle and PMS? CLICK HERE 

Cause

Causes of PMS

When the progesterone drops in that second half, this is where menstruation occurs. This is where you actually have your period. What we find is majority of women that have PMS symptoms- the breast tenderness, the cramping, the whole nine yards- their progesterone is actually much lower. So imagine this line, it’s much lower.

So we have low amounts of progesterone in the second half of the cyle. And that can trigger a lot of the symptoms we’re referring to.

So you’re probably thinking, what’s causing this low progesterone?  Well, the question is, where is the progesterone going? Well progesterone is actually getting converted into a hormone, called cortisol.

Cortisol is essentially a glucocorticosteroid. Alright. So, gluco – glucose. Alright. To watch sugar stability is one of the main role of cortisol. Steroid – inflammation, pain.

So one of the most common things that drive low progesterone in the second half of the cycle is blood sugar issues. You’re not getting enough high-quality fat and protein. It’s very important – Inflammation, Pain. This could be chronic back pain, knee pain, neck pain. This could be from too much or too little exercise. This could also be from food allergens. This could also be from infections. There’s really no magic pill for it. PMS, there’s no magic pill for it coz it can be a combination of these issues.

Recommendation

Recommendations

So what we do here is, we actually address the adrenal glands. The adrenals are really responsible for producing cortisol, as well as progesterone.

If we can address adrenal glands, we’re going to have a huge impact and balance in this last half of the cycle here. We’ll also have a huge impact for the rest of the lifestyle concern, which is blood sugar, exercise lifestyle, diet and things like that.

We also use some specific herbal blends and even adrenal support to actually help balance this last half of the cycle up.

 


If you have any more questions, please shoot me an email or schedule the consultation and we can go a little bit deeper with your concerns.

Schedule a consult and get more information regarding PMS by CLICKING HERE

Natural menopause solutions live – Podcast #123

Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Evan Brand engage in a discussion about menopause. Join them as they share their expertise on women dealing with menopause, including the associated symptoms, hormones, and health factors creating an impact to this period.

Menopause is a naturally occurring transition in a woman’s life. It is a period wherein women undergo a lot of changes in their bodies. This talk will give you important information about these changes caused by hormones, including hormone function and drug interaction. Find out about the effects of infection, as well as other health related issues involving the adrenals, blood sugar and stress making menopause a more challenging experience than it already is. Learn about the natural ways and solutions to keep your health in check during the menopausal period.

In this episode, we cover:

6:26   Menopause: definition and symptoms

9:17   Adrenal gland and hormones

13:40   Conventional Solutions

17:08   Testing hormone preparations

19:31   Bioidentical hormones & herbs

29:20   Dietary recommendations

 

itune

 

 

youtuve

 

 

 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Hey, there! It’s Dr. Justin Marchegiani, alright. I’m hooked on this Youtube live thing. We’re doing our podcast today, Evan and myself. So we are- So we talked about doing menopause uh, today. That was a topic I was listening and learning and reading a lot about it yesterday. I’m honestly dealing with menopause patient for the last decade but always brushing up on my info. Evan what’s going on, man? How you doing?
Evan Brand: Hey, I’m doing awesome. This is fun. Isn’t it great today?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: It is. I love it. Very cool. So how’s your morning goin’?

Evan Brand: It’s pretty good. I still think that the, the best car for me is gonna be the Tesla because it is the HEPA air purifier in it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Oh, nice. You in the market for a new car?

Evan Brand: Well the Honda Accord, I mean I love it, trust me but, taking in all those diesel fumes like I was telling you about even with the re __ on, I went over to the dealership and they were like, “Sir, you’re never gonna be able to block all of the fumes outside.” I said, “I will if I could have a HEPA filter.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally, man.

Evan Brand: I think those Tesla’s are like biologically, like they put biological warfare down or something they will still be safe.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yup, yup. Crazy. Oh, we’re live today. And we’re gonna be chatting aboutmenopause which is an exciting topic for me. I love my menopausal female patients because they’re really motivated. Number one, uh they need a lot of help. Number two, in the conventional medical options for them is pretty poor. So, yeah.

Evan Brand: I’m excited to be able to help. Yeah. Totally.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And we got a live chat going in the background which is exciting. So people wanna ask some questions. We may interject here and go live to some of their questions. That’s really exciting, too.

Evan Brand: Where shall we start?You wanna go over symptoms? Talk about- what, I mean most women if they’re dealing with menopause, they’re gonna know about the symptoms but people listening you know- Hey, Butter. Sometimes-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: She’s Independence. She’s my biggest fan.

Evan Brand: Awesome.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Actually, my wife’s my biggest fan. She’s probably second.

Evan Brand: Sometimes you know- whatwe’ll find is with women you know- if they get their ovaries removed, they’re basically gonna skip perimenopause or just gonna go straight to full-blown menopause. Which is what’s happened, for example with my mom, getting the full hysterectomy, for example. You know at 40 something years old, she had already been put into full-blown menopause, basically. And so, she was experiencing a lot more symptoms a lot more rapidly. And say a woman who’s naturally gonna transition.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Totally. I have to say, Evan. Honestly, I’m mesmerized by that chest hair that’s coming out, man. I’m sorry.

Evan Brand: I know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I was just like “Whoa! okay.”

Evan Brand: Can you believe that?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I know.

Evan Brand: I just actually, I just, I just show my wife last night and said,“Babe, this thing is growing north right now.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. Well on hormones, you know- hair,or hair growth will be a big connection with that. So we can chat about that today. Very cool.

Evan Brand: First thing, I need to button up this extra button here, so I’ll do it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I don’t know, man. It’s gonna be really hard for me to pay attention during –

Evan Brand: Alright, alright. Let me button this up then. I apologize for my manliness.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: No. You’re good, man. You’re good.

Evan Brand: Alright. Go over symptoms. What should we- I mean hot flashes are gonna be very common. Of course, everyone’sgonna know about hot flashes. They’re probably bored of hearing about that. But something that we see a lot, too is depression and mood swings. Something that could definitely be fixed if we take a look at the adrenal glands. And I guess were to hit on that adrenal connection, too. Because the backup generators, which are the adrenals, which should hopefully be kicking in and supporting women. A lot of times they had adrenal fatigue already. So when the ovaries and hormones go down, the adrenals are already tanked. So you’re not gonna have that backup generator that’s gonna help you out.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly. I’d say the big is, let’s define menopausal a bit more. So menopause is that time where typically the ovarian function, the ovarian output of hormones is-is running low. It starts to get depleted. And that’s typically because the follicles that a woman is born with, they start to run out. So a woman typically has you know, hundreds of thousands of follicles at birth. And then eventually, only maybe 400 or so are viable. So you fertility for a woman typically, let’s say on average, is gonna be from maybe 13 to 15, depending on when they have their period at first all the way up to the early to mid 40s. Some even late 40s uhm, today as well. So that’s kinda like your- your viable uhm, window for fertility. So when those eggs start to run out, and what starts to happen is your ovarian function starts to diminish. And then that typically, it’s about, consider it about a one year time frame until you actually get in to uh-menopause. That’s the perimenopausal timeframe. It’s about one year until you- One year without a period is what you consider to be menopause. And obviously if you get a, your ovaries removed, like hysterectomy wise, obviously that’s instantaneous menopause, right. Coz you’re missing the hormone output. For most women it’s about 12 months about a cycle. And that’s when you technically hit menopause. And then menopause typically can last until you’re instantly postmenopausal. Can typically last about 10 years. So that can kinda scare some women. And if you get your universal move, like a partial hysterectomy- you keep your ovaries but you get your uterus removed- women typically will go through menopause about four years faster. So the uterus does have some hormonal interplay. So again, because you- let’s say have a partial hysterectomy and still have your ovaries, you still will go through menopause. And it’s important that you get that support. And a lot of women they get their uterus removed. It’s typically because, maybe endometriosis or severe fibroids, or some kind of excessive hemorrhage, or bleeding. They cause them to get removed in the first place.

Evan Brand: Well even I’ve heard of some women saying just because they don’t wanna have a period anymore and doctor will still do the surgery.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. That’s not a good move because your uterus does have some effect on hormonal output. Again the research and people don’t quite have their head around it, that you have, around hundred percent. But there’s still a reason why that is there. So the first aspect is you know, the definition, one year without a period. That’s number one. Number two we have that perimenopausal timeframe, which is about 12 months. And then once you’re in menopause, about 10 years until your technically postmenopausal. Now all the symptoms that we talked about earlier, what are they? There gonna be hot flashes, of course, right.There gonna be mood issues, lack of femininity, right. Feeling less like a female, less like woman, uhm called the sagging breasts. Uhm, I would say a little loss of elasticity in skin. As your estrogen drops, that can shrink breast tissue. It can also stimulate or decrease the stimulation of collagen. So the skin starts getting- losing that quality, and that elasticity, and that nice healthy useful tone, hair loss, mood issues, brain fog, osteoporosis, obviously vaginaldrynesss, depression. So these are all symptoms of the ovaries losing their ability to function. And then what starts to happen is your adrenal glands really have to pinch-hit and come to the table.

Evan Brand: Yup. So if you got infections or your adrenals are tanked, when the- if we use the pinch-hit term, they’re not gonna be able to doit very well because you’ve got these other problems. Or the diet is not good, you’ve got blood sugar swings. So without healthy blood sugar, it’s gonna be tough to have healthy adrenal function.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly.

Evan Brand: You know the thing that’s interesting is a lot of women get talked to about menopause like it’s a disease. But it’s not really a disease. It just seems that the modern world in terms of either too much or too little exercise, and a diet that’s not rich in good fats and good proteins, those are the modern things that we’re up against. So menopause is becoming more prevalent. And then also, it’s gonna be more severe, too. Because our ancestors they’ve dealt with menopause. You know, this is a natural transition, but now we’ve- were up against these new things that the modern world present. So therefore, we have to play the cards a little bit smarter, make sure we’ve got the nutrition down, make sure we’ve got the exercise portion down, and then we always get to the underlying issues that could still be affecting things or making things more intense. Like say, an infection which you and I find hundreds and hundreds a year. And menopausal women, a lot of times there is adrenal issues calls from infections.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely.And to- I wanna add, we’re actually doing this podcast live. So anyone watching live right now, feel free and write in a question or two. And we’ll be able to see if we can intermingle the questioning with the podcast. Sothis is gonna be this kinda new little set up here. If people are likin’ this, we may do more of it. So we’re pretty excited about it. I did a couple YouTube lives this morning and people want a couple questions answered. But still do it as long as we can get a turn into the topic.

Evan Brand: Yup. So-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I got a little Kombucha right now. I’m getting my ginger Kombucha in here.Nice.Love it, love it. Nice.

Evan Brand: I’m drinking uh, Vitamin C actually right now. Vitamin C tonic out ofout of little mug that says having tea with a friend brightens any day.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Here, here. Touche on that one. Excellent. So we talked about hot flashes a little bit. Can you talk about- Can you go into like, the adrenaland why the adrenals are so important for women that are getting ready to go into menopause?

Evan Brand: Yeah. Absolutely. Well so, if we look at the top of the food chain of hormones, if you type in steroid hormone pathway chart online, you can see where cholesterol, which is going to come from diet. Also of course the liver and all of that. But you got cholesterol at the top of the food chain here. Then downstream we’ve got progesterone. You’ve got pregnenolone. You’ve got your estrogen, your estriol, your estradiols, your testosterone, your DHEA’s. You’ve got your aldosterone. You’ve got cortisol. You got all these hormones that are depending on a pretty good balance. But as we pry talked about before, what happens is the pregnenolone steal, some people debate that. Some people say that it’s not true. But just based on what we have done, and what we do, to me it makes perfect sense of the pregnenolone steal is perfectly real. Which is the process where men and/or women that are under significant stress, the body is going to prioritize cortisol production over the production of these other hormones like your estrogens. And so when menopause is occurring, and the levels of estrogen and progesterone are dropping, now you’re just dependent on the adrenals and this cortisol, this whole adrenal cortisol- and I guess we’ll call it backup generator- to do the work that was being done by two generators before. Now you’ve got one generator doing the same amount of work. Now, if you’ve already been in sympathetic fight or flight mode, for significant amount of time, you’re gonna have trouble. So when we pull your adrenal cortisol results, we’re gonna see that you’ve likely got low free cortisol. Which means since you’re not outputting the amount that you should be. So the analogy I use is the smartphone. So a lot of women where looking at, they could be, we would like to seem around 28 or 30 units of free cortisol. I’ll make a bio health test, for example. But a lot of women are showing up anywhere say 10 to 15 units of cortisol. So that’s like you starting your day with your smart phone battery charged at 50%.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah

Evan Brand: And you’re trying to get through the whole day. It’s gonna be tough. And so this is why having healthy adrenals and having a good adrenal protocol in place, for me is essential not only for men and women that are you know, younger. But older women especially are going to benefit from some of the adaptogens and strategies that we can chat about.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: 100%. Now, looking at the adrenals, I always thought patients are like a backup generator, right. They’re gonna produce a significant amount of DHEA which can go down the hormonal cascade and can become testosterone andro and primarily at a female, we’re gonna go down more of the estrogen pathway. So if you look at testosterone andro it can also float downstream into either estrone, or estradiol estrone, and estradiol.And then from there it can get converted in the liver to estriol. Estriol is gonna be about 80% of all the estrogens in your body will be estriol. During reproductive age, estradiol will predominate as your main estrogen. And then when you go into menopause, estrone will be what predominates when you’re menopausal. So let’s break that down. We have E1, E2, E3-really simple. The names have a good giveaway. Estrone has O-N-E in it. So that’s E1. Estradiol, D-I, right. like 2 dice, E2.And then estriol, T-R-I, that’s gonna be E3. So you’ve E1, E2, E3. E1, estronethat predominate when you’re menopause. E2, during reproductive age. E3 will be what’s there the majority of the time. Uhm- but it’s weaker, and it will significantly predominate when you’re pregnant. So what happens is when you’re going to menopause, E2 starts to decrease, and we start to get more dependent upon the E1. The problem is E2 and E1 are stronger estrogens and could be proliferative. Meaning, they can increase risk of cancer and other health issues. So, if we are gonna support a female with some bioidentical hormone preparation- Bioidentical meaning the hormone molecule matches what’s in your body, typically plant-based.We’ll do it with estriol, E3. And we’ll even typically combine a tiny bit of progesterone in there to support the female hormones.

Evan Brand: Should we talk about the conventional solutions,like hormone replacement therapy? Like the one that comes to mind here about a lot as Premarin?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah. But yeah- yet but you Prempro or Premarin Provera?

Evan Brand: Yeah. I mean- That’s- that’s it. That’s linked with increased risk of heart disease now.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yeah, in cancer- I mean the women’s health initiative study uhm- found that about 10-15 years ago. So it’s- it hasn’t been prescribed as much for hot flashes and menopausal symptoms. But it’s still is being prescribed. Their more natural, kinda anti-aging doctors are out there, typicallymedical-based. They’re prescribing hormones. The problem with it is they prescribe like it’s candy. They prescribe it like it’s a vitamin or nutrient. And hormones are really, really powerful, right. Hormones are measured in like nanograms, which is like one speck of salt in like a swimming pool, right. So it’s like very- you know- very, very sensitive. You know, amounts of these things. So looking at hormones, we wanna make sure we don’t give it like a supplement. We wanna make sure we actually test. So, we’re not guessing when we prescribe it. It’s specific to what the patient needs. Number two- number two, is we actually have to make sure the diet and lifestyle is dialed in coz that’s a really, really important starting point. And I would say even more important, most medical doctors or bioidentical doctors totally ignore the adrenal portion of that. So the adrenal is just totally not even on site. And we know how important the adrenals are for that backup generating of the sex hormones, especially when you on menopause. So imagine that backup generator, if it’s on empty, or the smartphone analogies on low, that means symptoms. So you gotta turn the generator when the storm comes in, it’s not on full. Guess what? Your power is not gonna work. There’s gonna be a lot of things in your house aren’t gonna work, like you have full power. And what that equates to a menopausal female, is symptoms. Mood issues, skin issue, hot flashes, of course, vaginal dryness, low libido, right. So those are the things we gotta be very mindful of, when we’re dealing with menopausal females.

Evan Brand: Let’s talk about what the options are. I mean even if you do go bioidentical, a lot of times you’re going to get hormone creams. But the more, more that we develop hormone creams, I’m finding that- that can disrupt other hormones, and it’s gonna be tough to measure, it’s gonna to be tough to get the right dose. And so now, I’ve been reading a lot about sublingual drops- for bioidentical hormones. Supposedly, that’s the best because you can determine exactly what dose you’re taking. For me that goes out of my- you know, that goes out of my pay grade coz I’m not a prescribing medical doctor. But it’s at least good to know that there are options out there for women because if they are going to go talk to their endocrinologist, or you know- some type of MD that’s more integrated. Hopefully they can know that, you definitely don’t want to go oral, you definitely don’t want to go with the cream. But if you can go sublingual drops, with the bioidenticals. However, in a lot of cases, if we are getting the diet dialed in, orgetting like some omega-3, fatty acid supplements in, we’re removing synthetic estrogens, the plastics, and all the other exposures, the phthalates, and all the other endocrine disruptors, and health and skincare products, and then we’re addressing underlying issues, I’ve had great success with many women- women. I know you have, too. In- we’re not- we’re not saying,“hey, go get this drug”, “go get the struggle get this prescription”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Exactly. So when it comes to hormone preparations, number one, how do you test it?Most medical doctors they’re gonna primarily use a serum bound test, a serum blood test to look at hormonal levels. Now the problem is, serum represents a 100% of all the hormones that are in your blood, right. The problem is only about 2% maybe 2 to 5% hormone’s a free fraction. So the problem is because a small- for such a small small percent of the hormones that are free, it’s such a small percent out of the hundred percent. It’s really hard to measure it because you don’t have a small enough gauge to sense it.

Evan Brand: That make sense.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: So it’s like using a thermometerthat only tells youyou’re either 97- 98- 99.Doesn’t tell you the in between temperatures. So your 97-9, it may say you’re still 97, right. So imagine that’s kinda like the blood testing. So we use a free fraction test that will break it up and look at the free fraction of the hormone. Whetherwe’re using bio house salivary cortisol, or salivary progesterone or estrogen test. That’ll look at the free fraction. Or we use the Dutch testing, that will also look at the free fraction. Excuse me.The Kombucha gets uh- gets me a little bit burpy.

Evan Brand:Ha ha

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: I apologize for that. Uhm- so looking at that, we will wanna do tests that look at the free fraction. Number one- so salivary test or like a really good Dutch test by Precision Analytics is great. Because we get a more fine two-metric of where those free fraction of the hormones are at. Again, there are some blood tests that can- I think you can look at estradiol-free. I don’t think you can look at progesterone-free or cortisol-free on a blood test, yet. You can look at serum cortisol, you- you can look at estradiol-free, you can look at testosterone-free. I do not think you can look at progesterone-free. So again, we wanna be able to look at the free fraction coz that’s what bioavailable and combined into a receptor site.

Evan Brand: Yeah, I wanted to mention the- Dr. Jonathan Wright, which- I believe it’s the same- it’s the same guy who wrote the book on stomach acid, which is I know one your favorites on my favorite books.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yup.

Evan Brand:  That he’s got some good info with Mercola about administering bioidentical hormones. And are talking about the version that they call tri S, which is supposedly 80%, estriol, 10% of each estrone and estradiol. So it sounds like- for even you know people like my mom, any woman that’s had you know- a full hysterectomy, it sounds like this is gonna be pretty foundational to- to overall health. It sounds like you can’t really out supplement your way if you have had you know- a full hysterectomy like this. What’s your take?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Right. Remember what I said? I said 80% estriol, right. So think about it, right. With a tri S, what is it? 80-10-10. 80% E2- I’m sorry-E3, estriol that’s the tri S. So 80% estriol, E3. 10% estradiol and 10% estrone. And that’s good if you can get it compounded that way. That’s fine. Again it’s still gonna be a cream and the problem is some women don’t do well with the cream because it super saturates in the subcutaneous tissue and starts coming out in uncontrollable amounts. You don’t get dosed into the bloodstream as efficiently let’s say, as a sublingual. They can go right into your sublingual tissue in your buccal tissue, go right to the blood, and there’s no like real fat in the mouth. Soright in there, and your good. Now the differenceis Dr. Jonathan Wright’s talked about this. If he does sublingual’s- I’m sorry-If he does the creams, he typically does it inter vaginally because of the submucosa down there. They can go right into the bloodstream. So that’s helpful. But again, you know, I’ve dealt with a lot of women that do the creams and such,inter vaginally, which can work decent on menopausal women. Not so much on cycle, and I’ll tell you why.But again– it’s some issues issues. I mean not to get too graphic here, you can get to the underwear, you can come out. Uh- it’s okay if you can do it at nighttime when you’re lying down. But sometimes you get discharge and they can wrap women’s underwear. They can be a little uncomfortable. So it just depends on what you like. If women have already done that- done it that method. And then they’re doing well, and the hormones are stable, and they didn’t have any of those issues that I mentioned, fine. If not, we’ll typically recommend some of the sublingual drops. Some of the estriol and/or progesterone drops. We’ll also support the adrenal glands themselves. And then will also use some specific herbs to help modulate the sex hormones. We’ll use wild yam. We’ll use chaste tree, or vitex. We’ll use dong quai. We’ll use black cohosh. Uh- we’ll use some of those herbs to help modulate the receptor sites. I’ll even use some specific phenotypes of mock guys. Some specific phenotypes for cycling women and/or menopausal women that- that will help with even some of those symptoms of the receptor site level, depending if we have a cycling or a menopausal issue.

Evan Brand: How about soy during this time?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Well if you’re using specific soy isoflavones, that can be helpful to modulate estrogen receptor sites. Again, we’ve talkedvery negatively about soy, but again soy if you extract the isoflavones, you’re also not getting all of the proteins and the  in the goitrogens, and the trypsin inhibitors. All of the negative effects. And of course, it’s gonana be extracted from a non-GMO source. So my opinion, you can still get some significant benefits. But where it’s the genestein the other types of soy isoflavones can be helpful for modulating, yes, receptor sites.

Evan Brand: Sure, sure. And I briefly mentioned omega-3’s but that’s another good one. Just plenty of omega-3 fats so good, high-quality triglyceride form of fish oils, which is what you and I use. So if you are takin’ a fish oil and you get fish burps, it’s probably ethyl ester. And that’s not good. If it smells fishy, most of the time,that’s not good, either. And you want to-

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: You want the triglyceride form.

Evan Brand: Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: That’s it.

Evan Brand: Which is basically is as close as you can get to the raw form or the form that you would get if you’re just actually eating the fish.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. So looking back at all the different things we talked about some herbs to help modulate receptor sites. We talked about using potential bioidentical hormones, our biases more towards the sublingual. If you were to do intravaginal cream, if have to be intravaginal, ideally not on the skin as much. Because of the super saturation in the subcutaneous tissue. And I see it on test. When you see like literally women are off the charts. You’re like, “hey, your doctor’s just measuring blood.”And because it doesn’t have a small metric to pick up that unit 2% or so, it may look okay in the blood, but not the okay in reality in- in the spectrum of looking at the free.

Evan Brand: Yeah. I’ve seen that, too. I’ve seen it with men, too. Which is all other conversation but testosterone replacement therapy, where just go so far above the 6, 6000 about 6000. That’s like where the test maxes out. And its like, “whoa! something’s not right.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Exactly. Now, looking at cycling women, why do I wanna avoid creams altogether? Well for the most part with cycling women, their hormones are gonna be at different place in the cycle. The first half of the cycle is gonna be the follicular phase, where estrogen starts to go up around day 2. Day 3, it taps out around day 12 to 13. And then it drops as progesterone rises. That’s where your ovulation is.That estrogen drops and progesterone rise is where ovulation is. Progesterone comes up to the top. Estrogen nears down low and they both dropped together around day 27 and day 28 to signal bleeding. And again, the reason why this is an issue is, because if you if you can’t pull estrogen or pull progesterone all at the right time, then that can throw off the cycle. Because if estrogen and progesterone aren’t dropping exactly when it should, you’re not gonna have adequate menstruation. It may delay things. It may slow off your cycle. So because of that, I don’t like creams on my cycling female patients. I like to be really specifically progesterone exactly what days. I don’t want any spillover on either end. And I typically don’t use any estrogen with female hormone patients that are cycling because most women are estrogen dominant. And will typically be able to support the estrogen via the adrenal side via some of the DHEA and pregnenolone and some of the modulating herbs.

Evan Brand: So if you went to a standard MD or like an integrative MD, are they can be able to provide those sublinguals? I mean- how common is that? I know were talking about- sometimes we talk about subjects where the optimal thing is just unheard of in conventional. But I mean- is this sublingual, is this popular enough for some woman could go down the street to a clinic and get- get help with that?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uhm, most conventional medical doctors aren’t gonna- aren’t gonna be able to do the sublingual coz it’s just not in their wheelhouse. Uhm- some do troches which maybe a close second, right. A lot of them will do the pellets, and then most of them will do the creams. Just how they’re taught. You know, if you look at a lot of the ___, some of the anti-aging physicians, they’re gonna do more the creams. Dr.Jonathan Wright does this, but at least respect that it’s intravaginal. So you don’t have the subcutaneous build up. But again, I think the more important piece here to look at, is the adrenal aspect. We gotta look at the adrenals. And if anyone’s viewing right now, and wants to chime in, and ask a question via chat, feel free to do that. And we’d love to answer any of the questions that are on or related to the topic. This is a new thing we’re testing out. So the more people that engage or comment on this afterwards, that’s gonna motivate us to do more of these.

Evan Brand: Totally. Yes. So, the- you’ve hit on the good point, which is, yes- you can go there with the hormone replacement therapy. It has done good things. It can do good things, but I’m not prescribing it and I’m getting- I canprescribe but I’m not a prescribing MD. But just doing the stuff that I’ve done, I’ve been able to make 80, 85, 90% better in terms of symptoms that menopausal women are experiencing. And that’s with no drugs. That’s looking at the adrenals, that’s getting the gut infections taken care of, that’s looking at mitochondrial health, that’s getting rid of candida problems, that’s making sure they’re going to bed on time, that’s making sure they’ve revamped any type of cleaning products in their house. They’ve got the chemicals out, they ditch the plastic Tupperware’s. So all that stuff your adding 5%, 10%, 15% and then it just keeps adding up and then eventually, people are gonna feel much, much better.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, absolutely. And I think the bit thing is you’re working on the adrenal piece like I mentioned. You’re also working on the diet, right. Your stabilizing blood sugar. One of the biggest stressors on the hormonal system is going to be blood sugar swings. The more you stabilize those blood sugars and keep that dialed in, you’re gonna takea lot of stress off the hormonal system. Also stress is gonna eat up progesterone. So kinda like the pregnonolone steal, which is you know-it’s theoretical. It makes sense. It’s just- Here’s howI tell patients. We’re prehistorically hardwired to allocate our resources to stress and inflammation now versus healing and recovery in fertility tomorrow. Why? Why is that? Well because if we don’t get through now, tomorrow never comes. So it’s like the 12-year-old boy procrastinating on the homework. If you’re chronically stressed, you keep on putting off the fertility in the recovery, in the- the recuperation that is needed. So we’re chronically hardwired to deal with stress right now. So the goal is to decrease that stress, so then your body can start to allocate that, and put the healing and recovery in the fertility higher up on the priority list.

Evan Brand: Well said. Yeah. And it’s crazy to me how you can go and you could complain of the symptoms up sounds like you’re in or you’re going to menopause.Here’s cream and have a nice day. And none of this other stuff is discussed. I mean, we’re looking at massive pieces of the pie that are just completely ignored.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, yeah. Absolutely I would say the biggest issue I have when I was at the menopause summit last week with the with uh- with Bridget- Bridget Dainer, and one of the things they came off that we talked about was, I would say, one of the biggest things that is driven more menopausal patients to me, is this low-fat era. Avoiding animal proteins and healthy fats because that’s where a lot of your hormones come from. So if you don’t have that diet piece dialed in with the hormonal substrates, and the building blocks, and the healthy amino acids, you’re really at a significant disadvantage to being able to make your hormones on your own. So healthy fat-soluble nutrients, through grass-fed meat and Pasteur-fed meat and Pasteur-fed eggs, organic, free range, none of the chemicals. You don’t wanna add more Zeno estrogens in our meat to the- to the table, right. And throw off our hormones more. Healthy fish, egg yolks, if you can handle grass-fed buttering ghee, that’s great. Lots of vegetables, a glycemic or carbohydrate uh- balanced meal for you. So depending on starch, or no starch.Keeping grains out, keeping inflammatory foods out, keeping toxins out, and stabilizing your blood sugar, or not letting your blood sugar drop and not letting yourself get hungry is gonna be a great starting point for most people.

Evan Brand: Yes, I mean vegetarians, vegans specifically for women at this time, it’s gonna be brutal on them. If you’re vegetarian, vegan and you’re going into this phase in life, it’s gonna be really, really tough on you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It definitely will be now. If you are in that place, you know- I would try to coerce you in- and sell you on the fact that you probably want to eat some of these healthy animal proteins. At least cajole you and maybe some egg yolks, or tiny bit of fish, if I can do that. If I couldn’t do that, I will at least try to get you on some collagen proteins, uh- some really good P-protein. I’d even recommend you get some free form amino acid supplementation. I recommend lots of healthy fats via avocado- avocado oil, coconut oil. I will do Chia seed. Uhm- again, olive oil, low temperature. AndI would really work on the good fats, and I would make sure not going excessively high in the carbs. A lot of vegetarian by default become carbotarians. Again, I got in a lot of flak on this on YouTube, but it’s true. I’ve looked at hundreds of food logs of these types of patients and people. And I’ve seen it over and over again. The difference between me and you Evan, and the general public, is most people in the public, they only have an N=1. They have a torr experience. So if they extrapolate themselves, as is what everyone does, we seen it many, many hundreds, if not thousands of times over, most vegetarians become carbotarians with the grains and the excessive starch. So again, may not be an issue for you. I may not be speaking to you directly, but again that’s an issue that we do find on the vegetarian side.

Evan Brand: Agreed. Yeah. And we can look at the lab results, too. And I notice YouTube is the place where you get the most hate comments about vegetarian or, or- or veganism. If you’re- if you’re saying that that’s not a good- not a good thing to do, but we got the lab results to prove it. So when you got people out there saying look at this person, or look at this one doctor, or look at this one study, it’s like,“Hmm, I’m gonna look at the stuff that we’re doing in the trenches. I mean,  you and I are in the thousands of people that we’ve worked with now. And we see the direct correlation where when people start adding in the eggs, or they start adding in the good fats on a retest of let’s just say, adrenal cortisol pattern, for example. We may notice that the cortisol could get back into a good rhythm. Now granted there’s lifestyle components that were helping, there’s- there’s stress management, there’s the sleep, there’s the watching off of the blue light, etc. Getting good bright light in the morning, which is gonna be helpful. If you’re spending time in a dark room, cortisol is a light driven hormone, so if you’re waking up and you’re not opening the blinds, that’s a big issue, too. Wearing sunglasses, for example, but if your adrenals are stressed, you’re gonna want to wear sunglasses.  Some women they’re complaining of a bright light coming in, you definitely wanna get your adrenals tested. Because I’ve noticed that people I suspect- like I look around my family to see,  “Oh, I bet she’s got some adrenal issues”,“she’s always wearin’ those sunglasses”. That gets better when we support the adrenals. Bright lights don’t bother you as much.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. That’s a 100% true. I totally agree. Well, anything else we want to touch upon with menopause. We hit the adrenals. We hit the diet. We hit the blood sugar. We hit some of the supplementation. Again, some womendon’t necessarily need the bioidenticals, but some women do. And it really depends on what’s going on, how unbalanced the hormones are, and how bad their symptoms are. Again, the more their hormones are depleted, you may need a strong bailout, a fast bailout with a little bit of hormone support. So I don’t wanna keep my female patient suffering. So we’ll use a little bit of that. And as long as we’re testing, and were not guessing, were assessing, I feel very confident moving forward  with that.

Evan Brand: Agreed. Yeah. Well said. Well people let us know what you think of the live YouTube thing. I’ll be curious to hear the audio quality. I mean, you talking to me it sounds- it sounds perfect. So if it’s as good as us recording through Skype, and other methods, then I say we could just keep doing our shows like this.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:And again, we didn’t plan uhm- to do this show today. So I did one this morning off the cuff. I posted last night. So we had more viewers, but today was off the cuff so we don’t have too many viewers listening. But if anyone’s listening and wants to ask any questions, let us know. But I plan on- we’ll probably have hundreds, if not thousands, of people listening live very soon. When we start planning these out and it we’ll put it out in our emails. We’ll put on Facebook ahead of time so people know and they can come with your questions. Bzut anyone has any questions, actually we got a question here.What about liver health? And where to metabolize estrogens? Yeah. So regarding estrogen metabolism, this is important because I mentioned this earlier. We had E1, which is estrone and we have E2, which estradiol gets funneled downstream into estriol, okay. And what happened- this conversion happens to be at the liver. So E1 to E3 and E2 to E3, all happens in the liver. So anyone that has a liver issue, is gonna have a female hormone estrogen issue. So we wanna work on the liver. And also on the Dutch testing, we’ll look at the 2- hydroxyl, the 2-methoxy estrogen metabolism and we’ll look at the methylation meter and see if we’re having that one-to-one ratio of estrogen metabolism. So for 2-hydroxy estrogen of 1, do we have a 2- methoxy 1? Do we have this one-to-one metabolism? And that’s the methylation meter that we’re looking at on the test. If not, we could be uhm- essentially not getting rid of all the ashen. We could be re-absorbing that. Also, increase estrogen issues are gonna cause gallbladder issues. So again, you know- that the FFF role gallbladder issues, women that are overweight or fat, women that are- that’s the FFF, that’s just the accrued abbreviation. So overweight female, and 40 or up. So that this estrogen dominance thing. This is what goes, you list- I mean- I remember sitting in the many gallbladder surgeries, and those like FFF. Those are the three things the surgery would say. Are your overweight, female and over 40? Because the high amount of estrogen dominance, right. Makes the gallbladder- makes the bile flow from the gallbladder sluggish. So then what happens is two things. You can’t metabolize your hormones. A lot of that happens via the bile excretion. And then number two, you lose the ability to break down your uhm- fat-soluble vitamins. So gallbladder issues, and then fat metabolism, and then detox are common side effect of estrogen dominance. And that can happen leading into menopause. I can’t tell you how many of my female patient that are cycling have lost her gallbladder. And it really sets them up for nutritional efficiency and poor detoxification down the road.

Evan Brand: Oh, gosh. Well said. I mean- when I hear liver too, I just think of, like the GPL talks that you and I’ve chatted about with the gasoline additives and all these other chemicals in people’s bodies, aspirin and other- you know, pharmaceutical medications that increase the burden on the liver. So whether it was like statins, or hard drugs, or any of the stuff that that’s really tough on the liver. Alcohol, which a lot of women over 40, their stressed, they’ve got these symptoms, so they’re using wine you know, to put themselves to sleep. A glass or two a night which could increase the burden on the liver and messed this whole process up. Plus we’ve got parasite infections. You know 1 in 3 is what we’re seeing of infected people. Say you’ve got the toxic load there. And then if you got methylation issues, like you’ve mentioned, and you’re unable to detoxify, or you’ve got problems with the phase I or the phase 2. And you’re not taking something to conjugate those toxins and rattle them up and get them out your toes. So there’s a lot of different pieces that- that can be improved upon, for sure. Sço we always factor liver in. It’s not a matter of if we factor liver and detox into the protocol, it’s just a matter of when.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Absolutely. Now we just say- making sure we- you toss upon earlier with the gut stuff and I think so many mainstream functional medicine practitioners, and I would say even the medical doctors, ignore the digestion part coz again, a lot of the detoxification happens with sulfur amino acids. So we have to make sure we have the sulfur amino acids, the phase 2 sulfur amino acids to run those liver pathway. Socysteine, glutamine, glycine, and the glutathione precursors uh- methionine, taurine, especially for the gallbladder, are gonna be super helpful for liver detox. Also making sure we eat a lot of the cruciferous vegetables. And again, if you have gut issues, make sure they’re cooked so the fiber’s broken down. So we can get the diindoylmethane and indole-3-carbinol, which is gonna be really important for estrogen detox. And again, this is your broccoli, your brussel sprouts,your cauliflower, your asparagus, your kale, spinach

Evan Brand: And your broccoli sprouts. I love broccoli sprouts.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Yes, broccoli sprouts. And again we have someone answering uh- or asking this question live. So we’re answering anyone else that wants to ask a question live. We’re both ready to sign out. So anyone else,uh- put something in the chat window, we love the answer to it. So to finish that question, what other herbs can we give? So for gallbladder, we wanna add maybe some extra bile salts. We wanna do some fringe trees, some artichoke roots, and phosphatidylcholine, some X taurine. These are great for the liver. Extra milk thistle, silymarin. These are great things and we may even give extra sulfur amino acids, antioxidants, B vitamins, extra folate. These are all great things to support the liver. And I’d also say make sure you’re not doing all the bad things regarding the pesticides, the chemical, the exogenous hormones. And again, this is where a little bit estriol may need to be given coz that if we have toxic liver, we may not be able to have that liver conversion goin’.

Evan Brand: Well said. Great job.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Excellent. And we have a couple of other questions here. Uh- No, I did not go to the Super Bowl. No, not this year. It’s in Houston. I was thinking about it, didn’t make it down there. But I’m a huge Tom Brady fan. I think I know a lot of haters for that. But Tom Brady is the poster child for functional medicine, natural medicine. And the guy’s 40 years old and better shape than ever. And part of it is because of his diet,his eating,his sleeping, his training he sees a chiropractor, he sees an acupuncturist. The guy’s dialled in and is using natural medicine and functional medicine as his go to and not conventional medicine for his go to. So,huge fan of that. Anything else here, Evan?

Evan Brand: I don’t think so. Some people back to the website, check out Justin,  justinhealth.com Check me out notjustpaleo.com or type in Evan Brand. You’ll find us both. More content, more info, the ability to schedule consults with us. All of that’s there. So we do both offer 15-minute free call. So if you got questions, you wanna get your questions answered, reach out. You know, there’s no sense in suffering if you know that there’s a possibility to get better, go for it, time’s wastin’.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: And if you guys listening, like this type of format, we want to do it more frequently. So give us- give us some love,give us the thumbs up. Uh- share it, put it on Facebook, email to your friends. We absolutely love it. And the more feedback we have, the more we wanna do this.

Evan Brand: Absolutely.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Excellent. Alright, Evan. Well this- the beautiful thing about this is,this thing goes live right away.So kinda exciting, instantaneous feedback for the listeners. Anything else in your end?

Evan Brand: No man, that’s it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Alright, man. Great chattin’.

Evan Brand: You too.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Take Care.

Evan Brand: Bye.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani: Bye.


Reference:

notjustpaleo.com

Natural Birth Control Options – Prevent Pregnancy Naturally

Natural Pregnancy

By Dr. Justin Marchegiani

Learn all about the different methods and approaches to preventing pregnancy naturally. Gain information about the ovulation cycle of women and how it is affected by different methods such as the rhythm method, barrier method which includes use of condoms, cervical cap, IUD, and the chemical method which is by use of the birth control pill. Find out about the pros and cons of each and combination of approaches and determine which one works for you.


I have lots of female patients that are inquiring about this. Also their male counterparts who is trying to figure out ways that they can prevent pregnancy without having a whole bunch of synthetic hormones in the body. So we have the conventional approach, which we’ll talk about today and we’ll also compare that some of the natural approaches and figure out what works best for you. At least give you the options that you can make a better decision.

Three Methods to Prevent Pregnancy:

1. Rhythm method (time-based)

2. Barrier methods (condoms, cervical caps, diaphragms and IUDs)

3. Chemical methods (birth control pills)

RHYTHM METHOD

Rhythm Method

Whether they’re a synthetic estrogen or progesterone-based, we’re going to go through this one by one. So off the bat, we have the rhythm method. First thing with the rhythm method is you have to know what your cycle is like.

Ovulation

A typical cycle is going to be about 28 days long, on average. If we draw this out, 28 to 0, that gives you a good frame of reference. And we’re going to use the red for the estrogen. The first half of the cycle you’re going to see, estrogen kind of pop-up a bit. Then it drops off the last half of the cycle, like so.

Progesterone is going to be blue here. You’re going to see progesterone comes up, right about here in the middle of the cycle and then falls off here at the end. So you could see here, first part of the cycle right here- the start, this part here is going to be the follicular phase- put an f and x to it. And this part over here will be the luteal phase.

Estrogen predominates in the first half. Progesterone predominates in the second half- really important. Now ovulation, the primary in which pregnancy can occur, is going to happen right here, right in the middle. This is the money right here. That’s the money shot. And that’s where the sperm and the egg have to meet at the same time. And that’s going to be where that happens.

Fertility

So knowing that, what we do based on that information? If we have about 2 to 3 day window here, so about 2-3 days here, and we know sperm can live about 5 days – 5 to 7, essentially. We have a 5 to 7, plus three-day window here. Essentially, we got about 10 days a month a woman could potentially be fertile if sex happens beforehand. Because if ovulation’s already happened, it wouldn’t matter if sperm came in here because the hormonal timing is now passed. But If we have sperm in here ahead of time, they could easily get in, fertilize that egg. And a baby would be on its way, so to speak.

We have about 10 days of fertility a month – 10 days. And again, it really takes someone knowing their cycle. I recommend a female having at least six cycles, whether within at least a day or two. So they kind of know where that ovulation is.

Three things to note when using the rhythm method:

  1. Drop in temperature
  2. Increase in temperature following the drop
  3. Increase in cervical mucus production

A couple things you can do to figure that out is a great app called Kindara on the iPhone. And the first thing that you can do, is you can track your temperatures first thing in the morning. You will first notice a drop in temperature. And second thing you’re going to know that you’re already into ovulation, is you’re going to notice an increase in temperature following the drop.

So it’s the drop first. The increase, second. And this kind of means you’re already in the middle of ovulation here. We’re already ovulating here. And the last thing would be also noticing some cervical mucus, kind of like an egg yolk kind of consistency. So those will be the three categories that you would use while you’re in your cycle to kind of confirm that you’re moving along in the right direction. You can also do an ovulation test which measures luteinizing hormone. It’s part of the brain signaling that increases progesterone which is part of that increase in temperature there.

When to use the rhythm method

You can do the rhythm method and use it to avoid sex during this time frame here to here. The big thing is you have to make sure you don’t come in too soon after. So typically, day 10 to day 20, or day 8-18 is pretty safe. And if you’re on the fence, you can use a condom and/or various barrier methods if you’re within a day or two and you’re kind of uncertain about it. Barrier methods or as we said the rhythm method works about 88% of the time. So just be very mindful. It’s not perfect. If your cycle is inconsistent or you’re more on the unhealthy size from a hormone perspective, you may want to look at combining a condom or barrier method along with that. That’s the rhythm method there.

CLICK HERE to ask a functional medicine doctor about birth control

THE BARRIER METHOD

The Barrier Method

So with the barrier method, we have a couple standard ones here. You have your condom, which will protect you from STD’s as well.  Well that’s a male counterpart, right there. The others will be all female counterparts.

There’s a pill that we’re using. It’s not quite out yet, but it’s decreasing FSH for men which then creates spermatogenesis downstream.  I’m not sure how much I feel about that yet. Not an update on it, but  it’s something. It’s coming out – the male version of the pill.

Condoms

So condoms are going to be the first one. Again, this will actually protect against STD, which is good. The others won’t.

Cervical Cap / Diaphragm

You’re going to have your cervical cap / diaphragm, kind of similar. And that’s just the barrier. Basically, it’s blocking the cervix where the sperm would come in from the cervix into the uterine lining or into the uterus. It basically caps that off and blocks it. So you have the cervical cap and the diaphragm.

IUD

It basically sits in the uterus here and prevents the egg from implanting. That’s how the idea works. It is effective of disrupting implantation of the egg, so the egg can’t come in there and stick. We have barriers: condom, cervical cap, diaphragm, IUD. So couple things here. This is going to be something the guy can use. Also protects the STD’s there, too.

Advantages and Disadvantages of the barrier method

Cervical cap and diaphragm are great because they can be combined with the condoms. So you have a barrier method on the male side, a barrier method on the female side, which provides really good, extra coverage. The only thing is you got to put all these things in. You can’t let these things stick. You got to put them on before sexual intercourse or foreplay. So you’re going to know to do that ahead of time. 1-2-3.

The IUD is nice because it’s always there. So you don’t have to plan it ahead of time. The main one that we recommend would be the Paragard IUD. That’s going to be a copper based IUD. You have to worry about some copper issue with that. But, I mean it’s not going to be the Marina which is the progesterone, synthetic progesterone IUD. So it’ll be a copper IUD and it’s always going to be there. Some women, it can create bleeding issues. You got to figure out if it’s right for you or not. You may want to try it and see if it works well from a symptomatic standpoint, but that’s always going to be in there.

Combining IUD and Condoms

A lot of times you can do an IUD, you can combine with condoms or if you don’t want to do the IUD because of side effects or you’re worried about the copper issues, you can combine the barrier method with the condom method and then you got a really good shot. And you can also just do the condom method. That’s still going to be good, 90%+ of the time. If  you combine them, obviously you get even better coverage. That gives you the barrier method there. So you have the rhythm, and again you can use all these and combine them with the rhythm method during that 10-day time frame at your hormonally sensitive for ovulation and for fertility and pregnancy. So these can be combined with the rhythm method.

THE CHEMICAL METHOD

The Chemical Method

So with the chemical method, let’s talk about the birth control pill. The birth control pill, in general, works by inhibiting ovulation by decreasing feedback loops in the brain. So real quick, we have our brain. And we have from the brain, we have our hypothalamus and our pituitary, and that produces a compound down here. We have FSH on one side and LH on the other side and that talks to the gonads. This case, that’s the ovaries. The males, it’s that the testes. So these various feedback loops here. And LH and FSH are really important.

Luteineizing Hormone (LH) and Follicle Stimulating Hormone (FSH)

The LH in a female helps to increase progesterone levels which are responsible for cervical mucus. And FSH helps grows the follicle and also helps thicken the endometrial lining so the egg can implant. So does the LH as well. If we decrease these, we decrease them by taking the birth control pill.  It’s going to increase more cervical mucus before ovulation, so it makes it harder for the egg to get in there. That’s going to be the synthetic progesterones. And then the FSH is going to make the endometrial lining thinner.  The endometrial lining will get thinner with the FSH being lower and the cervical mucus will get thicker with the LH being lower. Synthetic progesterone will increase cervical mucus. These synthetic estrogen will actually thin out the uterine lining and have effects.

So number one, it’s going to be harder for the egg to get into the uterus. Number two, it’s going to be harder for the egg to implant into the uterine lining because deep lining will be thinner. And that’s the general idea for the most part, a woman’s going to be be taking 21 days of pills.

Types of pills

Typically,  it may be a combo of estrogens and progesterone and synthetic ones. So not estrogen, but synthetic estrogens and not just progesterone, but synthetic progesterone. Maybe a combo a lot of times, it’s going to be a ethanyl-estradiol like a Yasmine kind of thing. Or it may be a combo that has synthetic estrogen and progesterone.

Sometimes if there’s side effects, though, we’ll give women progestins throughout the month as well. Those got to be taken exactly at the exact time everyday. Less flexibility with those than the regular ones. But again, 21 days typically of pills, followed by seven days of reminder pills, which are basically just dummy pill, so your hormone levels can drop. Because it’s the drop in hormones that signals the uterine lining to shed and does it all again.

Summary

Again, birthcontrol pills- what is it doing? High amount of estrogen and progesterone. The high amount of estrogen and progesterone drops the LH and the FSH. And when that’s dropped, what happens is, thicker cervical mucus cap, sperm can get up there- that’s from the LH. We  have a thinner uterine lining from the FSH and the estrogen’s behind which makes it hard for the egg to stick.

Some side effects of the pill

Pills can increase sex hormone binding globulin, which can actually decrease your testosterone levels. So common side effect is a lower testosterone, so lower libido.

It can also increase thyro-binding globulin, which can lower your free fraction of thyroid hormone, which can cause weight gain.

So we have decreased energy, decreased libido, and waking- the side effects there. Not to mention nutritional deficiencies ranging from B vitamins, to folate, to methylation, the calcium, magnesium and zinc. There’s a whole bunch of other things going on.

Recommendation

We always try to go with the most natural route possible. And I always try to suggest these things above, the barrier rhythm methods because or a combo because of their safety record.

Pills and Cancer

Again, the pill- not a fan of the synthetic hormones. Just not a fan of it. I mean, the pill has been shown to help reduce uterine cancer and ovarian cancer and thyroid cancer, but it’s been shown to increase breast cancer. And breast cancer is a far bigger killer than the first three. So you got to keep that in mind. Plus, we’re bombarded with estrogens – synthetic estrogens in our environment all the time, and we’re in this. Most females are in a constant state in various testings we do. They’re in a constant sate of estrogen dominance whether estrogen is so high in relationship to the natural estrogen-progesterone balance. And they are predisposed to fibrocystic breast conditions endometriosis, fibroids, ovarian cysts. Mainly because of the hormones being out of balance.

Pills and Symptoms

Now a lot of people are being prescribed birth control pills off-label. So they’re being prescribed because of hirsutism or hair issues on their face, or excessive bleeding, or migraine headaches, or mood issues, or PMS. And a lot of times, the pill is not really getting to the root cause.

If your hormones during your cycle go high and low, then high-low again, then drop, it will cause symptoms. The perturbations or up-and-down fluctuations are going to create symptoms, mood issues, migraine, headaches. If it falls out early, and you have 5-7 day gap, this can drive PMS, back pain, cramping, breast tenderness, moodiness, depression.

So again, is it really fixing the underlying issue? Because all it’s doing is taking your estrogen and doing this. It’s raising a flat line, then you hit your reminder pills, and then basically goes right down. So you’re just basically raising your estrogen levels super, super high and then you’re taking your 7-days reminder pills, and it drops. So all it’s doing is, instead of the up-and-downs here, it’s covering all the deficiencies up by giving you a flat line hormone.

Again, birth control pill’s been around for 50 years or so. Some side effects are present. Pretty easy, easier than most above, so you got to figure out what works best for you. Whether you rather have a little bit more inconvenience, but less synthetic hormones; or a little more convenience for potential side effects. So you got to weigh out pros and cons.


If you’re trying to deal with hormonal issues, PNS issues and/or your hormone’s back on track, click on screen. Reach out to myself so you can get more info on how you can get your hormones back in action. Again, this is Dr. J here. Click on screen, subscribe for more videos coming your way.

Need help with your hormonal issues? CLICK HERE to ask a functional medicine expert about it.

The Top 5 Birth Control Pill Side Effects – Functional medicine options

Birth Control PillsBy Dr. Justin Marchegiani

Birth control pills can have many side effects. Many times birth control pills are prescribed for reasons outside of just avoiding pregnancy. Many times birth control pills are prescribed for acne, migraines, excessive menstruation and PMS symptoms.

The problem with this type of approach is it doesn’t fix the root cause of why those symptoms are there in the first place. At some point, these old symptoms will reveal themselves again and maybe worse than they were originally.

Today’s video is going to be on birth control pills and their side effects. We’re going to break down their mechanism, how they work and the potential side effects and just things that you can do naturally to get to the root cause.

Birth Control Pills

Birth Control Pills

The conventional alternative if you’re trying to prevent pregnancy is typically the chemical modality or the chemical pharmaceutical option, which is a birth control pill.

There are couple of different kinds that are out there.You have the shots, you have the ones where they insert little things under your skin, little pellets under your skin. And then you also have the typical birth control pill that you swallow. You also have IUDs, too, that are more physical deflectants of birth control pill but you have the Marina, which is a synthetic progesterone IUD that goes through and prevents pregnancy.

Outside of that, you have your birth control pill, you typically have your synthetic estrogen, like your Ethinylestradiol, like the Yaz for instance, and then you have your combinations like Yaz, which is an Ethinylestradiol and the Drospirenone. And then you have your regular estrogen-based birth control pills which are the Ethinylestradiol like the NuvaRing, etc.

The most prescribed medications out there are going to be your birth control pills, typically the combo, or the estrogen only. And sometimes you’ll even see synthetic progesterone ones that are done if you kept side effects with the combo progesterone and estrogen versions.

If you have those issues, if you’re trying to prevent pregnancy, that’s the typical avenue.

Are you on a birth control pill but would like more natural options? Click here to consult a functional medicine expert!

Other Uses of Birth Control Pills

Uses Of Birth Control Pills

Birth control pills are also prescribed for other side effects like acne or mood issues like in your period, migraine headaches, excessive menstruation, and a lot of those issues are driven by other physiological imbalances. So if you have breast tenderness or PMS symptoms (moodiness, back pain, breast tenderness, headaches), typically that’s going to be caused by fluctuations in estrogen and progesterone especially in the last half of your cycle. That will be about one to two weeks before you menstruate when you start seeing imbalances.

How Do Birth Control Pills Work?

Effects of Birth Control Pills

Lets talk about the organs involved when taking birth control pill. We have your cervix, vagina and uterus. So this is your vaginal area. Obviously what’s going to happen? You take a birth control pill, a few things are going to happen.

Decrease in FSH and LH

These are your pituitary hormones that talk to the ovaries to make progesterone and estrogen. When you’re taking a birth control pill, essentially you’re telling your brain that you’re pregnant. That’s why these hormones start to drop. When these hormones drop, they stopped talking to the ovaries to make estrogen and progesterone. So typically, FSH is going to then talk to the egg here and stop that egg from growing if it’s low. It’s going to stimulate the egg grow if it’s high. So the FSH is low, that egg is not going to grow. So the egg here won’t grow and then with the FSH being low and the LH being low, what tends to happen is you get a thickening of the cervical cap so it’s harder for sperm to make their way in to the uterine lining, and typically with a birth control pill, with natural cycle, estrogen start to come up in the first half of the cycle and that starts to thicken the uterine lining.

But when you’re taking like a Yaz pill for instance that has the synthetic progesterone, the Drospirenone, that actually thins out the uterine lining. It thins it out and makes it thinner, so it makes it harder for an egg if it is released to actually stick into the uterine lining. It makes it harder to stick.

Mechanisms Involved

Number one, it’s inhibiting ovulation by decreasing FSH and LH. That’s the first linchpin. If mechanism two and three doesn’t work and that works, we’re fine. But let’s say an egg, for some reason, does slip out. Let’s say the FSH and LH wasn’t quite low enough. Well, then maybe the egg pops out but maybe it’s still harder for the sperm to get in. So maybe number two prevents pregnancy from happening, and maybe number three, let’s say the sperm does make its way in past number two, and that’s when number two fails, maybe the egg can actually still bind into the uterine lining. But if it’s thinner, it’s going to be much harder for it to bind in.

So kind of recapping here, birth control pill works a couple different ways:

  1. Inhibiting ovulation.
  2. Preventing sperm from getting into the uterus area to begin with.
  3. Preventing the sperm and the egg from sticking into the uterine lining and fertilizing.

Women’s Menstrual Cycles

We typically have the first half of the cycle predominated by estrogen. So estrogen is up like this in the first half of the cycle; then we have progesterone that predominates the second half of the cycle. And you can see what happens is progesterone rises and falls and estrogen rises and falls right at the end of the cycle which triggers menses.  And then we have the part here in the middle of the cycle where ovulation happens and that’s where pregnancy can occur.

Effect of Pill on the Cycle

So basically what’s happening with the birth control pill is these hormones aren’t going to fluctuate because the LH and the FSH is dropped. Because the LH and the FSH is dropped, we’re not going to have that nice, natural rhythm of hormone because essentially our brains think we’re pregnant. That’s the general gist there.

What the birth control pill is doing is, instead of there being drops in progesterone level, we are now getting a high amount of progesterone and estrogen above where we’re supposed to be at. And so, we now have a flat line. Instead of having those perturbations, now it’s flat and smooth. And then typically around Day 21 and 22, we take those five to seven days of reminder pills which then allows the hormones to drop like so and that allows menstruation to happen. With progesterone only pill, that may not happen; but on an estrogen or estrogen-progesterone combo, that’s what’s going to happen. So that gives you the general physiological mechanism of how all this stuff is working.

Side Effects of Birth Control Pills
Birth Control Pills Side Effects

Depression

With the birth control pill, we may have more depression. It may affect your mood and it’s one of the most common side effects of the birth control pill because you’re affecting hormones. Hormones are intimately connected to our moods. So if you’re taking hormones and bringing them above a physiological or bringing them to a super physiological level, it may affect our moods.

Infections

Again, candida and fungal overgrowth. Because the birth control pills affect the pH in the vaginal tract, it makes it a little bit alkaline so it actually raises that pH a little bit.  When the pH is more alkaline above 7, that makes it more inhabitable for yeast and bacteria to grow. So when you’re stressed and when you’re on birth control pills, increased chance of a UTI or a fungal infection and then guess what happens? You’re given antibiotics and then what happens again? You’re at an increased chance for a rebound overgrowth. So you can see how one thing kind of increases your chance of intervention that drives other symptoms down the road.

Nutritional deficiencies

Birth control pills are notorious for creating B vitamin deficiencies, folate, B9, B12, B1, thiamine, riboflavin, niacin. All these are important. B vitamins, vitamin C vitamin E, zinc, magnesium, selenium are really important for your thyroid as well. So you can see these nutrients are going to be depleted with the birth control pill. You have to be mindful that if you’re going to use the pill, you have to make sure you’re taking high-quality multivitamin. That will replete some of these missing nutrients as well as a healthy diet on top of that.

Decreased libido

Because your birth control pill is increasing sex hormone-binding globulin, that’s going to bind up testosterone. So if here’s your testosterone compound like this, what it’s going to do is it’s going to bind the protein to it. So here’s the protein and it’s called sex hormone-binding globulin and that makes it harder for that testosterone to bind into the receptor site. Here’s the receptor site over here and because the purple guy is attached to it, it won’t quite fit. So that protein there renders your testosterone or your sex hormones to be a little bit lower functionally. So guess what happens? Libido goes downhill and also because the testosterone drops a little bit, guess what happens to women’s skin on the birth control pill? It tends to get a little better.

That’s why the birth control pill is prescribed off-label for mood. It can be prescribed for mood in the cycle because it at least levels out the hormones, so it may make it more level. A lot of women report more mood issues.

Weight Gain

This is kind of a controversial one. A lot of places say birth control does not affect weight gain at all but if you look at the side effects on the bottle or on the drug, it’s going to say weight gain. Now some of the mechanisms of that are estrogen, synthetic estrogen increases insulin resistance. So it causes the insulin in your body to make to have to make more of it because the cells are getting numb to the insulin. You go ding dong, ditch your neighbor, after a couple times they stop opening the door. Maybe after one time if they’re smart.

So that’s kind of what happens with insulin. Your body starts to make some of it, and then it’s saying false alarm, and then stops bringing the blood sugar in. So then you need more insulin which causes the fat cells to grow. Insulin is a storage hormone and causes fat cells to grow.

Thryoid Issues

Also sex hormone-binding globulin and thyroglobulin are increased. So thyroglobulin is another hormone where in my analogy over here with testosterone. This is going to be the thyroid hormone. So the T for testosterone, we have TH for thyroid, and then we have the P over here, this is the protein. This is thyrobinding globulin which is a protein compound and that’s going to make it hard for that thyroid hormone to bind into the receptor site over here, so it makes the free fraction, the bioavailable thyroid hormone to actually decrease. So we actually have less the thyroid from a functional standpoint.

Increased risk of Cancer

Birth control pills may increase cervical cancer 300%, 3 times, and increase breast cancer 2 times. This is a new study that came out in August of this year. Previous studies have said it decreases cervical cancer and ovarian cancer, but increases breast cancer. Now some other studies are showing the opposite. We’re saying breast cancer is 2 times higher; but now we’re saying cervical cancer may even be 3 times higher. And that’s from an Iranian study.

Recommendation

Fix the root cause. If you’re taking a birth control pill because you’re trying to prevent pregnancy. Fine, I get that. It totally makes sense. Take a look at the natural birth control pill video if you want to avoid the synthetic hormones and some of the potential side effects, I recommend using that.

We don’t want any unwanted pregnancy, so that’s your only option that you’re willing to do, or that you can be compliant with. Fine, I get it. It’s there for you. Make your choice. I just want you to be informed so you know the potential side effects. Also, you know the other natural options by watching my other natural birth control pill video options. We’ll put on screen so you can access.

And if you’re having these other symptoms like depression, or mood issues, or excessive bleeding, or you’re having weight gain, or skin issues, let’s say as an off-label prescription for the birth control pill, well, you really want to get to the root cause with functional medicine. This invovles getting the adrenals, getting your hormones, and getting your cycle looked at and balanced out.

To find out more about more natural ways to prevent pregnancy, ask a functional medicine expert HERE!

If you’re trying to get your hormones balanced, or trying to get yourself back on track hormonally from some of the side effects of being on birth control pill, or trying to avoid it, click on screen, subscribe. You can always schedule a consult with myself.

Putting together the optimal functional medicine program – Podcast #116

Dr. Justin Marchegiani and Evan Brand discuss about effective functional medicine programs and how they create and follow protocols. This interview goes in-depth about the world of functional medicine practice.

functional medicine programsFind out why you shouldn’t wait for something to happen before doing anything about it health-wise. Discover the differences between Body System One and Two and how optimal health can be attained. Learn about the various tests you can take and the right tools that are available to further achieve better and more effective results with functional medicine.

In this episode, topics include:

01:26   Get help as early as possible

07:00   Body System One

10:19   Diet and lifestyle

17:16   Body System Two

38:22   Tests

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youtuve

 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Hey, Evan, it’s Dr. J in the flesh. How we doin’ this Monday?

Evan Brand:  Hey, man! I’m doing great. How are you?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I’m doing great. Can’t complain. It’s a little rainy Monday here in Austin. The grass is getting plenty of water which is great. I got the fireplace on behind me, so it’s got that wintery Christmas feel a little bit.

Evan Brand:  Nice. Excellent.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Can’t complain. How about you?

Evan Brand:  Doing well, man. Hey, we were trying to record this thing, and then we had choppy audio so I wanna repeat what my little rant was because I thought that was important. I’m always curious about what is the catalyst for someone to work with yourself or myself, and I had a lady this morning who had been listening to us for six months and she knew that she had problems. She had a lot of gut issues going on but she continued to just listen to try to fix herself, and then she got the diagnosis of alopecia and now she’s lost over half the hair on her head, and now she’s figured out that that’s the time to come and get help. And I just want that to be a fire under people’s butts listening that you shouldn’t wait until things are so bad that you’re at rock bottom before you get help and unfortunately, that’s the conventional system that we’ve all been brainwashed to do which is we wait until we’re really bad, we absolutely need a doctor or practitioner and then we go get help. And my advice, get help now. If you have symptoms and things are off, and this is something you’ve—you’ve trained me on so much. It’s like, “Evan, look, these issues are not gonna resolve themselves. You have to resolve issues now. They’re not just gonna magically disappear.” Did you wanna speak on that a little bit about people just waiting too long or people just not having enough reason so they think to get help?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, well, there was an interesting scenario just the recently. There was a plumber in my house a few months back and he was doing some work, and there was just like a leak on the faucet, and for some reason the leak went away the next day. So there were two plumbers there and he goes down and looks, and he couldn’t find the leak. And he goes, “Well, maybe it just went away,” and then his partner, the plumber next to him spoke up and said, “You know what? Leaks never go away on their own. If there’s a leak, it’s gonna get worse.” So he went down there and he looked, and he said, “Okay, well, we just need more flow and if you had more flow coming, it would start to leak.” And he looked a little deeper back and he found the leak and just the environment wasn’t quite right enough for the leak to be expressing itself but the whole idea was that these problems don’t ever tend to go away by themselves. So that was kind of the moral of the story and connecting it to your patient, let’s say if you have these symptoms, they’re gonna get worse and the question is, how long do you wanna wait until those symptoms, right? Pain, pay attention inside now—that’s what symptoms are—whether it’s aesthetic, whether it’s inflammatory, whether it’s mood or energy. How bad do they have to get before you start getting a—a fire under your butt so to speak.

Evan Brand:  Right. Well, and my grandparents, their old house, you know, they had issues with their plumbing and they had to wait until their entire basement was flooded and thousands and thousands of dollars’ worth of carpet and furniture was ruined due to the flood before they came in and got the issue. So maybe they saved, you know, a couple hundred bucks in the beginning, but then it cost them likely $10,000 or more in the long run because they waited until things just hit an absolute worst-case scenario. So you know, I know there’s a lot of people out there listening that are trying to fix themselves and you and I certainly applaud that. I mean that’s what this is all about, right? Taking your health into your own hands and us teaching you how to fish, but at a certain level, you really just have to reach out and—and don’t be afraid to get better and—and don’t be afraid. You know, we’re real people. We don’t bite and we’re here for you. That’s what this is for. The show is to inspire you and to help you, but there’s nothing that’s gonna replace a one-on-one, you know, with one of us because there’s so many courses and online things, and things that you can look into, but it’s not specialized and I’m against specialization if you only look at one person. But you know, something we’re gonna talk about today is functional medicine is a specialty but we’re breaking that down. We’re—we’re looking at someone. We’re casting a net wide enough to look at every body system, so that we’re gonna figure out what in the world going on with somebody.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  100%. And so the template for how we treat patients is pretty unique for—for us as functional medicine clinicians, right? There a lot of nutritionists out there that will primarily just focus on the diet piece. There are a lot of medical doctors out there that I find that will a lot of time skip the diet, maybe focus on more of the hormones and ignore the gut. You have other people that will only work on infections, whether it’s Lyme or a gut doctor. They’re only focused on the infections. So the question is, how do we become the general or the ultimate general practitioner, where we can pull the key issues from the infections, from the hormones, from the diet, from the lifestyle, from the digestive system, and combine them together and mesh it? So we put it all together in a way that is holistic, that represents the underlying cause from each person, because that underlying cause percentage-wise may be different for each, meaning one person that may be 60% diet, 30% infections, and 10% hormones, and others it may be 30% diet, 50% hormones, 20% gut. So you gotta look at it from the perspective of what piece may be the bigger player, and it may not be the same for each person. So we may not know, but if we hit them all in the order that we consider to be the order of priority, that’s gonna give us the highest chance of hitting all of those key issues and not missing them.

Evan Brand:  Right, and during the free calls, you and I block out just a few hours each month for free calls, which we’re always booked up for those and it’s a true honor to be able to offer that to people.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Absolutely.

Evan Brand:  A lot of people ask us, “Hey, Justin or hey, Evan, you know, can you just tell me right now what tests we’re gonna need to run.” And we can’t because that involves a case review, that involves looking at your history, looking at the fork in the road when did things get bad, how long have things gotten bad, what else was going on at that time in your life in terms of stress and travel and relationships and moving. You know, so there really is no one-size-fits-all program. Now there are similar tests that we run on nearly everyone, but at the end of the day, it’s so case-by-case and I know people wanna just get put into a box because it makes them feel comfortable. I mean, think of like Weight Watchers, right? You know, it’s a point system and you can buy their little hundred-calorie snack packs of pretzels. But that’s a horrible box to be in and you don’t wanna be confined there. So it—it’s a box of functional medicine but it’s a box without boundaries, too, because we never know what toolbox or toolkit we’re gonna need to reach into to pull something out specifically based on—on your symptoms.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  100%. So we wanted kinda get things dialed in, and we have like the pallet of our tests that we may choose from for body system one. That’s like the hormonal system and we break that up into ATF and ATM, adrenals, thyroid and female hormones for our female patients and then our ATM, adrenals, thyroid and male hormones. And depending on how deep we go is depending upon what kind of symptoms present themselves and how long the patient’s been sick. Typically, the longer someone’s been sick, it may be better to get more data so we can fine tune the plan better, more specific to what’s going on. If someone’s been maybe not feeling good for just a little bit of time, maybe only a few years or a few months, we may run less off the bat because we don’t need as much data. Typically, the low hanging fruit tend to work on people that aren’t as chronic. So that’s kind of a good rule of thumb. So our body system one test are gonna typically include high-quality adrenal tests. Well, and that depends. I know we’re going back and forth and testing, you know, the new Biohealth saliva test that’ll be out soon. We’ve been using the Dutch for a bit of time. We have been using the old Biohealth 201. I have lots of patients that come in with other subpar salivary hormone testing that—that come in. We also look at the DHEA sulfate, which is an adrenal marker of sex hormone precursors from the adrenals, DHEA sulfate. And then we’ll also add on female and male hormones to those tests, whether it’s female hormones, progesterone, estrogen, estrogen metabolites, the different kinds of estrogens, estradiol, estrone, estriol, whether we are looking at the DHEA metabolites like androstenedione or etiocholanolone. Those also get factored in, maybe even melatonin as well. So we’ll look at all these different metabolites on the hormone side and then depending on if they’re showing with thyroid symptoms, we may even run a thyroid blood test or we’re looking at all of the thyroid markers, TSH, T4 Free and Total, T3 Free and Total, reverse T3, T3 uptake, and thyroid antibodies. So those are kind of all of the hormonal tests that we may run. And we even have some different. We may even time it up on day 20 of a female cycle if they’re—if they’re menstruating to get a window into where their hormones are tapping out. We may even look at a full month long panel, testing hormones every other day for a full month, so we can get a window of ovulation and the ebb and flow of the hormones throughout the month, just to make sure it’s optimal for fertility.

Evan Brand:  Yup, well said. So body system one. I mean, this is the foundation, you know. You talk about these people that just focus on the gut and we’ve dealt with that. I mean a lot of times and I know you hear this just as much as me if not more, “Oh, I’ve already been to 10 specialists or 20 specialists or 20 doctors. They all think I’m crazy or they said it was just the gut. They gave me antibiotics.” If you don’t get the hormones aligned and checked out, you’re kinda wasting your time really because if you have cortisol issues, you’re likely gonna have leaky gut issues which is gonna leave you susceptible to infections. So it’s like if we come in and just hit the gut, which we’ll talk about in a minute, body system two, it’s not really worth it, right? Because if you get the infection gone, but the leaky gut’s still there due to the cortisol issues, I mean, that’s kind of a bigger top of the food chain issue, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  100% and just backing up one bit, everything sits on a foundation. So the introductory foundation for everything is diet and lifestyle.

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And we’ve talked about this before, but just to make sure we don’t miss it, the foundation is gonna be what you eat, when you eat, the quality of food that you eat, how you sleep, how you move, how you deal with stress, and hydration. So that’s gonna be a really important piece of the puzzle. Making sure we’re eating nutrient-dense, anti-inflammatory, low toxin foods. Making sure the diet is dialed in for you. Now what does that mean for you? Well, if you’re just a little bit sick, maybe you’re kinda in the middle, it’s not too bad, a Paleo template may be good to start with. Alright, no grains, no legumes, no dairy. If we’ve been sick for longer, maybe we have a history of autoimmunity in the family, or there may be known autoimmunity in yourself or known autoimmune symptoms, well, the next step may be an Autoimmune Paleo template where we go to the next step which is cutting out nuts, nightshades, and eggs. And then from there if there’s excessive gut issues, we may look at specific carbohydrate diet where we cut out salicylates and phenols and peel our vegetables and—and make sure everything’s well cooked and mash our foods. We may even look at a GAPS approach where we focus more on bone broth and soups and—and the same type SCD stuff, more in a liquid, palatable—a liquid, more palatable type of form. And we may even go to a low FODMAP diet where we cut out the fermentable carbohydrates–fermentable oligo-di-po—let’s see, fermentable oligo-di-mono and polysaccharides. So it’s your—your fermentable carbohydrates, your fermentable sugars. So we may add that piece onto it just to make sure that we’re taking as much stress off the body. We’re stabilizing blood sugar. We’re not adding toxins from the pesticides and chemicals and GMO and Roundup and—and the glyphosate and we’re stabilizing blood sugar. We’re not skipping meals and we’re making sure that we’re sleeping good at night and we’re hydrating appropriately in between meals or 10 minutes before, so we’re not diluting digestive enzymes and hydrochloric acid.

Evan Brand:  Well said and there’s a ton of overlap in all of those, too. I mean–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  A ton.

Evan Brand:  You’re going to be omitting gluten. You’re gonna be omitting–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yup.

Evan Brand:  Many of the dairy components, the inflammatory component, then you’re going to stay away from pesticides and chemicals. I had a guy the other day. He asked me. He said, “Well, I’m not sensitive to gluten. So do I still have to avoid it?” I said, “Absolutely.” There’s no deficiency of gluten ever and just because you don’t think you’re sensitive to it, some of your skin rashes and all that is probably caused from some type of food intolerance. You know, you don’t have to be doubled over in pain from eating a bagel to—to necess—you know, to necessarily have to stay away from it, right? You don’t have to be falling over, needing a morphine shot due to the pain from gluten if you—if you have anything, any symptom, headaches. I mean I had a lady who had migraines for 20 years and it was amazing how simple it was just to get the diet and the gut cleaned up and the migraines went way. So I think people expect massive, massive symptom sometimes to be caused from gluten and otherwise, they don’t wanna get rid of it but you should just get rid of it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, my thing with grains and gluten is if you’re gonna cheat and you’re gonna do grains, number one, the safest grain for most people tend to be white rice. So that’s tends to be an okay alternative if you’re gonna do a grain, if you’re gonna cheat. White rice tends to be okay. Even better, try doing the safer starch. You know, yucca, plantains, sweet potatoes, let’s see—I said plantains, yucca, sweet potatoes,  squash—those type of safer starches tend to be a better alternative for most. Go ahead.

Evan Brand:  Yeah, I was gonna say taro, too. Some people talk about that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Taro, arrowroot, yeah, and then also if you’re gonna—like let’s say you’re like, “I’m gonna do bread.” Well, sourdough bread has actually shown to have less gluten because of the fermentation process that gliadin protein tend to be more dissolved in the fermentation process. So if you’re gonna go get all glutened out, take a look at the good, better, best side of it, right? Good or best would be abstaining and doing zero grains. Good may be doing like white rice or better—sorry, better maybe doing like white rice or something that’s fully gluten-free. And then third would be, alright, fine. You’re gonna do a gluten bread, well, it’s gonna at least be fermented, i.e. sourdough bread. It’s fermented, so the gluten and the compounds in there that may be more allergenic are decreased. But the other things–

Evan Brand:  Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  That Evan and I still wanna touch upon are the lectins, are the phytates and the oxalates, the mineral disruptors, the protein disruptors, and the high amount of pesticide and Roundup that are on some of these products. So you can at least reduce it by going organic and by going the sourdough method so it’s at least fermented and soaked, so the grains are gonna be more palatable and not have the mineral and enzyme disruptors. But again, better, right? Good, better, best. Best is gonna be at least keeping the grains out. Good or better part is gonna be in between, going like a rice protein and then like, you know, good would be doing the fermented sourdough bread option like I just mentioned.

Evan Brand:  Yeah, and put it this way, it helps me sometimes to understand kind of the ancestral or the planetary perspective on this. These plants and these grains, they don’t want to get eaten–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, yeah.

Evan Brand:  And digested, right? I mean, they want to pass seed on through an animal and then it come out fully digest—or un—you know, undigested, fully undigested, so that that seed can go back into the ground and grow more grass or grain. I mean, that’s the goal with birds and humans, too, if it goes through and it’s not getting digested, the goal is for that seed to be intact enough to grow more plants, and they don’t wanna get eaten.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Evan Brand:  So that—that’s enough reason there that—that makes sense and really help me. But like, “Oh, man. Wow. Okay.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And it’s pretty simple, right? You know, from evolution standpoints our role, I mean, it sounds crude is just to be able to pass on our—our seed to our offspring, right? That’s pretty much it. You know, be able to survive enough so you can procreate and pass on your DNA to your offspring. That’s pretty much it. Now there’s two ways of doing it. There’s having claws and weapons and tools and teeth, so you can prevent getting attacked on or preyed on, right? That’s like the wolf or the fox, or maybe us with our weapons as humans. And then there’s the, “Okay, I’m gonna get eaten, right?” Berries, grains, but there’s gonna be seeds and things that are gonna keep the seed and the DNA intact, so eventually maybe it will go back and be able to grow again and pass on its offspring so it can live again, right? So there’s two methods. It’s either you’re gonna fight now or you’re gonna basically submit but live the fight another day by passing itself back into the soil again so it can grow.

Evan Brand:  Yup, yup. Should we move on to body system two?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, and then last piece that is the foundation with the diet, I’d say is also the emotions. So if there’s a lot of emotional stress, like there’s an active serious relationship issue. You know, not just like hey, you know, you had a fight here or there but you have active relationship problems. Maybe there’s an active divorce issue. Maybe you’re real problem with the child or a family member or maybe a death of a loved one or serious work stress, or stress at your church or where you go to—to have a spiritual connection, or you excessively exercise a ton, right? Those kind of things need to be looked at because they can provide a lot of stress underlying. So we wanna make sure there’s not an active emotional issue because it affects the timeline in which we expect healing to occur. If you’re actively going through a divorce or you’re having serious work issues, we may say hey, our goal is gonna be just to dig out feet in and prevent us from sliding downhill, and we may not be able to gain a whole bunch of ground going uphill.

Evan Brand:  Well said, yeah, and I’ll also mention the electromagnetic fields which I’ve done–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, yes.

Evan Brand:  Countless podcasts on. I had a lady the other day. She heard a podcast about EMF that—that was on the show and she bought a meter online and anything above 1 milligauss, a measure of magnetic field is bad, right? And this lady had 50 milligauss in her bedroom. And so she lives in San Francisco. She didn’t believe it. She called the power company as I told her to do and they came out and they measured, and sure enough, it was about 25 or 30 milligauss. So her meter was pretty inaccurate, but it was accurate enough to detect a problem that warranted further investigation. And even the power company was like, “Well, this is insanely high.” I mean, you’ll see some people that say anything above 3 milligauss of magnetic fields which comes from power lines is—is bad, but either way, 20, 50, that’s insane and so she’s moving immediately and she said she hadn’t slept well for months and kinda like my story that you and I chatted about when I had to move. I was measuring 7 milligauss in my office and I feel like I didn’t sleep. So I mean, that’s another cause of adrenal hormone issues that you and I are discussing and talking about with people because it’s—it’s an invisible smoke, right? If you had glasses that you could wear and see this stuff, everybody would freak out. But it’s invisible. And like my friend Eric Windheim says, “It’s like fighting a ghost.” So you have to measure this stuff and—and mitigate it, and there’s more. We won’t go into more detail today, but just check out EMF in the search bar on the website, and you’ll be able to find, you know, more episodes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Absolutely. So we addressed the foundational pieces, diet, lifestyle, emotional stress, meal timing, nutrient density–

Evan Brand:  Environmental.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Toxins from the chemical. Toxins are essentially—the electromagnetic toxins, right? That’s kinda in that toxin realm.

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  We hit that. We talked about the hormones, ATM, ATF. And then next step is gut function/gut infections. Now typically when we start out with the diet piece, depending on what’s happening symptomatically, if we see a lot of reflux, a lot of bloating, let’s say we have a history of vertical ridging in the nails or we see a lot of undigested food particulate or the stool looks grayer or the stool floats or we have poor hair quality or very dry skin, these are all symptoms that we’re not digesting our food optimally. So to support the diet piece, we may bring some of the digestive support up forward, and bring it into intro phase. What I mean is we may bring in some of the hydrochloric acid, some of the enzymes, some of the bitters, some of the digestive support to help stimulate digestion because we see that as supporting the intro phase. We’re working on digesting foods and making sure that piece is dialed in. So that may have to be brought up forward because it’s—it supports the foundation. That’s number one. Number two is we have to knock out the infections. So as we look at body system two, we really break it down into 5 steps. So number one is remove the bad foods. Number two is replace the enzymes and acids like I mentioned. So that’s the digestive support to make the intro diet piece work better. Number three is repair and repair means repairing the adrenals because we have to make sure that piece is there. because we don’t wanna work on really healing the gut, until we have the hormonal environment dialed in to help reduce inflammation and help heal the gut lining and help improve IgA levels, which is the localized immune system in the digestive tract. We also wanna make sure healing nutrients are present for people that have extra gut inflammation or extra gut irritation. Things like L-glutamine and the healing nutrients, the licorice root, deglycerized licorice root, maybe slippery elm, maybe cat’s claw, maybe some gentle amino acids like L-glutamine, and Jerusalem artichoke, etc. These are healing nutrients that help that gut lining. Number four is the removing of the infections and we’re able to remove the infections most adequately because of the 3 phases before it. Because of the removing the foods, the replacing the enzymes and acids, the repair in the gut lining and the adrenals, now we can come in and we can start working on removing the infections, and the infections are gonna be specific to the stool test we recommend to pick up the infection. So the H. pylori comes back or fungus comes back or various multiple parasites come back, those all need to be specifically addressed with unique protocols for each. And then number five is going to be the re-inoculation with robotics, really receding all of the good seeds after the weeding’s been done. And then number six is gonna be the retesting to make sure one, infections are cleared and two, there are no new infections as last podcast talked about, making sure there are no resistant infections that were burrowed in deeper that are showing their ugly head, and the only exception will be adding probiotics in the repair phase. Because sometimes probiotics can have an anti-inflammatory effect, and depending on how bad the gut is, we may add some probiotics in the ref—the repair phase as well as the reinoculation phase to help support gut healing and inflammation.

Evan Brand:  Well said. I wanna speak just for a minute and see if you wanna add anything to it about the topic of antibiotic use and infections. There’s a lot of hate on the Internet about herbal remedies for infections, you know, whether it’s an M.D. or a naturopath or someone. You know, getting in an argument about saying, “Oh, herbs don’t work. You have to use triple therapy or this antibiotic or this antifungal prescription.” And there’s very, very, very, very few cases where it takes us more than one or two rounds to get rid of an infection using just herbs, no prescription. So could you add something to that conversation, too? I would 95% of patients can address their gut function and their got infections with herbs alone. 5% of the time we may have resistant bugs that we’ve treated, re-test, still there. Treated, retest, still there. Treated, retest, still there. And it’s 2-3 times and we’re not able to knock it out. But I’ve had people go and on the third time, we knock it out. So the antibiotics may be an option for some people. The conventional antibiotics that are typically run like the metronidazole, the Flagyl, which are the most commonly prescribed ones for these infections tend to miss the infection about two-thirds of the time. And then a lot of times the antibiotics prescribed for your typical triple therapy for H. pylori like clarithromycin, amoxicillin, and/or omeprazole like Prilosec, acid-blocking medications, tend to do the same kind of thing. They’ll miss the infections a third half the time.

Evan Brand:  Well, what about this, too? What about creating more resistant strains due to the antibiotics that have been so overused? Which then makes our job a little bit tougher because people have gone through rounds and rounds of this crap and it’s done nothing.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Exactly. That’s the problem is you run the risk of having these antibiotics not work in the time where maybe you really need them, like you get in a car accident or you step on a—a rusty nail or some, some kind of infection that’s more acute and more severe based on the exposure of the microbes. So I’m always about conservative to invasive, right? What’s the most conservative type of care off the bat? It’s always gonna be diet. It’s always gonna be lifestyle. It’s always gonna be using antimicrobial herbal medicines that have been around for literally thousands of years to have a strong safety profile, to have the ability to use them long-term without resistance–

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And also aren’t gonna wipe out a—as many other microbes, any other beneficial microbes the may be present that are helpful for your gut. We won’t wipe those out and create more problems. I can’t tell you how many patients I’ve seen that have been on antibiotics and had devastating side effects, and now we’re treating them from the damage caused by the antibiotics in the beginning. I’ve seen it so many times. Don’t see it with herbs though.

Evan Brand:  I know.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  But I see all the time with antibiotics so I’m always very conservative and we go up in—in gradations on what step one is. Herbs. Step two. Herbs. Step three. Maybe herbs. And then if we’re still having issues, then we go and we lean towards the antibiotics, typically on step three most of the time.

Evan Brand:  Yup, yup. Well said. And just the fact that this has been used, the herbs that we’re talking about. They’re been used for thousands of years before antibiotics were invented. To me that says something about the success rate and the safety. So when people read concerns about herbs. A lot of times the concerns are unwarranted unless you’re talking about mixing herbs with pharmaceuticals, like you know, 5HTP and SSRIs and stuff like that. Yeah, you can get into trouble. But generally, there’s really nothing to be concerned about compared to the tens and if not hundreds of thousands of people dying due to medical error. That’s now the third leading cause of death. Did you know that? Medical error.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Wow.

Evan Brand:  So—so this—this is real. This isn’t something were just saying on our—on our high horse. You know, this is for real. Look at CDC death or medical top causes of death. You’ll see medical error and this is from the proper, you know, or this is the prescribed rather is what I meant to say, the prescribed dose of a medication is still causing third leading cause of death, is medical error.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, I know. I know Barbara Starfield has her prized article in the Journal of the American Medical Association 2000, all on how much medications and surgical procedures done correctly, right? Hey, the surgery was a success but the patient died. Hey, the prescription was—was perfect according to what the patient’s symptomatology was, but the patient had an ulcer and died, right? Just like that happens with ibuprofen 19,000 times a year according to the New England Journal of Medicine. So we know there’s a risk with conventional treatments. So we wanna be as conservative as possible, so we don’t have to go to those type of higher risk procedures.

Evan Brand:  Agreed, agreed. Well said. So yeah, the infections are huge. I mean, Justin and I, we have more podcasts on that talking about our own history with infections. So not only are we in the trenches helping others remove them, but we’re doing it on ourselves, too. So this is—this is a huge piece and has been instrumental for me to get my—my weight back when I’ve lost, you know, 20 pounds of muscle from infections. So this is a real big deal in something that has to be addressed.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Correct, and I think the key thing, too, is we’re not anti-medication.

Evan Brand:  Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  We’re all about using the correct tool at the right time, but also weighing the pros and cons. Like if we’re, you know, we got our tool bag on or our toolbelt on, right? And we have all these different tools in our tool bag, alright? And we look at this screw and it’s the flathead groove in it, so we know I gotta pull my Phillips head out, right? I’m not gonna look at that screw and be like, “Screw this, my dog must not gonna allow me to use this flathead, throw it away and then try to pull it—the Phillips in there and try to work it.” So let’s say it’s a—a flathead groove, I’m not gonna look at flathead screwdriver and throw it away, and say, “I’m gonna try using a Phillips, right?” I’m gonna go and say, “Well, this is the right tool for it. So I’m gonna put it in and I’m gonna use the correct tool based on what’s presenting itself.” That’s like if you get in a car accident, we’re not gonna look at the patient and say, “Great! Let’s just throw you on some turmeric right now and call it a day.”

Evan Brand:  Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  No. We’re gonna say, “Go to the ER. Get the correct test to make sure there are no fractures, no bleeds, no hemorrhaging.” You may even want to be on some higher dose pain meds. You may want to avoid the opiate ones, right? Because of the addiction, but maybe some higher those pain meds acutely just because you’re in severe trauma and pain. And then we’ll get you stabilized and then we’ll get you on a really good routine after. So we look at the right routine. If we see that flathead groove, we’re reaching for the flathead screwdriver. We’re not reaching for the Phillips.

Evan Brand:  Yeah, absolutely. And if you break your arm, yeah, you don’t go take a dose of turmeric and fish oil. I mean, you need to get that checked out and make sure there’s no internal bleeding, etc., etc. So there’s no trophy for—for trying to be a hero and dismissing the acute, incredible trauma medicine that—that is offered. You know, it’s just the things we’re dealing with, their 1, 5, 10, 20, 30-year chronic issues and that’s where functional medicine tends to have far superior success rates. You know, 90+ percent success rates that you and I both have.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Exactly, and some of the things that are talked about regarding antibiotics, and I’ll put some of the research in the show notes, but antibiotics can create oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction. That’s a big issue, so the mitochondria is gonna be the powerhouse of the cell which is gonna help generate ATP which is like the fuel currency for energy, and also creates oxidative stress which is just a way of breaking down your body, right? Oxidation, you leave a rusty nail in the rain, it gets all rust or you leave a nail out in the rain, it gets rusty because of that oxidation process. We have internal rusting. Doesn’t quite show itself like that, a brownish rust, but it happens—it happens internally and that creates a depletion of a lot of your antioxidant reserves. So your body has to use up more vitamin C, use up more vitamin E, use up more nutrients that would typically be used for other healthy functions. So oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction are a side effect of some of these antibiotics use. So we really want to make sure if we’re using them—excuse my frog on my throat—we wanna make sure they are used appropriately for the right situation.

Evan Brand:  Well said. Yeah, and I’ll briefly mention, typically for body system two, we’re gonna be looking at comprehensive stool testing. We’ve discussed that. So whether PCR-based testing or otherwise, and then also the organic acids testing. So you hear us talking, maybe it sounds fancy, mitochondrial issues, amino acid metabolite problems, etc. but we can see and I see it all the time. Vitamin C levels, very, very, very low across the board most time on organic acids which is a urine test that you do at home and then you send that back to the lab and then we go over the results and then stool testing, you’re gonna be able to find infections. You’re gonna go through the protocol and then you’re gonna retest and the infections are gonna be gone. So that’s—that’s it for body system two. Let’s go on to body system three, Justin. So detox, methylation, making sure that people are able to actually do things at the end of the line. Once everything has happened, once a good digestion has happened, you’ve absorbed your minerals, your colon’s helping to produce vitamins for energy, your probiotics are doing the things they should be doing, now it’s time to get the stuff out of the body. We’re hoping the liver is gonna be able to do what it can do. We’re hoping you’re pooping, right? I mean, people buy all these fancy detox powders and teas, but it’s like if you’re not pooping but once a week, that’s a huge issue. That’s a great way to detox, poop and pee. How simple and revolutionary is that?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  100%. Poop, pee, breathing, and sweating. It’s like un—unreal. So looking at a lot of the detox things, certain nutrients are required to detox. So you can see why number three, why detox is put number three. Let’s just break that down so everyone can get the—understand the concept. Again in this show, we’re really committed to being able to teach concepts because if you get the concept, there’s zero memorization involved in it. Once you get the concept, it’s like riding a bike. You get back on—Boom! You never have to go to that learning curve of falling. So what’s the concept? So number one, if we’re poor foods and eating toxic foods, and foods that are nutritionally poor, what happens to detox? Automatically impaired.

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right? So why are we gonna work on detox off the bat? Because if we just get that first phase done, we’re starting to work on detox even though we’re not working on it directly, because it’s body system three, we already worked on it in the intro phase. Number one. Number two, we actually start breaking down the foods. That means we start breaking down the proteins into their smaller amino acid constituents and we know how important the sulfur based amino acids for operating phase 2 detoxification. Phase 2 is like the n-acetylation, hydroxylation, the glutathione production, the methylation, and we need methionine and we need cysteine and glutamine and glycine and taurine, and all these really important sulfur aminos, and if we can’t break down our protein constituents into those smaller products, you know? Ripping off the pearl necklace and pulling off the individual pearls, that’s what it’s akin to. If we can’t do that, we’re not gonna be able to run phase 2 and then frankly we need lots of antioxidants and B vitamins to run phase 1. So if we have SIBO or dysbiosis, well, our probiotic production internally from our gut bacteria is automatically forwarded or downregulated because we know good bacteria in our gut produces a lot of those nutrients for us, right? Good bacteria eats poop and poops nutrition, B vitamins, antioxidants, nutrients. Bad bacteria eats nutrition and poops poop. Bad bacteria makes you more toxic. So what is the more toxicity from the bad bacteria due to body system three? It decreases its function. So you can see how we lead up to diet and lifestyle. We lead up to digesting food. We lead up to healthy gut bacteria, knocking out infection, addressing the flora, because all of that sets the stage for body system three, so we can come in there and really support the nutrients that are missing, the pathways that aren’t working properly, and we can potentially even knockout specific heavy metals if we see heavy metals are in there with other types of chelators and compounds that pull the metals out. And some of the test we do—well, I’ll take a breath there, Evan. Any comments?

Evan Brand:  Yeah, I mean, well said. I wanted to mention this comes at the end because we want to make sure that everything else has been addressed upstream. I mean we’re not going to go straight to detox if we know that you have infections and we know that you’re still getting, let’s say artificial sweeteners in your diet which can be placing a burden on the liver, right? So we want to see the liver and your detoxification abilities, methylation, this includes anybody with like MTHFR genetic defects. This includes you, too. All that other stuff’s gotta be taken care of first because we want to see what the actual baseline is. Not the baseline when you are doing so much sugar and alcohol and bad fats and artificial sweeteners and all of that that’s got the burden on the liver. So once we get all that stuff out of the way, then we take a look at body system three. It’s the, “Oh, okay, so this is the true baseline,” and then yeah we can look for heavy metals, from dental fillings, amalgams, you know, bad food, bad water, too much tuna fish, other environmental exposures, and then we can start helping to get the detox system working better because if you’re not pooping well and you have an overburdened liver, you’re just gonna be recirculating all these toxins. So then you’re gonna get the joint pain and the allergies and the asthma, and the skin problems, the headaches, the brain fog, alcohol intolerance, I mean, we could go on and on but you gotta get all that other stuff taken care first, so if you go straight to detox or somebody tries to sell you on some detox protocol first when you don’t even know if you have leaky gut or not, I would be cautious and maybe you have more to say about that, but I don’t like the idea of pushing stuff out of people’s body if they don’t even have enough trash men to come gather all of the trash at the end of the road.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, 100%. So we have everything lead up to it and I think you emphasized the whole leaky gut part right because the leaky gut as you mentioned is really the consequence of all of the inflammation, the inability to break down food, the compromised immune system, and then the infections. All of that will lead to leaky gut. So leaky gut isn’t necessarily a result. It’s more of an effect of all of the inflammation and the damage.

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right? The gluten, the bad foods, all of the inflammation. So that’s kind of the end product that you get there is leaky gut. So looking at everything that you mentioned. How do we quantify it? Because you put some really good points out there. How do we actually know what’s going on from the detoxification side? Well, we’ll look at an organic acid test. Typically as a good starting point because we’ll get a window into various detoxification pathways, whether it’s pyroglutamate or other types of organic acids, sulfate—these are organic acids that will give us a window into how those sulfur aminos are doing. If the demand for them is higher or if they’re depleted. And we’ll also get a window into B vitamin status. We’ll get a window into methylation and we’ll also get a window into oxidative stress by looking at the 8-hydroxy 2-deoxyguanosine for instance. Again, these are all like jeopardy words but these are organic acids that give us a window into all these systems, whether it’s simply xanthorrhoea for B6, whether it’s the amino acids for the brain with vanilmandelate or homovanilate or 5-hydroxyindoleacetate or whether it’s markers for gut bacteria like hippurate or benzoate. So these—these markers give us a big window into what’s happening and the organics can really help tell us what’s happening there from some of those detox nutrients, and we may even look at like a SpectraCell or a NutrEval as well. Again, I lean more towards the organics because that’s my baby.

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  The NutrEval combines the organics with another blood test for nutrients, too. So that’s a—another side option which at least does contain the organics and that gives us a good window into what’s happening but we always go back to intro, body system one, hormones, ATF, ATM; body system two, the ability to digest, removing food allergens, healing the leaky gut, repairing the gut lining, removing infections, adding in probiotics, and retesting because we gotta make sure new infections aren’t there and the old ones are gone. Number—body system three is gonna be detox nutrients and that’s typically where we follow suit, and we reserve the right to kinda move some things in. Like if I know someone has a ton of oxidative stress, I may throw some extra vitamin C that we may discover on an organics test, I may throw it in with the adrenal protocol. So we do things and we mix-and-match outside of that box a bit, so if any patients are listening, they may think, “Well, Dr. J gave me some detox support in body system one,” and that’s gonna be dependent upon how that person’s presenting, how sensitive they are, and how bad their detox is. We may add some small things in with body system one, because maybe the adrenal support is too much for their liver, and we need to give their liver just a little bit of support so they don’t have a lot of those hormone side effects.

Evan Brand:  Totally, well said. I’m gonna mention two things and then we can wrap it up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Cool.

Evan Brand:  One for me on the organics, which I just love is the quinolinic 5-HIAA ratio–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yup.

Evan Brand:  Looking at inflammation because you could go on and on and sound fancy, but when someone sees inflammation and you’re like, “Look, here it is.” It’s like, “Oh, crap.” Because inflammation, you know, even a conventional physician is gonna talk about inflammation as a cause of disease, right? And so when we can actually prove that to a client or a patient, it’s incredible and it’s very profound to be able to do that and then whether it’s 3, 4, 6 months later when the retest comes, and you can see that that number’s gone down, it’s very, very rewarding for both of us, and lastly, the toxin piece, too, something that Justin and I have been talking about a lot and—and I’m running on—I’m running this test on nearly everyone I possibly can–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yup.

Evan Brand:  Including myself is the GPL-TOX so I can look at the toxic load because I bought a sauna based on my toxic load of insecticides, and this is not a challenge or a push test so even the sickest people, we don’t have to worry about doing any type of chelation which may push some stuff out. You just urinate in—in the morning in a cup and you send it off. And the cool thing is you can run it side-by-side with the organics, so it’s literally the same urine sample. All you have to do is spend a little bit extra investment to get both test run organics and GPL-TOX at the same time, and I had insecticide levels in my body that are known carcinogens that were higher than they should be. And so for me, this is a huge, huge, huge new realm of opening up this. Look, we know there’s detox problems. Let’s fix it, but what are we actually fixing. You know, that had always been the question, right? Ooh, there’s detox problems. Man, you got headaches. You got chemical sensitivity. You can’t handle perfumes, gas fumes. Look, here’s why. And oh, man, is there anything more fun in the world than this? I mean, I—I don’t think so.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, I agree. I mean, it’s like we’re CSI detectives without all the—the murder and blood, right?

Evan Brand:  Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  We’re trying to put together the—the puzzle piece that’s really getting people’s quality of life back. So just summarizing those tests. We run the organics test. We run maybe the OAT, which is the—the Great Plains Lab organics. We run the GPL-TOX. We may run the NutrEval, the SpectraCell and then we have the heavy metal challenge test where we challenge, with a chelation compound, like DMPS or DMSA or EDTA to get a window into the toxic burden of metals because metals don’t want to stay in systemic circulation. They don’t wanna stay in the blood. They only go on the blood acutely in that first 24 to 48 hours, then they go into the tissue.

Evan Brand:  Yup.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Whether it’s the brain or the individual tissues or even bones when it comes to lead. So we gotta get a window into it so we have to do a challenge, a provocation agent that can go in into the tissues and really kinda pull things out. It’s like, “Hey, you go outside. You look for bees. There may not bees swarming around, but if there’s a beehive there, well provocation agent’s throw rock into the beehive, right?” You know those bees are in that beehive when those—when that rock hits it and those bees come out, that’s the provocation agents. So we use that same kind of methodology with the heavy metal test. The rock is like the chelation compound that we use to see what’s coming out in the urine and a lot of times we see aluminum, we see arsenic, we see cadmium, and we see a whole bunch of mercury and lead, and it’s different for each person.

Evan Brand:  Yup, absolutely, and then you got blood metals, too. Quicksilver’s Blood Metals is cool.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yup.

Evan Brand: There’s the Mercury Tri Test, too, for hair, blood, urine. There’s so many different things out there. A lot of them are good. A couple of them are bad, but you know, we’ll help you to make the distinction what is right for you and this is case-by-case. Some people they may not need to investigate metals. Other people they’ll come to us and they’ll say, “Evan or Justin, man, I got metal problems.” And they just have a gut feeling and in those cases, I say, “Okay, cool. Let’s get you checked out.“ It’s not gonna hurt. It can only help you to investigate. So if you have a gut feeling and that gut feeling can be disrupted obviously if you have got problems, right? Because the inflammation in the gut, you might be getting mixed signals, but if you have a gut feeling, ask us, and let us help you to investigative. If it’s something we didn’t bring up yet or maybe it’s early in the game and we wanted to do it later, just bring it up because you never know. You could be onto something that we just haven’t got to yet and that may save us, you know, a month or two of—of time.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Absolutely. And again, we’ll the show notes for everything, the full transcription, again in my new Thyroid Book that will be coming out very soon, just putting the finishing touches on it, we’re gonna have a chapter in the book all on this type of discussion, putting it all together because I feel like this is probably one of the key pieces that most functional medicine practitioners and doctors really, it—it’s very esoteric. It’s kind of in the ether. Like how does it all look?

Evan Brand:  Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Like what does the whole plan look like? And it just kinda like, you feel like almost like they’re making it up as they go and I think is really important if you’re gonna hou—you know, you’re gonna hike Mt. Everest so to speak, I wanna see that map. I want to know how we’re gonna go up there. I wanna know how we’re navigate that crevice and—and get across that—that ledge or that cliff. I wanna kinda feel like it makes sense when we get directions. So I think that’s a really important piece that we’re adding, is that clarity and that, you know, what’s our fu—future pacing vision? How are we getting to the top?

Evan Brand:  Yup, amen.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Anything you wanna add there, Evan?

Evan Brand:  I don’t think so. I think this was great and fun as always, real honor. If people want to schedule, go to justinhealth, J-U-S-T-I-N, Justinhealth.com to schedule with Justin. If you want to schedule with myself, go to notjustpaleo.com and like I said, we both block out a few hours, so you know, if there’s a spot available, you wanna grab it for the 15-minute free call. See if we’re a good fit, you know, discuss your options together. Justin and I are happy to do that and we look forward to helping you all out. You know, listening to this is one thing. Getting in the trenches with us is another, and I mean without functional medicine, I would likely still be dealing with depression and irritable bowel syndrome and skin issues and fatigue and insomnia and adrenal problems. I mean, every aspect, everything that could’ve gone wrong was wrong in my body systems and just one by one, plucking these things off the list, and there’s never a finish line, right? I mean it’s always a continual journey. So you’re just always pushing to the next step ahead and this is your time. You know, you don’t have to suffer.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Love it. I appreciate the hope and the inspiration, Evan.

Evan Brand:  Yes, sir.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Great chat. Great chat. Look forward to chatting with you very soon.

Evan Brand:  You, too. Take care.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Have an awesome day!

Evan Brand:  You, too. Bye.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Bye.

Elise Carr – Getting in touch with your sexuality – podcast #114

Dr. Justin Marchegiani has a special guest today from Australia and she’s no other than Elise Carr where they discuss about holistic health and wellness. After having experienced a health challenge, Elise shares with us her journey on how she got to where she’s at now.

Elise CarrGet an overview of why there should be a need to connect with our sacred sexual and sacred spiritual selves and discover what Tantra really is about. Find out why breathing consciously is essential and how you can practice it properly. Learn about masculine and feminine energy balance when you listen to this podcast interview.

In this episode, topics include:

01:16   Past and present lifestyle

14:11   Tantra

19:24   Breathing

24:12   Masculine and feminine energy balance

32:15   Scheduling time

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youtuve

 

 

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Hey there, it’s Dr. J! Welcome back to Beyond Wellness Radio. Today we get a great guest, Elise Carr, from down under, right? Over in Australia.

Elise Carr:  That is right Dr. J! Is a pleasure to be here. Thank you very much for having me.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I love it. I love how technology. We’re—we’re so close here. This is great.

Elise Carr:  It is, isn’t it? We gotta be grateful for that.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Very cool, and I’ll just drop your site for anyone interested at kind of checking your info out, as your—as the interview goes—www.stellamuse.com. So really interesting stuff on there, really interesting information, and we’re gonna just kinda go over a couple of—the few key things that we talked about in our—our pre-interview. So I’m really excited to dig in.

Elise Carr:  Yeah, for sure, and yeah, absolutely. Stella Muse is a great website and plenty of free videos and—and info that we’re having a look at, you know, after we have a chat as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Very cool. Well, tell me a little bit about yourself at least. How did you get into the health field. I know you do a lot of coaching with clients and patients so to speak. What are some the big issues that, you know, your patients that you see every day are—are dealing with? And how did you get into the field?

Elise Carr:  Yeah, great questions. I was definitely brought up in a very holistic way, so health and wellness and well-being and having a really strong connection to looking after yourself and the way you live your life, has been a part of my life since I can remember. So that’s probably a gift from—from my upbringing right there. But it was also in understanding that I had a choice as well. And when I didn’t make great choices like you know, not that I was ever, to be honest, everyone into the drugs, rock ‘n roll kind of partying phase, didn’t go there. But I had a really strong I guess view of that world because I came from the modeling industry.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  So I—I saw what it could be like when you made choices for yourself that really weren’t honoring your body temple, your life, anything to make you feel–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  Stronger, healthier, really actually connected to yourself and—and the earth and all of the above. So that was great in that sense. So when I say how I got into this, I came from a very different background. I actually originally studied journalism and Public Relations. I was working those fields whilst modeling internationally and doing freelance journalism. It was really being a part of this world whilst wanting to live a very holistic lifestyle that I found that these weren’t marrying up. It wasn’t really in sync. And—and I wasn’t able to be the person that I really want to be and—and serve the way I wanted to serve, so I eventually through different life circumstances merged into going back and starting my masters in Communications and Cultural Politics and Women’s Studies, and that was the catalyst for me to then pull back from the whole journalism pay on world and—and then instead go into studying coaching and get my Reiki masters and go and study more esoteric work and healing—healing work and from there, go and expand and learn and become certified as a Tantra practitioner and kind of gathered this interesting eclectic bag of tools to then create Stella Muse and offer this as an entire holistic yes, but also an empowering platform and—and space to be able to serve people in the way that I feel you I’m here to serve. So it’s kind of like a calling like–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Many of us are saving different ways.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  It’s not that I ever expected I’d be doing is. I thought I’d be a psychologist or a lawyer, you know? But those shoes didn’t fit. So–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  I’m very fortunate to be where I am now. I feel and having created Stella Muse and—and get to offer a service that I feel can—can enrich their lives and yes, connect them to a—a space of–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Absolutely wellness and—and holistic lifestyle, as much as empowering who they are and why they’re here.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So it’s really interesting that you are a model first, and then you kinda transitioned over to the health field. Looking back, how difficult was it or—or maybe you didn’t even have that awareness back when you were modeling to–

Elise Carr:   Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Practice a healthy lifestyle, meaning eating, you know, a nutrient-rich, nutrient dense diet.

Elise Carr:   Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Not having to wor—worry about counting every calorie and also not having to worry about getting excessive movement to burn those calories up. What was that like for you? What was the pressures like?

Elise Carr:  Sure, well, I guess, I’m in my early 30s now and I started modeling at the age of seven.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Wow.

Elise Carr:  And that was by choice. I was never pushed into.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  I had a very supportive mum that said, “What would you like to do?” You know like as—as an afterschool activity and she listed many things. Karate was one of those or Taekwondo and—and modeling was in the mix. So I chose–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  I—I always chose this, and to be honest I still am in the modeling world now. I just choose very different jobs to accept and—and weave it in with my work. So as I mentioned, holistic life, eating nourishing foods, knowing I need sleep, not choosing to take drugs, not choosing to drink alcohol, all those things were so they’re already ingrained in me. So when I was going into my thing in early 20s and started working internationally, I already had a very strong ethos and—and a pretty strong belief in self and this was tested time and time again, mind you, but what I found—what was one of my crossroads for me is that it wasn’t necessarily the wellness in the sense of exercise. I was very dedicated to exercise. I looked after my body temple in that regard.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Food-wise, I did the best with my capacity at the time. We can always improve.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  There’s always room for—for trying different things. Really when I can like narrow in, I think what I was missing was good fats to be honest.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Because the fat thing was like, “Oh, you can’t have fat.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  You know? But now I’m like, “Oh, my gosh. Give me the organic olive oil. Give me the avocados. Give me the nuts.”

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  So there was a misconception. So there was probably a lack of awareness there, but other than that, for me living in that world, what I was actually missing was probably vitamin L, which was love.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  When you’re living that lifestyle away from your family and friends and my beloved at the time, my—my partner, that was what was suffering. My soul was being undernourished. My—even my emotional intelligence and my intellect was hungry for something else, so that’s why I say, when we look at holistic health, it is the whole spectrum. And while I may have been eating to the best of my ability and looking after myself and—and not eating things that were gonna be the detriment of my health, and exercising very well and doing my best to plate—you know, how—how much you can fastest to playto when you’re working crazy hours and you know that being a doctor.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Crazy hours, too.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  But it was those other elements, the vitamin L as I mentioned and—and those are the connections that that made me actually quite unwell and I came back from one of my international stints with a cyst on my ovary that ruptured and my heart actually–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, wow.

Elise Carr:  Flatlined for a time so–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Wow.

Elise Carr:  But interestingly enough, the cardiologist says you’re disgustingly healthy because every time my heart start again on it’s own. It was just the toxins from that cyst that went through my body that caused me to kinda have many kinda shutdowns, while it could do it’s best to help itself, and when I look back and—and apparently my—my insides, all my beautiful organs are textbook perfect. So the irony was like, if I’m actually “healthy”–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  What was my body shutting down for? And I—and I can’t say anything else. No other doctor and I spent years seeing many specialists, like the top specialist in all these different fields who could not give me any other answer. So I had to realize I had to take the power back myself and—and I realized that really the end of the day I was missing soul, spirit, love, heart–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  All those kind of things. We cannot function without it. We can’t. So I had to change my life in a big way and start nourishing those sides of me at the same time as yes, absolutely, still enriching my—my food choices and my exercise is still a massive part of my life, but you cannot discount the other factors.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.  So—so interesting you mentioned about the fat part because I think that’s something–

Elise Carr:  Mmm…

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  A lot of people intuitively say well, you know, the fat you eat’s the fat you wear, but we kinda know it’s fat’s really important for our cells and lipid bilayers and our hormones and our brain health and our neurology, and just kinda–

Elise Carr:  Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Looking at what your friends were doing in that industry, knowing what you know now, what kind of pressure–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Was there? What was everyone else doing from a lifestyle perspective? Were you living a healthier lifestyle the most? And others were kinda off? What was your perspective?

Elise Carr:  For me I guess it was that I was living a different—

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Different lifestyle. It was just different–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Choices and–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  We all have our own paths and some people–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Wanted to live in the now, in the moment, and it was just the next quick fix, however that looked.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  That might be buying, you know, the latest outfit and let’s—let’s be real here, maybe we’ll start with the consumerism, whether in the modeling industry or not. So it was that side of things, there was the, I wanna, you know, party so there was the drugs and there was the drinking. You know, there was the, I hadn’t had a meal today, so I’m just gonna grab fast food or I’m not going to eat.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  I’m gonna have coffee. There—there are all these different choices which, yes, we know are common in—in an industry like modeling or dancing or whatever it is. But this can happen in—in any walk of life. So yeah, I saw this. I also saw others–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Who were addicted to the gym.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  We see this in every walk of life as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  I never even considered counting calories. If someone said how many calories are in, you know, raw vegan chocolate, my favorite prize, or a stick of carrot, I would have no clue. It was never the same—that came into my mind. I did you know, weigh myself at that stage and I had an expectation of where I wanted to sit which felt healthy for me, but I never felt under extreme scrutiny or pressure–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  To have to in that moment lose 2 kilos or something absurd like that, and I would never capitulate to that. I had a very, very strong sense of self which as I said got tested all over and over again, but I still didn’t wanna be something I wasn’t, even though you’re pressured. I didn’t—I didn’t let that overtake me. I don’t feel.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm. So after you developed the health challenge, the health scare with the ovarian cyst and you had the flatlining–

Elise Carr:  Yeah. Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  What happened next? How did you overcome that health challenge?

Elise Carr:  Well, I had to have a bit of time off.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  I wasn’t really—I wasn’t able to drive a car, let alone walk properly or wash my own hair like my body was in serious, just exhaustion. So I was back in Australia at this time, and I—I wasn’t able to do hardly anything. My relationship broke down. I wasn’t, you know, being a journalist. I wasn’t being a model. All the facets of me, what I thought were me, were taken away, and so I was really only left with what I really am. You know? Nothing that you can fix or do. You’re not your title. You’re not your job. You’re not what you have. We need to understand this and this was my big wake-up. It was a massive, massive AHA! moment for me and it was in that time that I then spoke to my auntie, who lives in the UK, and because this was before social media, the way I used to communicate with my family when I was away was writing epic emails, and that’s—I’d be sharing what’s going on with this show and this experience and where I’m at, and what it’s like living in Asia at the time. And she said, “Why don’t you take these emails and write a fat book?” As she termed it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  And I was like, I never consider doing that. And that was me shifting my path from then instead of writing articles. I started writing a book and now 10 years later, you know, this book is in discussion with another agent to get it—to get it published. It’s been a bit of a rocky road to find the right fit. But it’s definitely–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Is there a name for it yet?

Elise Carr:  Yes, it’s called Runway, and there’s a—there’s a page on my book–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, cool.

Elise Carr:  You can sign up to hear about the publishing when that gets finalized and—and now I’m writing my second book on women’s sexuality called Yoni Power, and it—it just shifted my life and it was from there that I then chose to go back and do my masters and—and follow on with all my other training and certification and studies and—and life experience. It just—it changed my life, and I—I didn’t choose then to—to want to model full-time ever again. Because as much as I loved being part of that world, I wasn’t of that world.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, got it.

Elise Carr:  And I had to be real that that. I had to be real. I knew if I—you know, went—and I did. I moved to Paris. I went there but I didn’t—I didn’t push to try and get on the runways. I did work during Fashion Week over there but it wasn’t—it wasn’t enough and so I found an editor and got my book on the road, and I was painting and I was writing more, and I was just immersing in this place I always wanted to be but I didn’t—didn’t pound the pavement and—and you know, storm around forcing this—this career, I suppose, that did not resonate with my heart and soul unfortunately, as much as you know, there’s beautiful elements in the industry. On its own, it wasn’t enough for me.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Got it. So you’ve taken all your experiences as a—a model and then kind of a transformation with your health challenges and then you have incorporated a lot with—with Tantra and—and various female sexuality and you’re incorporating that with the clients you’re working to—with today. Is that correct?

Elise Carr:  Absolutely.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So how does that look?

Elise Carr:  Absolutely.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  If I’m—I’m someone coming in, who’s the average person or average patient or client you’re working with, and what are their issues?

Elise Carr:  No one’s average. I definitely have, you know, like I’m sure you do—there’s a massive mixed bag of tricks.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  We’re all very individual, although yes, you’re right. There are many similarities. I work mainly with women but I have more and more men, and I have more and more couples as well that I work with.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  And—and this is from the empowerment coaching, so looking at that whole holistic perspective and then weaving in elements of—of Tantra to get a strong connection with your sacred sexual and sacred spiritual selves essentially to raise your consciousness, have a deeper connection with who you are, deeper connection into the intimacy with your beloved, deeper connection with all that is. So there’s always kind of side, you know, elements and then also more of my healing work as—as a Reiki master doing more energetic and—and esoteric work. So there’s that kinda thing as well , but I can weave all of that into the coaching and mainly the people that come to me are at a crossroads and this crossroads is often that they are now at a point in life where they realize they don’t choose to live like this anymore, and whether that is changing their profession from being in, you know, a—a very demanding corporate job and leading that lifestyle where they are lacking substance, kind of like what I experienced, but the other way around. But that disconnection from soul, that disconnection from spirit, that disconnection from their purpose and wanting to transition into a—a service role that they really deeply connect with. There’s that side of things. There’s all these where it’s the relationship side of things where they are feeling a disconnect from themselves. They disconnect from the sexual power. They disconnect from their body. They disconnect from their heart. And then whether they are in a relationship are not, they usually are feeling that disconnect with their partner if they are in a relationship.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  So they kind of–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So looking at a lot—Uh-hmm, go ahead.

Elise Carr:  Just because they’re—in answer to your question, they’re kind of, you know, common streams I guess that connect many of the clients that I work with.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So I’m just trying to get a good visualization because we do similar things with, you know, the—the coaching side, right? You’re getting people’s diet and lifestyle, and kinda core fundamental things kinda dialed in, what you’re eating, sleeping, movement, hydration, those kind of things, and then you’re building on top.

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  You’re putting a lot of focus on the sexuality aspect which is something I don’t really touch upon too much outside of, you know, making sure relationships are—are relatively healthy or referring out for good support.

Elise Carr:  Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  But you do a lot with the Tantra—

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Tantra part of it which a lot of people listening probably know that to be something about sexual positions and such. Can you go more into–

Elise Carr:  Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  What that is and then how do you—do you—how does that work? Are you giving people a prescription for certain things to do at night? How does that look?

Elise Carr:  Sure. Well, just—just to put out there–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  First and foremost, all the Tantra with the patients is fully clothed. There’s no genital touch.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  They can be misconstrued or misunderstanding if that–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Got it, okay.

Elise Carr:  It’s—it’s in a very safe space.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  And I have a personal practice as well, so it’s really fundamentally about building a connection with yourself and then if you’re in a relationship or want to create that with a future partner, building that with your partner, a lot of this resides in getting rid of trauma.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  We carry an incredible amount of trauma within ourselves and—and like you’re probably aware. You know, everything is energy. We know this from a science space. We have memories in our minds, but we also have muscle memory, right?  Now let’s say we tear muscle, that muscle is—is going to remember that experience, right? Even though it heals. So we also have the memory. I work on energetic levels. So we are gonna get a little bit metaphysical here, but instead of just the physical, instead of even just the emotional, we are looking at the energetic side of things and realizing that you may have had a traumatic experience when you’re a young man or someone’s a young woman, and they have held onto them. And we hold onto that in different parts of our bodies and I work with different energy centers. Some people know the—the term chakra–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  They’re just energy centers in the body.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Wheel.

Elise Carr:  We have seven of them.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Exactly. An energy wheel. We have seven of them internally and they connect to different elements of us. One of the biggest things I see is many people holding a lot of trauma in their second energy wheel.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  And this connects to the sex organs.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  So this trauma often connects to sex and sexuality. It also connects to money, power, and creativity. So if you’re not getting flow in those areas, they may likely be a trauma that you haven’t dealt with; release works through confronted, forgiven, and got your power back to get yourself in the present. We live so often in the past and so often in a future that we’re not really empowered in the present moment. So all this may seem like a very long path to get to your true potential, to empower you, for you to connect with your sexual energy, for you to able to express yourself and feel into your essential nature as an individual, let alone in a couple. We need clear that trauma. So I do a lot of work, you know, excavating these spaces and clearing them so that we can start rebalancing where we’re at in the here and now. And a lot of that to be honest works with forgiveness because–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  As humans it does not come naturally to forgive. We love to hold on to things like a bag of–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Hot coals and the reality is we’re when doing ourselves an injustice. We’re not helping ourselves because that person who, you know, abused you, neglected you, abandoned you, whatever it was and I am not saying that horrible things don’t happen and that’s, you know, these are being excused—not by any means—but I’m talking here on an energetic level. I’m talking here like it’s a mystical act to be able to forgive their soul, so that you can be released. You’re not necessarily going to have to forget that that happened and you don’t want to forget because it means then you will learn in the future not to make those same choices perhaps, and not to be in that same position perhaps. But we need to understand that we have the power, you have the power, I have the power to make those choices for our own lives to change where we’re at, and this is about the empowerment work that I do that weaved into the—to the Tantra. Because we give a lot of our power away. We give a lot of our sexual power away. You know, we say Yes–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  We wanna say No. We gotta strengthen our boundaries. So while Tantra is yes, sexuality and spirituality, there’s a lot of foundational work there that covers our entire life. And this is why to me Tantra is a lifestyle. We’re weaving together that sacral sexual and spirit to—to awaken our consciousness and by awakening our consciousness we—we’re making wiser choices.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  So when you look at–

Elise Carr:  We’re empowering ourselves.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right, so when you look at your—these clients, they’re coming in, whatever type of health issues you have, whether it’s on the health side, whether it’s their past trauma, you’re looking at that and from there, you’re kind of creating a prescription on the—the Tantra side of specific positions to help kinda reawaken these various chakras. Is that what I’m hearing?

Elise Carr:  I can do chakra rebalancing, absolutely, that’s part of it.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  It’s very much case-sensitive. Often I will say mainly for women, some men if they are open to it, to do a guided chakra regression.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  It’s kind of like a semi-version of hypnosis of sort, but you have to be really active in the mind or your body is calm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  So if there are any yogis listening, it’s kinda of like Yoga nidra.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  It’s like you’re in a beautiful deep relaxation, but your mind is switched on and can do the work while your body is totally chilled out loving it. This kind of work is purely guided by my voice, so I will guide them back into their low-energy wheels to essentially bring up, confront whatever’s been housed there, and yeah, it’s in the form of memories. It’s not in the sense essential to relive it, to just purely bring up the past. That’s not the point. The point is that it’s there. You’re holding onto it. It is not serving you. We need to confront it. You need to get your power back and you need to forgive that person, that experience, whatever it is to di—like disconnect, detach from that, let it go and move on so we can clear that out and move up, and move you into the present. So that’s one element and that’s obviously my healing modality, but that is one simple practice that I can do with—and I do with clients all around the world via Skype to then have them in a clearer space, to be able to do, let’s say, the Tantric work, and you know–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  A prescription of such, you know, learning how to breathe is one of the found—like foundational techniques that I will teach someone on the Tantric path because we don’t breathe properly. We shallow breathe all the time and breath is one of the most important key parts to not only our survival, but then yes, our sexual empowerment. You can change your whole sexual experience when you start working with breath which sounds crazy, but once you learn it, it will change how you approach that and I’ve got free videos that I can share with you, Dr J, if you wanna–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Share them with your listeners as well to get them–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  On that track if they are curious.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  That’d be great. Yeah, I see a lot of people that are in that sympathetic Fight or Flight nervous system state.

Elise Carr:  Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right? Kinda the adrenals–

Elise Carr:  Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Are being whipped so to speak. They’re really breathing from their chest which, you know, really actually further puts them into that sympathetic adrenal state because if they drif—if they breathe from their chest, right?

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  They’re activating a lot of these neck muscles which puts him into this forward head posture which then actually decreases the airflow, so then they have less oxygen going in and, you know, less airflow going to the nose and the na—the nasal sinuses is what actually activates the parasympathetics through breathing. So instead of this deep belly breath, where they are moving their—their belly as they breathe. They’re breathing from their neck.

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  They’re breathing from their chest and they’re activating that Fight or Flight nervous system. Are you finding something similar with your clients?

Elise Carr:  Yes. And—and obviously, I mean that may sound extreme for some people because they don’t realize how interconnected we are. The human body is just phenomenal. So I’m so pleased to you explained like that. It’s really important to have a good understanding of the effect of not breathing correctly, and—and to get an understanding of what breathing correctly looks like, watch a baby breathe or watch, you know, your pet like a cat or a dog and see that full belly expansion, and then the collapse of the belly as it draws—the belly button draws back towards the spine. This is what we are talking about here, and that’s the way, yeah, we slow down. You know, the Fight or Flight. We slow down the parasympathetic–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  Nervous system. That’s normally on edge and it’s that, you know, that heart kind of palpitation almost, that kind of flighty energy that is literally sucking our power away, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  So it’s—it’s the way we choose to breathe on si—one simple thing. If you don’t take anything else from this conversation we’re having for these lovely listeners, it’s looking at how you’re breathing right now. Right now in this very moment where you’re driving in the car. You can do it whether you’re walking with, you know, a podcast going rounds. The streets, anywhere, you can actually slow down and—and I encourage clients to do this first thing in their morning. You know, in the morning when they’re laying in bed, even put one hand on the belly and one hand on the heart, and have this connection. Have this connection with yourself and then to do it throughout the day whenever they feel a bit anxious or nervous or angry, overwhelmed, whatever it is, and then last thing at night. Bring yourself back to this point also helps with the reconnection to yourself, and that is so important because we are so disconnected, even though like we are talking across the world right now, we’re so connected technologically. But we’re so disconnected emotionally, spiritually, energetically, and–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  And this is what’s so important. This is what we’re missing in this day and age, and there is no—there’s no wonder drug. There’s no Band-Aid. There’s—there’s no, you know, remedy for that. We—we really need to—to just own it and understand that, you know, the power’s with me. I have to make some more conscious choices. So let’s start with my breath.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I think that’s great and with patients you’ve kind of alluded to it, one hand on the heart, one hand on the belly–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And what I tell my patients is very simple. The hand—the hand that’s in the belly is the one that should be moving and the one over the heart really shouldn’t be moving much. It should be primarily coming from that bottom hand on the belly which really tells me that your breathing from the diaphragm and you’re having those really good big diaphragmatic breaths, into the nose, out through the nose or into the nose, out to the mouth to really–

Elise Carr:   Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Get the parasympathetics going, and I also recommend doing that to like one of the M waves. Familiar with the Heart Math Institute? They have like–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  The M wave that kinda helps get you into coherence which is looking at heart rate variability and its timing and synchronizing the breath in and out to get you into that state of coherence where the brain and the heart are neurologically kind of communicating at its peak.

Elise Carr:  Yeah, and the interesting thing, I’m not sure if you come from this school of thought, but I certainly believe that while we’ve obviously got our—our normal brain, you know, the heart and also like the digestive system, like you know that lower hand where it’s gonna be, they are also kind of like main brains as well. So we want those three kind of brain of sorts to be functioning and talking and in harmony together.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  To me that’s so important and—and while the hand on your heart may not be moving and we definitely don’t want this to be moving as much as that–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Belly hand, we want you to be at even connect with your heartbeat.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Start to feel that. Start to slow down enough, to be present enough to just relax into the moment and know that you are doing something wonderful by just being. This thing that I do a lot of work with is is the doing and the being. And I break this up–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Into like the masculine doing and the feminine being, because we do a lot of energy work. As I’ve already touched on my Tantra, and we talk about Shakthi and Shiva, like the god and the goddess.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  The two parts, like the Yin and the Yang.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  I’m sure we’ve all seen that, you know where it’s like–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  The black kind of little blob that’s actually a fish with the little white bit and—and the white with a little black.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  That is us. We are, like you are mainly masculine but you’ve got some feminine energy–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  And I mainly feminine but I have some masculine energy. We need these to harmonize ourselves in this day and age in such a driving, doing success, you know? Hungry environment, humanity, society we’ve create. We’re very disbalanced. We’re very masculine the way we do things. We think we must be doing things all the time. We have checklist. We have to rush here–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  And here. We don’t achieve enough at certain time. This is all masculine and don’t get me wrong, I have much reverence for that and I love it, and we need this side of us to get things done. But we also need to see the value in—in the being, in the feminine, in the creative, in the flow, in the slowing down and the enjoying, right?

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  This is also what’s missing in our life and that saying that, you know, I feel was something that was missing in my life when I—when I had that health scare. And many clients that I see, they’re either too far in their masculine—some of them, not very often a too far of a feminine not getting things done, because they’re changing her mind and—and flighty and—and from here to there, here to there. We need to find balance and strike that balance every single day. That’s another thing you can ask yourself is, “Am I driving too much?” That the type A personality, the must achieve, the must do this, they’re working 12 hours, 14 hours a day. Pulling back and—and honoring some You time.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Sometimes we even need to have like, you know, a date for ourselves where I’m gonna go to the museum today. I’m gonna take myself to a movie. I’m gonna sleep in. I’m gonna read a book. And just, you know, whether it’s 20 minutes, maybe 5 minutes to slow down and have a cup of tea. We have to start valuing these as well because otherwise we reach burnout and I’m sure you’ve seen it with your clients.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  Like it can get to adrenal fatigue. It can get to absolute exhaustion. It can get to depression or so many different ways it can appear physically if we’re not–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Emotionally nourishing ourselves and—and looking at the energetics–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Things as well.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And I—I see a lot of patients who are female, typically my average patients between 35 and 65 in female—I’d see majority female but I still have a good percent of—of males as well, but–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  There’s a typical pattern that I see in a lot of my female patients, right?

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  There—there’s this type A kind of, you know, go-go-go type of world that we all live in and–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I kind of see that as women tapping into that masculine side, where they’re trying to go-go-go-go-go and–

Elise Carr:  Definitely.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And there’s the inability to kinda bounce back and repair from that and it was interesting because you kind of can talk about in this abstract way of energy, but Dr. John Gray–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Did a lecture and he was talking about the female hormones, progesterone primarily estrogen–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  When there’s lots and lots of stress in an estrogen-like environment, testosterone is the fuel that kinda helps us buffer the cortisol and I kinda–

Elise Carr:  Yeah.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Testosterone’s like that male energy, right?

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm, absolutely.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And when testosterone is lower which is obviously the case in a female environment, right? 10 times lower than a male.

Elise Carr:  Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  They don’t quite have that recovery from the cortisol aspect, and I—I see that what you’re saying about the—the male-male—male side of it and the female side is the women kind of depleting some of that female energy by tapping too much into the male. Can you elaborate more on that? Do you see that as well from this Type A world–

Elise Carr:  Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  We live in?

Elise Carr:  Yes, and—and I love that you brought this up. And thank you for bringing the science into it. It’s so important as well and I totally hear you. In a simplistic way, I guess it well—what we’re saying here because we’re on the same page I feel is that females aren’t designed to function like that and yet we create a society where we have to fit into this box–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  That means this is how we are gonna supposed to act, so this is why now more than ever, there’s a massive calling for a shift. This is why you know we’ve got this new feminist kind of wave happening people are saying. Even men are saying I’m a feminist because I see the value in women. Now this isn’t about not loving men. Don’t get me wrong. I have deep reverence for men–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Absolutely. It’s about knowing where the strengths lie and saying that there is in quality in different strengths that we’re–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Equal but we had differences, right? And one thing that I find is deeply important that if we’re gonna, you know, speak about women in this regard, we obviously have a cycle, right? Let’s just say, you know, an average 28 day cycle. We are very much connected to the moon, the tides, all of the above.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  But to bring us back, you know, we know if we break it down like, you know, there’s seven days in—in each, kinda part of the cycle. If we look at this from an energetic perspective. We’ll see that you know, ovulation is an expressive time. A woman is mainly very expressive at this time. She then goes in, you know, to her creative phase for the next 7 days, and this right about she’s about to menstruate and then her menstruation time—we call it moon time, in my line of work—it’s a reflective time. She needs to pull back. This is not the time to be driving. I’m not saying you need to have, you know, five days off and that you—you can’t do things because you have your period. Not at all. But you need to know that you are in a very, you know, introspective phase of your cycle. You need to honor that, to slow down a little bit, to not book as many appointments–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  To not have as many meetings, to really honor where you’re at because women, we say the most psychic and intuitive at this phase as well. So that should be a gift. Back in ancient times, civilizations used to honor and revere women at this time. It was called the red tent. Women would gather in a space together and those who weren’t on the moon times, perhaps croons, the grandmothers who no longer are in this phase and—and the young children and the men would bring them food. They weren’t asked to do chores. They weren’t doing, doing, doing. They are being with each other, rubbing each other’s bellies, playing with each other’s hair, sharing stories, passing on wisdom from the eldest to the youngest. It was a very revered time. We have lost all of these because it’s like, “I don’t have time for that. I to do this, this, and this before 6 AM.” So we’ve—we’re really–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right.

Elise Carr:  Lost that balance plus the harmony. But the thing is once you come out of that reflective phase, after you’ve had your moon, after your period, you are in your most dynamic phase. But you will not be a most dynamic, really getting out, to do what you want to do if you do not honor that reflective time. We need harmony and balance. We need day and night. We need winter and summer. Like, you know, we can’t function all the time if everything was sunshine. We’d die. We could not function all the time if it was darkness; we’d die. And we’ve lost this connection and—and women especially because they feel they have to conform to something they’re not, but in saying that it’s also important for the men to know that they need to have downtime, too. They can’t always be the ones that are striving and—and having to do to provide in some ways. It’s okay for them to pull back a little bit and—and have a bit of time off and have some downtime and have some nurturing time, and to be held and seen as well. We need to install that into our young boys and young men and—and men of today and the world.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Is it testosterone is a big buffer from a hormone perspective of cortisol–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm. Yes.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right? And that’s the biggest thing. Men with adequate levels of testosterone, they can buffer the stress from cortisol, that’s a big aspect. But the problem is we live in a very toxic world where there are lots of synthetic estrogens around us.

Elise Carr:  I’m pleased you said this.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  And that can affect a lot of the brain feedback loops that talk to the genitals to make the hormones.

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It can do the same for females because they push them into estrogen dominance–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Which we did a big podcast on 2 weeks ago which can cause–

Elise Carr:  Right.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  More PMS, fibroids, endometriosis, fibrocystic breast, so there’s kind of on both sides there’s this yin and the yang like we talked about–

Elise Carr:  Uh-hmm.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Of different imbalances and yeah, you are totally right when it comes to the males as well. They have to make sure they’re doing the right things, keeping the insulin under control and doing all the good diet and lifestyle things regarding sleep and the breathing and the right movement. Is there anything else, let’s say a female listener here can be doing maybe different than a male, maybe we can break it up on what’s better for each to kinda their—more in touch with their sexuality outside of what we already mentioned so far?

Elise Carr:  Yeah, well I guess, besides what we just mentioned which is knowing your cycle and honoring those–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  You know, the express, creative, reflective dynamic.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Breathing, too.

Elise Carr:  Honoring that in itself is so important. Yes, the breathing we’ve touched on that. Actually, setting some time aside and I call these sacred sessions–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Like scheduling lovemaking if you’re in a couple–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  But scheduling time for yourself as an individual as well. So if you have children or you have a busy schedule, this is perfect for you because you live a scheduled life and this is the way you’ve constructed your life and—and your, you know, you’re part of that system and that’s okay if this what, you know, you choose. And if that is the case, then you need to actively get your pen in your hand and carve out, put it in, write it in pen. This is what I’m gonna do for me, and made it something a week, or maybe it’s one hour a week—I like to obviously have a little bit every day which is much nicer than just having one bit a week. You gotta find what works for you. But I call this non-negotiable time. I wrote an article about your best threesome ever–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Hmm.

Elise Carr:  And those three elements are with yourself–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  With—which is your soul I call that. With spirit, because it’s something greater than you have, however you connect with that, whether you believe that is God or the universal or source or whatever it is you call it. And then the third relationship is your tribe. It’s with your children. It’s with your beloved.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm. Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  It’s with community beyond that. But those first 2 relationships are non-negotiable. Non-negotiable. The first relationship is with yourself. So you might be, you know what, every single day I start my morning ritual with a cup of tea and I—I watch the sunrise if you are getting up that early or–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:   Whatever it is, you know, on your phone, you are not multitasking. You are not with another. It is purely You time for you. You are nourishing yourself, your soul. And once that is done, you’re ready to have a connection with something greater than you. For some people, this is in meditation. It’s in prayer. It’s on the yoga mat. It might be you know, speaking to—to a spiritual director. It might be going to church, however it looks, it doesn’t need to look a certain way, it’s just what you feel is a way you can connect. It might be you know, reading an excerpt from—from a book that you feel gives you some wisdom. It’s having a connection thing that’s greater than you to open that that channel, so you feel you have a connection there like a lifeline, and once you’ve nourished those two, you are then a more full and a more fulfilled camp to be of greatest service with your partner, with your child or children, in your community, at the office, in your space of work, however that is. But what we don’t do is nourish those 2 relationships first. We always go to that 3rd relationship and then we wonder why we’re angry, frustrated, feeling not seen, not heard, not held. And this applies to men and women. So I’ve kinda answered that, I guess in one go.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  But in that regard, we don’t have to be different. We’re still having a human experience. We still have to learn to take care of these elements or their selves in whatever way looks good for us, there’s no right and wrong, but you have to show up and do the work. You have to show up and do the work. No one else that can do this for you. Like I said, there’s—there’s no pill that can do that for you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Right, right, and you mentioned something earlier, just a few minutes ago about scheduling lovemaking. Can you go more into that?

Elise Carr:  Yeah, absolutely. So I wrote a post called Sacred Sessions and I did this because I was seeing more and more people having a disconnect with their, I say beloved, with your partner, with your husband and wife, boyfriend-girlfriend, whatever it is. In this day and age, we may be really supportive of each other. You know, we may do little things for each other, one person buys the grocery, one you know, pays the bills, whatever it is, right? We—we support each other and we have a union. But we’re neglecting the sacred sexual and the sacred spiritual at coming together, the intimacy, the real sacred time, so I said, ”You have to schedule this in. If you want to invest in this, it means that not that it doesn’t have the romantic or it doesn’t have to be spontaneous.” It may not conventionally spontaneous because you’re gonna be like, “Okay, Thursday evening 6 til 9, or whatever it is, 6 til 8, it’s just you and me. We’ve got a babysitter or we’re gonna, you know, go somewhere or we’re just gonna create some time and space in our own bedroom, it’s actually honoring your relationship so much that you’re making it just as important, if not more important than other things. This is what we need to know here. Because your beloved needs to know that they are important to you and you need to demonstrate that with action. Some people like the words on top of it. They like a gift–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  On top of it. They like some service on top of it. We may have heard of the Love Languages. This exists, too.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  And whether this is time where you actually make love or however that looks to you or whether it’s just being together and snuggling and having a shower together. I’ve written a list which I’m gonna publish soon about different ideas of how you can use this time, and you can be really playful and you can experiment with different, you know, sexual practices that you may not have explored before and whether it’s role-playing or give each other massages. It can be anything that you both consensually agree to want to explore together, and holding that space for each other. There’s no judgment there. There’s none of that. This is a really beautiful space to get really intimate with your beloved and not let it be superseded by something else, unless I said it is, you know, a serious extreme—if someone’s really unwell something drastic has happened and we have to understand. Life happens. Other than that, this is non-negotiable. Non-negotiable and it needs to be scheduled at least, you know, once a week or once a fortnight depending on how your relationship is set up.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  That’s great. That’s awesome. Well, is there any way listeners here can get a hold of you outside of your website? Is there anything else you want to share, any books or any other opt-ins or video series coming your way?

Elise Carr:  There’s a free video series on my website.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Oh, great.

Elise Carr:  It’s mainly targeted at ladies, but guys could definitely–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Get some value out of it. As soon as you click on StellaMuse.com, and that’s Stella with an A as you said, at the very top there’s an opt-in there for a 4-part video series and it touches on your sacred sexual space. We call it the Yoni, which means–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Literally your entire female genital area. The Yoni, the heart–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Ah.

Elise Carr:  The mind and how these need to be in sync for a woman to be fully in her most empowered space. So that video series is easily accessible and then at the bottom of our website, there’s a free e-book which is like a blueprint for your life purpose and it’s one that you can just print off and work through. It’s definitely for men, for women at any stage, great especially if you’re at a turning point and you want some guidance along the way. Other than that, you can head over to any of my social media links. There’s plenty of videos and—and lots of articles that are very practical and you can get some ideas that you can implement today, and if you feel I can be of service then Contact page, send me an email, and—and let me know specifically how you feel I can assist.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Excellent, and before I go into my last question, is there anything else that’s on the tip of your, kinda tongue or your—on top of your head that you wanted to really put out there to the listeners?

Elise Carr:  The most important thing is—is to honor your integrity and truth.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Uh-hmm.

Elise Carr:  Out if everything we’ve spoken about here, it really has to resonate with you. There’s no right and wrong but you have to carve out that time, a bit of space, a bit of stillness to start listening to what your body, your heart, your soul, your mind, your genitals is—is saying to you because our bodies talk to us all the time. We know when we’re tired. We know when we’re hungry. We know when we’re thirsty. It speaks to us in other ways as well and we don’t often slow down enough to listen so I—I urge all our listeners now to—to take that time to connect with themselves and find out what they need.  And one simple way, if you’re not sure how to do this, I love putting one hand on the heart, one hand on the belly–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  Like we’ve already discussed–

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah, yeah.

Elise Carr:  The exact same pose and just slow down, do some of that belly breathing and then ask, “What do you need me to know right now? What do you need me to know right now?” And without judgment, just let whatever answer comes to you come to you in whatever way, and if you get nothing that’s okay. Be open to an answer coming to you, that not in your dreams, seeing a sign, hearing a song on the radio, an answer will come to you because you’ve opened up that line of communication so be patient and come from a place of loving, kindness, and compassion for yourself.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Well, you’ve inspired me to do a really good breathing session after this podcast, so thanks for that.

Elise Carr:  Right, you’re welcome Dr. J.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Awesome. Well, last question for you. I typically end his podcast with every question for all the different guests here. But if you are on a desert island, what would be the one supplement or herb that you’d want to take with yourself.

Elise Carr:  Ooh, that is so tricky because I’m such an herb person.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  It could be anything.

Elise Carr:  Maybe—yeah, yeah. May—I say oregano. I know, you guys say oregano.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Yeah.

Elise Carr:  I’ll probably take that because it’s so multipurpose, full of multi-useful being an antibacterial and anti-fungal.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Absolutely.

Elise Carr:  And that you could probably take, you know, a little bit every day. I’m gathering a what, clean water on this island. Take a little bit every day to, you know, to keep my immune system strong as well and—and make me feel, you know, as healthy as—as I guess I can be with only one herb.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  I love it. Well, I’ve gone to Mexico a few times and gotten parasite infections and I brought it with myself and it’s totally knocked it out, so–

Elise Carr:  There you do.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Very, very cool.

Elise Carr:   Thank you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Alright, well, Elise great chatting with you. StellaMuse.com and look forward to having you back soon.

Elise Carr:  Thank you so much, Dr. J. You have a wonderful rest of your day. It’s been a pleasure speaking with you.

Dr. Justin Marchegiani:  Thanks, you as well, Elise.

 


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